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Consensus

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NEWS
December 27, 2000
Trapped in individualist expressions simultaneously casting an anachronism; Look in the mirror and see what we think of progress. The hardest part is a fear of finding more adolescence - separate, semi-impromptu vacations and sexual honesty, and not being able to articulate the attitudes and anxieties, and the countless places visited each day, with a popular expression. A recovered memory of old chestnuts, anonymous sex and the soul of winter; new fans of the deceptive simplicity in Zen thought for popular consumption defy an unwilling earth with rude little prods and jests.
NEWS
April 27, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
Consensus among candidates doesn't make the choice any easier for voters. But the mayoral hopefuls' general agreement on the controversial subject of taxes is a sign of progress for the city. At least ostensibly, Philadelphia's political establishment has come to understand the gravity of the city's tax problem and broadly concur on the solution. Thanks to an array of studies noted by the candidates on today's op-ed page, as well as the unforgiving lessons of experience, it's become plain that Philadelphia relies too heavily on wage and business taxes that discourage growth rather than the property taxes that fuel more successful cities.
NEWS
February 6, 1991 | By Ron Goldwyn, Daily News Staff Writer
It was Dwight Evans' night, and he was enjoying consensus of a sort. The black politicians inside the building of District 1199C, National Union of Hospital and Health Care Employees, may have been warring and scheming over the mayor's race. But all of them - and lots of white guys too - were saying nice things about Evans, who was being honored upon becoming the new chairman of the state House Appropriations Committee. "This is the night I should announce for mayor," said Evans, ladling himself some ruby red punch.
NEWS
March 29, 1991 | By WILLIAM RASPBERRY
It won't show up in the polls or in the speeches of politicians. It may not even show up in private conversations among friends. Still, I am convinced there is a public consensus on the "underclass" - the discouraged and alienated residents who threaten to overwhelm so many inner-city neighborhoods. And that the consensus is this: It's their own fault. They are poor because they prefer government handouts to hard work, and they remain poor because they ignore the opportunities to better themselves.
NEWS
November 25, 1987 | By David S. Broder
The good news this Thanksgiving is that consensus government is beginning to work in Washington and is likely to continue. Prospective successes for the policy managers now in office are more numerous and significant than generally realized. And those successes are likely to influence in a positive way the character of the next president and his government. A budget agreement, reducing deficits by $76 billion in the next two years, has been signed and sealed. Congress will deliver on it almost assuredly because the consequences of reneging are too scary for anyone to contemplate.
NEWS
October 11, 1992 | By Marc Duvoisin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The mayor emerged from City Hall around 3:30 last Tuesday afternoon, beaming like a lottery winner. Leaders of the city's blue-collar union had just approved a tentative contract agreement with the city. A long-feared walkout by city employees had ended - after 16 hours. Rendell was off to watch his 12-year-old son play football. On the way to his car, as he schmoozed with cops, cameramen and a few lingering pickets, he seemed not only relieved, but downright celebratory. And who could blame him?
NEWS
November 29, 1992 | By Russell E. Eshleman Jr., INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU Wanda Motley of the Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau contributed to this article
It is one of the most elusive critters here in the wilds of Gridlock City. It's called consensus. Every two years, Pennsylvania taxpayers pay 253 men and women quite handsomely to find it, to search for solutions to the state's most vexing problems. How should the state spend the millions of dollars it has allocated for higher education? Where should boundaries be drawn to ensure the best congressional representation? What should be done about rising welfare costs? They're tough questions with many possible answers.
SPORTS
May 12, 2014 | By Mike Sielski, Inquirer Columnist
The writer and physician Michael Crichton delivered an important speech in 2003 about the Eagles and the NFL draft. OK, so it wasn't about the Eagles, really, or the NFL draft at all. It was about science and intellectual integrity and independent thinking and the tyranny of a word that, honest to goodness, is relevant to the Eagles' selection of Louisville linebacker Marcus Smith in the first round of this year's draft. That word is consensus . "Consensus is the business of politics," Crichton said.
NEWS
May 4, 2001
Michelle Malkin's column (April 30) is replete with the same elitist diatribe that anyone concerned with environmental issues has come to expect from the misinformed. Is the United States, leading source of environmental pollution, too good to abide by the Kyoto protocol while other nations are willing to abide by it? Her only valid point is that underdeveloped nations are experiencing threats of diarrhea and malaria, but she fails to mention that billions of dollars and a handful of decades have been spent to combat these diseases, sadly with little to no long-term success.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 28, 2011
DEAR ABBY : My mother and I had a debate about who should pay for dates. She thinks the man should pay, especially if sex is involved because "you don't want to give it away for free. " I disagree. I say the man should pay for the first, and maybe the second date. After that, they can agree to alternate. I have been seeing a wonderful guy for about six months. I'm pretty sure I make more money than he does, but even if I didn't, I don't feel the need to be supported. I don't agree that the guy should always have to pay. Times have changed since my mother dated.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 27, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
Consensus among candidates doesn't make the choice any easier for voters. But the mayoral hopefuls' general agreement on the controversial subject of taxes is a sign of progress for the city. At least ostensibly, Philadelphia's political establishment has come to understand the gravity of the city's tax problem and broadly concur on the solution. Thanks to an array of studies noted by the candidates on today's op-ed page, as well as the unforgiving lessons of experience, it's become plain that Philadelphia relies too heavily on wage and business taxes that discourage growth rather than the property taxes that fuel more successful cities.
