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Conrail

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NEWS
February 2, 1988 | By REGINALD STUART, Daily News Staff Writer
Officials at Conrail yesterday took sharp exception to a federal report highly critical of the railroad's safety operations. The 800-page report by the Federal Railroad Administration, the government's top rail-safety enforcement agency, charged that there were widespread shortcomings in Conrail's safety operations. The problems are not serious enough to shut the railroad down, FRA Administrator John Riley said at a news conference. "By the same token, however, we have levied more than 1,700 violations on the railroad," Riley said.
NEWS
April 28, 1986
L. Stanley Crane, chairman and chief executive officer of Conrail, has given a persuasive update on reasons why Congress should keep the railroad independent and not sell it to Norfolk Southern Corp. Testifying in Washington Wednesday before the Senate Appropriations subcommittee on transportation, he presented the basic arithmetic to dramatize that the proposed sale actually would be a giveaway. Conrail has $939 million in cash and $360 million in overfunded pension assets for a total of about $1.3 billion.
BUSINESS
April 23, 1993 | Daily News Wire Services
Conrail's stock fell more than 9 percent on Wall Street yesterday, as traders responded to the company's report of a $28 million first-quarter net loss and to ratings downgrades by two analysts. Shares of the Philadelphia-based Conrail fell 5 3/8, or 9.4 percent, to 51 3/4, on the New York Stock Exchange. It was the NYSE's sixth-largest drop, in percentage terms. Volume was active at 2.2 million shares. There also was a trading delay on the stock. On Wednesday, Conrail reported a net loss of $28 million, or 39 cents a share after charges, vs. a profit of $38 million, or 42 cents a share, in the year-ago period.
BUSINESS
May 8, 1986 | By Tom Belden, Inquirer Staff Writer
Norfolk Southern Corp. said yesterday it "will consider" a Transportation Department request to raise its offer for Conrail by $700 million, to $1.9 billion, company chairman Robert B. Claytor said in a terse statement. Neither Claytor nor other executives of Norfolk Southern, which has fought an almost two-year struggle to acquire Conrail, indicated when a decision would be made. In a letter sent Tuesday to Rep. John D. Dingell (D., Mich.), chairman of the House Energy and Commerce Committee, Transportation Secretary Elizabeth Hanford Dole suggested that Norfolk Southern should increase its bid. Dingell said last week - and reiterated Tuesday - that he considers Dole's plan to sell Conrail to Norfolk Southern fatally flawed, primarily because of its anti-competitive consequences.
NEWS
January 3, 1986
In testifying at numerous congressional hearings, Norfolk Southern Corp. executives issued frequent reminders that their offer to buy Conrail might expire at the end of last year. They apparently hoped the warning would pressure Congress to approve the sale without carefully considering other options. They even hinted that, if the offer were extended beyond Dec. 31, the price might be reduced - a clumsy attempt to persuade Congress that Conrail could have a bad year in 1985 and its value might decline.
NEWS
February 15, 1986
If you want to know what being in limbo is like, ask the Conrail employees. Although we don't want Norfolk Southern to buy us, it's hell not knowing what's going to happen to us. Between President Reagan and Secretary of Transportation Elizabeth Dole, they want to get rid of Conrail, which is a money-making enterprise. Do they take a high bid? No, the lowest. Do they concern themselves with antitrust laws? No, they try to change them to suit themselves. Do they care about the employees who will lose their jobs?
BUSINESS
April 30, 1992 | by Rose DeWolf, Daily News Staff Writer
Take that, Conrail. Boom! Bang! Biff! In a speech in Philadelphia yesterday, Robert J. Ritchie, president of CP Rail System, attacked Conrail and suggested that a new law might be needed to force Conrail to act like a good corporate citizen. Ritchie was the closing speaker for a two-day seminar on rail freight issues sponsored by the Delaware River Regional Planning Commission. He pointed out that CP Rail, parent of Canadian Pacific Railroad, bought the local Delaware & Hudson Railroad last year.
BUSINESS
September 12, 1990 | By Rose DeWolf, Daily News Staff Writer
Conrail will not confirm reports that either Pittsburgh or Indianapolis will be selected as the site of a new national customer service center. Reports to that effect have come from the Pennsylvania Department of Commerce and from an Indianapolis city official, according to the Associated Press. The center will consolidate the 10 existing centers, one of which is in Philadelphia, that now handle customer orders for freight cars. Conrail spokesman David Neurohr said that the decision on where the center will be located will be made later this year and Conrail will make no statement about locations being considered.
BUSINESS
January 25, 1990 | By Rose DeWolf, Daily News Staff Writer The Associated Press contributed to this report
Members of the Brotherhood of Maintenance of Way Employees union walked informational picket lines yesterday to protest plans by Conrail to cut its capital expense and maintenance budget, which could reduce jobs at the company. Pickets appeared at Conrail's engine house, on River Road in Camden, and at seven other locations in Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Ohio and Indiana. The union, which has been attempting to negotiate a new contract for the past 20 months, also accuses Conrail management of failing to negotiate in good faith.
