CollectionsConrail
IN THE NEWS

Conrail

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
February 2, 1988 | By REGINALD STUART, Daily News Staff Writer
Officials at Conrail yesterday took sharp exception to a federal report highly critical of the railroad's safety operations. The 800-page report by the Federal Railroad Administration, the government's top rail-safety enforcement agency, charged that there were widespread shortcomings in Conrail's safety operations. The problems are not serious enough to shut the railroad down, FRA Administrator John Riley said at a news conference. "By the same token, however, we have levied more than 1,700 violations on the railroad," Riley said.
NEWS
April 28, 1986
L. Stanley Crane, chairman and chief executive officer of Conrail, has given a persuasive update on reasons why Congress should keep the railroad independent and not sell it to Norfolk Southern Corp. Testifying in Washington Wednesday before the Senate Appropriations subcommittee on transportation, he presented the basic arithmetic to dramatize that the proposed sale actually would be a giveaway. Conrail has $939 million in cash and $360 million in overfunded pension assets for a total of about $1.3 billion.
BUSINESS
April 23, 1993 | Daily News Wire Services
Conrail's stock fell more than 9 percent on Wall Street yesterday, as traders responded to the company's report of a $28 million first-quarter net loss and to ratings downgrades by two analysts. Shares of the Philadelphia-based Conrail fell 5 3/8, or 9.4 percent, to 51 3/4, on the New York Stock Exchange. It was the NYSE's sixth-largest drop, in percentage terms. Volume was active at 2.2 million shares. There also was a trading delay on the stock. On Wednesday, Conrail reported a net loss of $28 million, or 39 cents a share after charges, vs. a profit of $38 million, or 42 cents a share, in the year-ago period.
BUSINESS
May 8, 1986 | By Tom Belden, Inquirer Staff Writer
Norfolk Southern Corp. said yesterday it "will consider" a Transportation Department request to raise its offer for Conrail by $700 million, to $1.9 billion, company chairman Robert B. Claytor said in a terse statement. Neither Claytor nor other executives of Norfolk Southern, which has fought an almost two-year struggle to acquire Conrail, indicated when a decision would be made. In a letter sent Tuesday to Rep. John D. Dingell (D., Mich.), chairman of the House Energy and Commerce Committee, Transportation Secretary Elizabeth Hanford Dole suggested that Norfolk Southern should increase its bid. Dingell said last week - and reiterated Tuesday - that he considers Dole's plan to sell Conrail to Norfolk Southern fatally flawed, primarily because of its anti-competitive consequences.
NEWS
January 3, 1986
In testifying at numerous congressional hearings, Norfolk Southern Corp. executives issued frequent reminders that their offer to buy Conrail might expire at the end of last year. They apparently hoped the warning would pressure Congress to approve the sale without carefully considering other options. They even hinted that, if the offer were extended beyond Dec. 31, the price might be reduced - a clumsy attempt to persuade Congress that Conrail could have a bad year in 1985 and its value might decline.
NEWS
February 15, 1986
If you want to know what being in limbo is like, ask the Conrail employees. Although we don't want Norfolk Southern to buy us, it's hell not knowing what's going to happen to us. Between President Reagan and Secretary of Transportation Elizabeth Dole, they want to get rid of Conrail, which is a money-making enterprise. Do they take a high bid? No, the lowest. Do they concern themselves with antitrust laws? No, they try to change them to suit themselves. Do they care about the employees who will lose their jobs?
BUSINESS
April 30, 1992 | by Rose DeWolf, Daily News Staff Writer
Take that, Conrail. Boom! Bang! Biff! In a speech in Philadelphia yesterday, Robert J. Ritchie, president of CP Rail System, attacked Conrail and suggested that a new law might be needed to force Conrail to act like a good corporate citizen. Ritchie was the closing speaker for a two-day seminar on rail freight issues sponsored by the Delaware River Regional Planning Commission. He pointed out that CP Rail, parent of Canadian Pacific Railroad, bought the local Delaware & Hudson Railroad last year.
BUSINESS
September 12, 1990 | By Rose DeWolf, Daily News Staff Writer
Conrail will not confirm reports that either Pittsburgh or Indianapolis will be selected as the site of a new national customer service center. Reports to that effect have come from the Pennsylvania Department of Commerce and from an Indianapolis city official, according to the Associated Press. The center will consolidate the 10 existing centers, one of which is in Philadelphia, that now handle customer orders for freight cars. Conrail spokesman David Neurohr said that the decision on where the center will be located will be made later this year and Conrail will make no statement about locations being considered.
BUSINESS
January 25, 1990 | By Rose DeWolf, Daily News Staff Writer The Associated Press contributed to this report
Members of the Brotherhood of Maintenance of Way Employees union walked informational picket lines yesterday to protest plans by Conrail to cut its capital expense and maintenance budget, which could reduce jobs at the company. Pickets appeared at Conrail's engine house, on River Road in Camden, and at seven other locations in Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Ohio and Indiana. The union, which has been attempting to negotiate a new contract for the past 20 months, also accuses Conrail management of failing to negotiate in good faith.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
March 2, 2016 | By Jacob Adelman, Staff Writer
Crews are scheduled to break ground Tuesday on an 85,000-square-foot supermarket-anchored shopping center near Third Street and Allegheny Avenue that city officials said would be a new economic engine for the surrounding Fairhill neighborhood. The $16 million project will create 140 permanent jobs in the community, according to a release from Philadelphia Industrial Development Corp. (PIDC), which is helping to fund construction. Fairhill can expect a "major economic boost" from the Plaza Allegheny project, Mayor Kenney said in a release.