SPORTS
May 12, 2014 | By Mike Sielski, Inquirer Columnist
The writer and physician Michael Crichton delivered an important speech in 2003 about the Eagles and the NFL draft. OK, so it wasn't about the Eagles, really, or the NFL draft at all. It was about science and intellectual integrity and independent thinking and the tyranny of a word that, honest to goodness, is relevant to the Eagles' selection of Louisville linebacker Marcus Smith in the first round of this year's draft. That word is consensus . "Consensus is the business of politics," Crichton said.
SPORTS
April 9, 2014 | BY MIKE KERN, Daily News Staff Writer kernm@phillynews.com
TO GARRET KERR, his father, Tim, isn't the Flyers legend. He's just Dad. And his No. 1 fan. And neither of them would have it any other way. "I was born in 1992, just after he retired, so I don't have any recollection of his playing days," said Garret, a junior forward at University of the Sciences who was a consensus Division II All-America after averaging 24.8 points and 12.5 rebounds, both school records. "I knew he was kind of famous. And obviously my friends' parents knew.
NEWS
July 1, 2013 | By Jeffrey Rosen
The blockbuster Supreme Court term that ended last week might seem to deliver a severe case of whiplash. One day the court delighted conservatives by striking down a key provision of the Voting Rights Act and the next it delighted liberals by striking down the federal Defense of Marriage Act. At the same time, the court avoided sweeping rulings on affirmative action and the right to marriage equality nationwide. In fact, however, the historic end-of-term decisions represent a clash between the competing visions of two key justices: Anthony M. Kennedy and Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. When Kennedy provided a crucial fifth vote for the conservative or the liberal justices, as he did in the Voting Rights and Defense of Marriage Act cases, the court issued polarized rulings striking down federal laws along familiar ideological lines.
NEWS
February 6, 2013 | By Angela Delli Santi, Associated Press
TRENTON - A powerful Democrat is moving ahead with a plan to ask New Jersey voters in November to approve long-term funding for open space preservation, but there's no consensus on how to pay for it. The Senate Environmental Committee on Monday discussed three funding options now that $400 million in land-preservation bonds that voters approved in 2009 have been spent. Funding sources being considered are a water-user fee that would cost residential customers about $36 a year, setting aside $200 million a year from sales tax revenue, or replenishing the fund again through borrowing.
NEWS
January 22, 2013
By Dayle Steinberg Forty years ago today, the Supreme Court affirmed that the Constitution gives every woman a right to make her own personal medical decisions, ostensibly without the interference of politicians. A majority of Americans still support that right. Most Americans say they support access to safe and legal abortion in some or most cases. Last year, a Quinnipiac University poll found that nearly two-thirds of voters said they support Roe v. Wade , while a Pew Research Center survey found that 64 percent of voters ages 18 to 29 think abortion should be legal in all or most cases.
SPORTS
October 25, 2012 | By the Daily News
ED BARKOWITZ: IT'S IRONIC THAT banished centerfielder Melky Cabrera's All-Star Game MVP performance gave the Giants homefield advantage, which will make for a long World Series. Picking against Justin Verlander is akin to tugging on Superman's cape or spitting into the wind. It's just not a good idea. The Tigers stud is on one of those Orel Hershiser/Josh Beckett-like postseason runs with a 3-0 record and a 0.74 ERA in three postseason starts. This, after winning each of his last four starts and posting a 0.64 ERA. The guy is scorching.
NEWS
August 27, 2012
By Llewellyn King Just what is being cooked up by New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg; Rupert Murdoch, the world's most successful multimedia mogul; and Bill Daley, the Chicago businessman who once sat at the right hand of power as President Obama's chief of staff? This unlikely trio has been on the road calling for more immigration. They see it as the only solution to America's problems, and their text is taken from a new study conducted by the Partnership for a New American Economy.
NEWS
June 5, 2012 | By Matt Katz, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
TRENTON - When Gov. Christie put out a parody video with Democratic Newark Mayor Cory Booker last month, the Republican governor described it as a quintessentially bipartisan effort - "emblematic of the way I've tried to govern. " "Look at Washington, D.C.," he said at a public town hall the day the video became a YouTube sensation. "They can't get a thing done down there, and everybody's at fault, everybody's to blame. People have to start reaching across the aisle, and start working with each other.
NEWS
May 20, 2012 | By Ben Feller and Jim Kuhnhenn, Associated Press
CAMP DAVID, Md. - Confronting an economic crisis that threatens them all, President Obama and leaders of other world powers on Saturday declared that their governments must both spark growth and cut the debt that has crippled the European continent and put investors worldwide on edge. "There's now an emerging consensus that more must be done to promote growth and job creation right now," Obama proclaimed after hosting unprecedented economic talks at Camp David, his mountaintop retreat.
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