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Consent Decree

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NEWS
April 30, 1999 | By Tom Avril and Douglas A. Campbell, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
A U.S. Justice Department investigation has found enough evidence to bring a civil-rights suit against the New Jersey State Police, but the state is hoping to negotiate a settlement, state Attorney General Peter Verniero said yesterday. Verniero's announcement came about three years after federal authorities began investigating allegations of racial discrimination against the state police and days after a state review acknowledged that troopers single out minority motorists. "We look forward to working with the Justice Department as a partner to ensure that New Jersey becomes a model for addressing this important civil-rights issue," Verniero said yesterday in a statement.
NEWS
December 31, 1999 | By Tom Avril, INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
A federal judge approved an agreement between New Jersey and the U.S. Justice Department yesterday on what steps the state will take to prevent racial profiling by state troopers. The two sides announced the agreement and a long list of reforms last week, and the judge's approval had been expected. Technically called a consent decree, the agreement came eight months after the Justice Department threatened the state with a lawsuit. The decree was signed by U.S. District Judge Mary L. Cooper, who was formally assigned to the case yesterday.
NEWS
March 12, 1986 | By Maida Odom, Inquirer Staff Writer
The New Eastern Food Co. Inc., the Tioga-based Chinese-restaurant supplier that was closed in January because of unsanitary conditions, has signed a consent decree permitting it to salvage some of the food items that were padlocked. The warehouse, at 1901-13 W. Westmoreland Street, was seized and padlocked Jan. 13 by federal officials who alleged that some food stored there had been contaminated by rodents and insects. Under the consent decree, New Eastern may proceed to "recondition" any "salvageable articles of food," according to a statement released yesterday by the U.S. attorney's office.
NEWS
February 26, 2000 | by Mensah M. Dean, Daily News Staff Writer
It's not as difficult to remove abandoned cars from city streets as Mayor Street claims, and a 1981 court agreement that spells out procedures for notifying owners before towing should remain in place, according to Community Legal Services. Poppycock, answers Mayor Street's chief of staff, Stephanie Franklin-Suber. She says no other municipality in the state has such legal difficulty in removing junk cars and the 19-year-old agreement must be scrapped. "We'd like to come to an amicable agreement and if not we are prepared to challenge this in court," said Franklin-Suber . "From Day One they have been dealing with the consent decree like it's part of the problem, I assume to distract from solving the problem," said Irv Ackelsberg, Community Legal Services managing attorney.
NEWS
April 12, 1989 | By Rich Heidorn Jr., Inquirer Staff Writer
Seven years and $41 million later, Camden County officials may soon be back where they started in 1982: having to tell a federal court judge why their jail is overcrowded. The New Jersey Department of the Public Advocate said yesterday that it would ask U.S. District Judge Harold A. Ackerman to reduce the number of inmates at the jail, where the population has nearly tripled since its opening last year. Audrey Bomse, an attorney in the office of inmate advocacy, said she planned to file a motion this week asking Ackerman to impose an inmate cap and to hold county and state officials in contempt for violating a 1986 consent decree.
NEWS
May 20, 1987
Philadelphia's prisons are overcrowded. Roughly three-fourths of those incarcerated are legally innocent, awaiting trial. The only reason they are held is that they are too poor to post bail. No one should suffer the inhumanity of overcrowded prisons, but it is especially cruel and unjust to subject innocents to it solely because they are the poorest of the poor. Recognizing that, last year the Goode administration agreed in a consent decree to reduce the prison population, then averaging 4,200, in phases to 3,750 by July 13. U.S. District Court Judge Norma L. Shapiro approved the consent decree last Dec. 31, but so far it has been blocked by a challenge from District Attorney Ronald D. Castille.
NEWS
November 20, 2009
DOESN'T EVERYONE take a civil-service test to get hired by the city for the Fire Department? Why do they need a consent decree? You take the test, get ranked by your score numerically and get hired in order. Veterans get an extra 10 points for their service to our country (white, black, Asian, etc.). Sounds pretty straightforward to me. Why do the Club Valiants feel African-Americans need special preferences to get hired? Do they think they can't measure up? Sounds like they're stereotyping their own race.
NEWS
September 18, 1990 | By Emilie Lounsberry, Inquirer Staff Writer
Police Commissioner Willie L. Williams and the head of the Guardian Civic League endorsed a proposed consent decree yesterday that would resolve a lawsuit alleging that the department's entrance examination discriminates against blacks. Williams and Ronald D. Oliver, president of the Guardian Civic League, were among the witnesses called to testify during a hearing about the settlement before Senior U.S. District Judge Raymond J. Broderick, who has postponed a decision on whether to approve the proposal.
NEWS
December 1, 1987 | By John Woestendiek, Inquirer Staff Writer
State Corrections Commissioner David S. Owens Jr. has been found in contempt of a federal court consent decree and will face fines of $500 a day unless he changes the way the department alerts inmates of changes in prison regulations. U.S. District Judge Joseph S. Lord 3d, in an order filed Wednesday, ruled that the department must begin notifying inmates individually of changes in the inmate code of conduct, rather than merely posting rule changes on prison bulletin boards. Lord gave Owens 30 days to amend the policy or be subject to fines.