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NEWS
June 11, 2014 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Robert J. Yarsinsky, 86, of Mount Laurel, who retired in 1990 as administrative assistant to the chief engineering officer at Conrail, died of cardiac arrest Friday, June 6, at Virtua Memorial in Mount Holly. Born in Haverstraw, N.Y., Mr. Yarsinsky graduated from Haverstraw High School and began his railroad career as a timekeeper on the New York Central, a son, John, said. Mr. Yarsinsky was an Army combat medic from December 1951 to October 1952, during the conflict in Korea, and then returned to the New York Central.
NEWS
March 22, 2014 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
  John P. Arango IV disliked organized sports, including politics. In all his 91 years, daughter Cheryl Overbey said, "he went to one football game, and that was enough. " The names of the teams are lost to memory. Whether football or baseball or ping-pong, "he could wait to hear the score and that was good enough for him. " As for politics, she said, "he didn't trust any politician. " On Sunday, March 16, Mr. Arango, 91, of Blackwood, who retired in 1983 as a payroll clerk for Conrail, died at home.
NEWS
January 21, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Stanley S. Frazee Jr., 82, of Wyndmoor, a retired Conrail lawyer, died Monday, Jan. 13, of cancer at Keystone Hospice in Wyndmoor. Mr. Frazee was a former associate general counsel for Consolidated Rail Corp. (Conrail) and its predecessors - the Pennsylvania Railroad Co. and Penn Central Transportation Co. After retiring from Conrail in the 1990s, Mr. Frazee at different times was associated with the Philadelphia law firms Gallagher, Reilly & Lachat and Hohn & Scheuerle. He retired for good in the 2000s.
NEWS
December 18, 2013 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Staff Writer
WOODBURY The Gloucester County hazardous-materials team should meet and train more regularly, coordinate better with county public safety agencies, and develop a long-term plan to improve performance, an investigative panel concluded in a review of the team's response to last year's train derailment and chemical spill in Paulsboro. The county appointed the three-person panel in January, after a dozen firefighters from Washington Township quit the countywide Hazmat team, saying the air-monitoring equipment they used while responding to the toxic spill was inoperable.
NEWS
December 2, 2013 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Walt Stevenson grew up by Mantua Creek in Paulsboro. When he was a kid, Stevenson helped a railroad employee with a bad leg manually open and close the bridge overhead where trains passed through. "Never a lick of trouble," he said. As a teenager, Stevenson courted his high school sweetheart, Irma, on the creek, rowing out to the Delaware and all the way to Philadelphia International Airport. They married and later taught their kids to swim there. And they've lived in a house on the waterfront, the bridge visible from their kitchen window, for the last 28 years.
NEWS
November 27, 2013 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Staff Writer
PAULSBORO U.S. Rep. Robert E. Andrews called Monday for more vigorous, independent oversight of railroads, nearly a year after a train derailment in Paulsboro caused the release of a toxic chemical and forced hundreds of people from their homes. Standing in front of the bridge where the Conrail train derailed, Andrews (D., N.J.) said at a news conference that legislation he introduced last week would require that rail bridges be inspected by independent engineering firms at least once every two years.
NEWS
November 8, 2013 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
  Randolph R. Resor, 61, an adviser since 2009 to the assistant secretary for policy at the U.S. Department of Transportation, died of a heart attack Friday, Nov. 1, at his home in Merchantville. He was an industry analyst for the department's Surface Transportation Board from 2006 to 2009. And from 1987 to 2006, Mr. Resor was vice president for costing and economic analysis at Zeta-Tech Associates Inc., a railway engineering consulting firm in Cherry Hill, where he worked on international projects, his wife, Carol, said in a phone interview.
NEWS
November 5, 2013 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
William H. Barlow, 82, of Mount Laurel, a career railroad man who retired in 1988 as supervisor of internal computer systems for Conrail in Philadelphia, died of lung cancer Tuesday, Oct. 29, at home. Mr. Barlow was a competitive recreational hockey player for decades, and an executive for a youth sports organization in Burlington County. Born in Brooklyn, N.Y., he graduated from Mountain Lakes (N.J.) High School in 1949 and attended Dartmouth College. In the Army in postwar France, he was a general's driver.
NEWS
October 28, 2013 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
The River Line awakens long before dawn. Soon, hundreds of slumbering souls are awake, too. Nearly 10 years have passed since NJ Transit inaugurated a 34-mile commuter line between Camden and Trenton. Yet, the horns blaring from light rail by day and Conrail freight trains by night still set teeth on edge. The first commuter trains pass about 6 a.m. through Riverton, a borough of 2,000 fronting the Delaware River. "We love it here," Brenda Fleig said last week, gesturing outside her door to the Victorian-era homes and gas streetlamps for which her town is known.
NEWS
August 9, 2013 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Three more first responders to last year's train derailment in Paulsboro filed suit Wednesday against Conrail and its parent companies, raising fresh allegations against the companies that came to light last month during hearings with federal investigators. The responders, who are police officers in Paulsboro and Greenwich Township, joined 15 other plaintiffs, including first responders, already involved in separate litigation against Conrail. At least 15 other suits have been filed against Conrail.
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