NEWS
February 28, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
Maynard Webster Krug, 88, of West Chester and Dyken Pond, N.Y., a railroad company engineer and longtime train enthusiast, died Friday, Feb. 19, of dementia at home. Born in Yonkers, N.Y., he was the son of John Alfred and Martha Beatrice Fine Krug. Mr. Krug graduated from Gorton High School, Yonkers, in 1945 and enlisted in the Army Air Corps, serving in World War II until November 1946. He attended Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in Troy, N.Y., on the G.I. Bill, and graduated in 1951 with a bachelor of science degree in civil engineering.
NEWS
October 31, 2015 | By Angelo Fichera, Inquirer Staff Writer
A lawyer representing plaintiffs in federal litigation over the 2012 Paulsboro train derailment asserted in a filing Thursday that Conrail misled the court about its training program, leading to an adverse ruling against those suing over the accident and chemical spill. The filing in U.S. District Court in Camden claims an affidavit by a Conrail risk officer provided false testimony, and that the company's training program for conductors - approved by the Federal Railroad Administration months before the Nov. 30, 2012, derailment - was withheld in court.
NEWS
October 28, 2015 | By Angelo Fichera, Inquirer Staff Writer
Their number already dwindling due to settlements and dismissals, many of those suing a railroad in federal court in Camden over the 2012 Paulsboro train derailment are now being confronted with an unexpected jurisdictional hurdle. U.S. District Judge Robert B. Kugler has asked dozens of plaintiffs to demonstrate why their cases should not be dismissed under a requirement that such claims in federal court be valued at more than $75,000. Attorneys for both plaintiffs - including Paulsboro residents who reported medical concerns following the train wreck and chemical spill - and Conrail, which operated the freight train and rail line, have opposed the judge's move.
NEWS
July 29, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Thomas J. O'Donnell, 70, of Huntingdon Valley, a veteran who served in Korea and a manager at Conrail Corp. for more than 30 years, died Sunday, July 19, of pancreatic cancer at home. Born in Mount Airy, Mr. O'Donnell was a 1963 graduate of Cardinal Dougherty High School and a 1967 graduate of what is now La Salle University. He served in the Army along the Korean demilitarized zone from 1967 to 1969. Mr. O'Donnell had worked for Conrail starting in 1963 and interrupted his career to go to South Korea.
NEWS
June 12, 2015 | By Angelo Fichera, Inquirer Staff Writer
Another lost summer is in store for boaters in Mantua Creek, a lingering consequence of the November 2012 train derailment in Paulsboro. Marine traffic in the creek, which leads to the Delaware River, will continue to be stifled by bridge construction for nearly a year longer, according to a work update released by Conrail on Wednesday. The rail company - which is replacing the bridge at East Jefferson Street where the derailment and chemical spill occurred - announced it expected work on the new bridge's lift mechanism to be complete by April 1, 2016.
NEWS
December 4, 2014 | By Barbara Boyer, Inquirer Staff Writer
A lawsuit has been filed on behalf of 16 emergency responders seeking compensation and medical monitoring for health concerns stemming from a 2012 train derailment and toxic spill in Paulsboro. The lawsuit names Conrail, CSX, and Norfolk Southern, which operate a bridge that malfunctioned and caused the accident. It also names the Center for Toxicology and Environmental Health, a consulting firm hired to assess medical problems. A lawyer representing the workers said the firm, hired by the railroad companies, either failed to take urine samples for medical monitoring or lost them.
NEWS
September 26, 2014 | By Angelo Fichera, Inquirer Staff Writer
A state legislator representing Paulsboro is asking law enforcement officials to consider whether criminal charges may be fitting against the rail company, which was faulted in the 2012 train derailment and chemical spill in the borough. Assemblyman John J. Burzichelli (D., Gloucester) sent letters dated Tuesday to the U.S. Attorney's Office in Newark as well as to the New Jersey Attorney General's Office. His request was prompted by the findings of a lengthy investigation by the National Transportation Safety Board, which concluded this summer.
NEWS
September 21, 2014 | By Angelo Fichera, Inquirer Staff Writer
A string of weather stations will be placed near I-295 and rail lines to assist Gloucester County officials should an event like the 2012 Paulsboro train derailment and toxic leak occur again. The county Prosecutor's Office announced this week that it had secured $150,000 in funding to buy and maintain nine of the devices, which officials say can help them make critical decisions during emergencies. The stations can measure wind speed and direction, temperature, humidity, and barometric pressure.
NEWS
August 9, 2014 | By Angelo Fichera, Inquirer Staff Writer
The incessant banging of a pile driver Thursday marked another day of construction in the replacement of the East Jefferson Street Bridge over Mantua Creek in Paulsboro - the setting of a notorious train accident nearly two years ago. Though it was a sign of progress, it was to some an irritating reminder. "We're quite pleased that there's work going on," said Assemblyman John J. Burzichelli (D., Gloucester), but he added that the noise drowning out much of the early-afternoon news conference demonstrated "how the railroad conducts itself.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|