NEWS
November 14, 2014 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Even with the revelation that NCAA officials may have bluffed their way through getting Pennsylvania State University to agree to football sanctions, the chairman of the university's board of trustees on Thursday maintained that the university made the right decision signing the consent decree. And the university, Chairman Keith Masser said, will continue to honor the deal. "It's easy to play cards when they're turned up," Masser said in an interview, during a break in board committee meetings on Thursday.
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NEWS
August 14, 2016 | By Andrew Maykuth, STAFF WRITER
Highland Township, a tiny Elk County town that in 2013 approved an ordinance banning natural-gas wastewater injection wells, overturned the ordinance this week and promptly settled a federal lawsuit with a Marcellus Shale gas producer that wants to build a disposal well in the community. Two new supervisors on the township's three-member governing board voted Wednesday to rescind the ordinance, saying they were unlikely to prevail in a lawsuit with gas producer Seneca Resources Corp.
BUSINESS
June 25, 2016 | By Julie Shaw, Staff Writer
Yuengling brewery has agreed to settle violations of the Clean Water Act, the U.S. Department of Justice announced Thursday. In a consent decree filed Thursday in U.S. District Court in Harrisburg, the Pennsylvania brewery - America's oldest - agreed to spend about $7 million to improve environmental measures and pay a $2.8 million penalty. Federal authorities said D.G. Yuengling and Son Inc., based in Pottsville, Schuylkill County, violated Clean Water Act requirements for companies that discharge industrial waste to municipal publicly owned wastewater-treatment facilities.
BUSINESS
May 30, 2015 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Federal Trade Commission said Thursday that Teva Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd., now the parent company of Cephalon, agreed to repay $1.2 billion in "ill-gotten gains" for pay-to-delay deals when the two companies were competitors. The settlement came as a trial was set to begin Monday in U.S. District Court in Philadelphia. In a 2008 lawsuit, the FTC alleged that Cephalon paid more than $300 million to four generic drugmakers, including Teva, to delay sales of their versions of Cephalon's blockbuster sleep-disorder drug Provigil.
NEWS
March 22, 2015 | By Jason Laughlin, Inquirer Staff Writer
A complaint filed this week served as a reminder that the legal battles over the Jerry Sandusky child sex-abuse scandal are far from over. At least seven civil cases as well as criminal complaints against three former Pennsylvania State University administrators are pending. A January settlement between the NCAA and a Pennsylvania state legislator restored 111 of former head football coach Joe Paterno's wins and replaced the consent decree that defined penalties against the university.
NEWS
January 15, 2015 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
A possible settlement among the NCAA, Pennsylvania State University, and state officials might restore more than 100 wins to Joe Paterno's record, but won't satisfy critics who say the league and university must admit mistakes in their handling of the Jerry Sandusky child sex-abuse case and take steps to prevent future lapses. "This has never been about wins for us," Anthony Lubrano, an alumni-elected member of the university's board of trustees, said Tuesday, a day after news of settlement talks emerged.
NEWS
November 14, 2014 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Even with the revelation that NCAA officials may have bluffed their way through getting Pennsylvania State University to agree to football sanctions, the chairman of the university's board of trustees on Thursday maintained that the university made the right decision signing the consent decree. And the university, Chairman Keith Masser said, will continue to honor the deal. "It's easy to play cards when they're turned up," Masser said in an interview, during a break in board committee meetings on Thursday.
NEWS
November 8, 2014 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Commonwealth Court judge granted a request Friday that she privately review 477 e-mails from the NCAA related to the Pennsylvania State University child-molestation scandal that the organization had argued were protected internal communications. Judge Anne E. Covey ordered the NCAA to deliver the e-mails by noon next Friday for her to review as part of a lawsuit brought by State Sen. Jake Corman (R., Centre) over who would benefit from the $60 million fine the university agreed to pay to the NCAA.
NEWS
October 8, 2014 | By Chris Hepp, Inquirer Staff Writer
A 1975 federal consent decree designed to remedy discrimination against blacks in the Philadelphia Fire Department has been dissolved. As a result of a ruling last week by U.S. District Judge Timothy Rice, Philadelphia is free of the court-ordered hiring requirements put in place to boost the percentage of African Americans serving in the city fire department. When the decree was issued 39 years ago, about 7 percent of the city's fire fighters were black. Today the figure is about 27.6 percent and an African American - Fire Commissioner Derrick Sawyer - leads the department's 2,100 uniformed employees.
BUSINESS
August 15, 2014 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pennsylvania State University's divided board of trustees treated Nittany Lions fans to a rare public debate Wednesday. Trustees voted, 19-8, in favor of a litigation settlement proposal that would bind the state-backed university to "remain committed to full compliance with the Consent Decree" signed with the NCAA in 2012. The deal would uphold the original $60 million payment, management reforms, and football program sanctions that came in the wake of the Jerry Sandusky child-sex abuse scandal.
NEWS
July 30, 2014 | By Jonathan Tamari, Inquirer Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - Five U.S. representatives from Pennsylvania have asked the NCAA to rescind the penalties imposed on Pennsylvania State University for its leaders' handling of the Jerry Sandusky child sex-abuse scandal. "Continuing these unprecedented sanctions harms innocent student athletes and further erodes the increasingly specious credibility" of the NCAA, the five lawmakers wrote in a July 24 letter to Mark Emmert, president of the organization that oversees college sports. The representatives cited an April 9 Commonwealth Court ruling that sharply questioned the validity of a consent decree between the NCAA and Penn State imposing the penalties.
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