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Conscience

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NEWS
May 1, 2002 | By JosĀ Bufill
Legislation has been introduced in many states recently to make employers pay for contraceptives for their workers. Politicians argue that failure to cover these services constitutes a needless burden on women. But don't be fooled. Concern about providing more comprehensive health insurance is hardly the issue. The disturbing thread running through these bills is the intent to purge from law any recourse to conscientious objection in matters of human reproduction. And since today the Catholic Church stands alone in opposition to contraception, one could argue that Catholic health-care professionals and Catholic institutions are being singled out for harassment.
NEWS
May 8, 1999 | By Gregory J. Sullivan
'Conscience," explains the Catechism of the Catholic Church, "is a judgment of reason whereby the human person recognizes the moral quality of a concrete act that he is going to perform, is in the process of performing, or has already completed. " And it adds: "In all he says and does, man is obliged to follow faithfully what he knows to be just and right. " A law that strongly protects a person's obligation of conscience, particularly in the area of his professional work, is admirable.
NEWS
March 6, 1998
Fred W. Friendly once said that, with TV, "we can take the people there and show them what is happening. " This TV pioneer, president of CBS News and godfather of public broadcasting died Tuesday at 82. With Edward R. Murrow, Mr. Friendly set a standard for integrity that the world of journalism still reveres. He wanted the broadcast journalist to be a person you instinctively trusted - free from personal or institutional bias, free most of all from the green smear of the dollar.
NEWS
May 21, 2004 | By Kenneth A. Briggs
Lately, some U.S. bishops have been warning Catholic politicians who support abortion rights - politicians such as Democratic presidential candidate Sen. John Kerry - that they should refrain from Communion. The issue has reached such a peak that on Wednesday, 48 Catholic members of Congress (all Democrats) sent a letter to Cardinal Theodore E. McCarrick of Washington that such a campaign might revive anti-Catholic bigotry. This campaign is ironic, since it suggests that the hierarchy might be repudiating the church's own teachings about religious freedom and conscience.
NEWS
April 11, 2005 | By Crispin Sartwell
I once worked in a philosophy department in which one of the professors was active in NAMBLA, the North American Man/Boy Love Association. The secretary, a deeply religious woman named Julie, was assigned the task of typing up his man-boy love manuscript and sending it off to the publishers. She came close to quitting, but was the sole bread winner for three children. Finally, she held her nose and typed one-handed. I think of Julie when I think about the issue of whether pharmacists should be permitted to refuse to fill prescriptions at which their conscience balks.
NEWS
December 15, 2002
When the threat of war tests our nation, it is easy to understand why naming a high school for activist Bayard Rustin gives some of us reason for pause. To many, these times seemingly call for American unity; one nation indivisible; duty before personal expression. But Mr. Rustin, in another era haunted by war, fought the majority view, seeking change where it was unheard of - and largely unwanted. This African American, who was raised in West Chester, came of age during a time of rigid restrictions: racial, political, and social.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 1986 | By Desmond Ryan, Inquirer Movie Critic
A case of a lawyer who suffers an untimely attack of conscience and exposes his disreputable client is so rare that you might think directors would be tempted to look into it. Then again, they might retort that nobody would believe such a movie. Rive Droite, Rive Gauche, an amiable and neatly turned blend of sex and politics, offers a rebuttal of this view. And with Gerard Depardieu arguing before the court, one comes to believe in this outburst of principle. Rive Droite, Rive Gauche, which is playing today and next Thursday as part of the series of French film premieres at the Theater of the Living Arts, is a piece that seeks to charm and amuse rather than provoke.
NEWS
October 23, 2011 | By Barbara Demick, Los Angeles Times
BEIJING - They are calling it the death that awakened the conscience of China. A 2-year-old girl crushed by two vans last week and then ignored by 18 passersby as she lay bleeding on the street died at 12:32 a.m. Friday of systemic organ failure at a hospital in the southern Guangdong province. By midday, there were two million condolence messages flooding the Internet for the girl, whose name was Wang Yue, or Yueyue for short. "Heaven's roads have no cars. Go in peace, little Yueyue," wrote one woman.
NEWS
February 21, 1996 | By Natalie Pompilio, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Maybe it was the approach of Lent that pricked the thief's conscience. One week after a TV/VCR was stolen from St. Matthew Lutheran Church on Chester Avenue, the set turned up on the church doorstep, undamaged. "I'm sure whoever did it felt bothered by it, [but] we're not sure what the true story is," said a church spokeswoman who asked that her name not be used. According to Moorestown police, a church worker noticed the set missing Feb. 10 but did not report the theft until Feb. 17. That morning, officers questioned church regulars, including youths in the community-service program, church workers and a neighborhood youth who once vandalized the church by leaving a running hose in its mailbox.
NEWS
March 15, 1995 | By DAVID S. BRODER
During the half-century that Connie Mack managed the Philadelphia Athletics, he demanded that his players dress and act as proper gents. "I will not tolerate profanity, obscene language or personal insults from my bench," he said. "I will always insist as long as I am manager of the club that my boys be gentlemen. " "Mr. Mack," as he was always called, led by example. Uniquely among managers, he persisted in wearing a business suit, with tightly knotted tie, in the dugout. His grandson, Sen. Connie Mack (R., Fla.)
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BUSINESS
October 23, 2014 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Staff Writer
And the winner of Forbes' "$400,000 Pressure Cooker" is . . . Enrou - and winning with it are people in places as far from the Los Angeles start-up's home as purse and backpack makers in rural Guatemala, cotton weavers in Malawi, and artisans in Laos who turn Vietnam War bomb remnants into jewelry. Ann Wang, 23, CEO of the young company, and cofounder Jessica Willison won a $150,000 investment Tuesday from Steve Case, best known for the company he cofounded more than two decades ago, the one that became America Online.
NEWS
June 14, 2014 | By Carrie Rickey, For The Inquirer
Ruby Dee, 91, the trailblazing actress, activist and American social conscience, died Wednesday night of natural causes at her home in New Rochelle, N.Y., surrounded by her three children and seven grandchildren. She had outlived soul mate Ossie Davis, her husband of 56 years, by nearly a decade. On Broadway, in movies, and as a civil rights activist, the birdlike woman with the stirring alto voice was a change-maker and also a beneficiary of the changes she helped make. "I didn't have the kind of talent or personality that kept me dreaming about Hollywood," she reflected late in life.
NEWS
February 28, 2014
WHEN advocates of same-sex marriage pushed their case in the courts of both public opinion and law, they made sure to read the following language from that little card provided to them by the tolerance police: "No one will be forced to violate their religious beliefs if Adam can marry Steve and Madame can marry Eve. " Much like the Miranda warnings that became famous after the Supremes decided that magic words were all that were needed to protect the...
NEWS
January 21, 2014
AND NOW, just in time for Martin Luther King Jr. Day, another bright idea from the Pennsylvania Legislature. A 10-year-veteran Lancaster County lawmaker wants to amend the state Constitution to free us all from the burdens of anti-discrimination laws. You could say he has a dream. Republican Rep. Gordon Denlinger, chairman of the House Subcommittee on Fiscal Policy, an elder in the Zeltenreich Reformed Church of New Holland, Pa., is circulating a memo seeking co-sponsors for his effort.
NEWS
April 5, 2013 | By Leonard Pitts Jr
A few words on the death of Elwin Wilson. He passed last week in a South Carolina hospital at age 76. Wilson had endured heart and lung problems and had suffered a recent bout with the flu. There is little reason you would know his name, but as a young man, Wilson made a virtual career out of hatefulness. He was a Klan supporter who burned crosses, hanged a black doll in a noose, once flung a jack handle at an African American boy. In 1961, he was among a group of men who attacked a busload of Freedom Riders at a station in Rock Hill, S.C. Wilson's passing coincides with a significant anniversary: 50 years ago this week, 65 "Negroes" set out from Sixteenth Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Ala., and seated themselves at the lunch counters of five department stores.
NEWS
March 24, 2013 | By Hillel Italie and Jon Gambrell, Associated Press
Chinua Achebe, 82, the internationally celebrated Nigerian author, statesman, and dissident, died Thursday in Boston after a brief illness. He lived through times of traumatic change in Nigeria and Africa. Among his many honored works, his novel Things Fall Apart has become the most widely read novel by an African. Mr. Achebe knew both the prestige of serving on government commissions and the fear of being declared an enemy of the state. He spent much of his adult life in the United States, but never stopped calling for democracy in Nigeria or resisting literary honors from a government he refused to accept.
NEWS
November 20, 2012 | WILLIAM BENDER, Daily News Staff Writer benderw@phillynews.com, 215-854-5255
WHO SAYS YOU can't teach an old rat new tricks? Pete "The Crumb" Caprio, 83, a mob turncoat who testified against Joey Merlino in 2001, shuffled into the courtroom Monday as a government witness in the racketeering trial against Philadelphia mob boss Joseph Ligambi and his reputed lieutenants. Caprio, frail and hard of hearing, got a warm welcome from the wise guys and their attorneys at the defense table: "He's like a fossil. " "Wow!" "That guy is still alive?" Caprio, whose criminal history includes everything from gruesome murders to moonshine deliveries, probably didn't hear the taunting, but a visibly angry U.S. District Judge Eduardo C. Robreno warned the defense attorneys that future outbursts would be met with stiff fines.
NEWS
February 29, 2012 | By Scot Lehigh
By Scot Lehigh Although Rick Santorum says he's not running for pastor-in-chief, the Republican primary campaign has revealed a candidate too governed by faith to lead a diverse country. That's not because the former Pennsylvania senator is Catholic. Rather, it's because his ultraconservative religious beliefs so inform his life, his values, and his worldview that he would not be able to separate that perspective from public-policy questions, or to decide an issue on the facts rather than faith, even if he wanted to. Not that he does want to, of course.
NEWS
February 19, 2012
Renewing Yourself Through the Practice of Honesty By Paul Wilkes Workman. 144 pp. $18.95 Reviewed by Elizabeth Eisenstadt Evans Someone on the Internet confessional www.confessions.net hurt his hamster while cutting its hair. Someone else is cheating on his girlfriend. Another poster is having a tough time breaking an addiction to the World of Warcraft , according to recent posts. Check out the websites that allow anonymous virtual admissions.
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