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Consignment

NEWS
November 28, 2003 | By Keith Herbert INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Three men robbed a Rittenhouse Square clothing store of $70,000 worth of furs and escaped in a stolen minivan Wednesday, Philadelphia police said yesterday. The men got away with about 15 furs, said Detective James Seymour of Central Detectives. Each of them grabbed "an arm's worth," Seymour added. A store employee, Steve Applebaum, "buzzed" a man into Trame Retail Clothing Inc., 110 S. 18th St., about 5:10 p.m. The man was quickly followed by two others. The men asked to see items in the store, which sells Jacques Ferber furs on consignment from various vendors.
NEWS
April 22, 1989 | By David Iams, Inquirer Staff Writer
In addition to the usual run of fine furniture and colorful crafts, sales next week will offer auctiongoers a couple of glimpses into the odd worlds of Victorian vanity and sports-car nomenclature. The Victorian vanity is a contraption of velvet, wire and beveled glass that will go on the block Wednesday at the Concordville Inn at the intersection of Routes 1 and 322. It is part of a consignment sale being conducted by William H. Bunch. "It's supposed to be a pin cushion," Bunch said yesterday, but added the disclaimer: "They had to call it something.
NEWS
September 2, 1990 | By Lita Solis-Cohen, Special to The Inquirer
The last two decades have been a boom time for auctions. However, there have been recent signs that the auction may be losing some of its allure. Dealers who had been watching the best items go on the block have recently been able to buy important collections and individual items, and they have been getting more consignments. The Philadelphia Print Shop, for instance, recently obtained a consignment of a large and important private collection of Philadelphia prints and maps, the sort of collection that, if it were in an estate, would probably have gone to auction.
BUSINESS
May 30, 2011 | By Christina Rexrode, Associated Press
NEW YORK - It's graduation season, which means there's no shortage of lectures for new college graduates about the things they shouldn't buy. This isn't one. No matter how tight the budgets of new baccalaureates, some spending is required. Here are a few of the items that should be at the top of every grad's shopping list. Go to lunch: This isn't to endorse eating out when leftovers at your desk will do. But there's great value in calling a senior colleague at work, a recruiter at a place you want to work, or a mentor from a previous job and asking him or her to lunch.
NEWS
March 5, 2009 | By PENNY PINCHER, pennypincher@phillynews.com 215-854-5961
Yo, I'm Penny Pincher, trying to survive these hard times without bailouts, handouts or freakouts by living small but smart. You are, too, judging from the dollar-stretching secrets you've been sending me at pennypincher@phillynews.com - so keep 'em coming, fellow-Pinchers! Copycat Cost Cutters: Ellen Merrigan, from Bustleton, writes: "I make my own cleaning products with vinegar, baking soda, lemon juice and water. I bought a 1.32-gallon jug of vinegar at BJ's Wholesale Club for under $4.00, then got household cleaner recipes at . "And this one is huge!
NEWS
October 17, 1992 | By David Iams, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As American names go, Homans is quite distinguished, going back to the colonial era and currently appearing in both the Social Register and Who's Who. Next weekend, testimony to the significance of the family in U.S. history will go on the auction block, when Barry Slosberg auctions off about 100 lots of possessions of Robert S. Homans. The goods will be a major part of an auction beginning at 10 a.m. Saturday and Oct. 25 at the BSB Gallery, 232 N. Second St. The top item from the Homans consignment probably is a piece of scrimshaw acquired by Benjamin Homans, a naval officer in the War of 1812.
NEWS
January 1, 1994 | By David Iams, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
If you are into omens, two early January auctions, one tomorrow, the other on Jan. 12, suggest that 1994 may be the Year of the Unusual. Tomorrow's auction, at 11 a.m. at Main Line Auctioneers & Appraisers Inc. in Malvern, will feature freak coins, those with irregularities in their striking. Among them are a Liberty penny with the letter L missing, a buffalo nickel with a three-legged buffalo, and a 1941 dime that was overstruck with a 2. "They (the U.S. Mint) had so many dimes left over from 1941 that they decided to strike them over with a 2," Pat Narcisi of the family-run auction house said yesterday.
NEWS
December 31, 1994 | By David Iams, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
If the excesses of New Year's Eve are not such that the sound of an auctioneer's hammer announcing a knockdown would be more than your throbbing head could bear, there are several good New Year's Day auctions to tempt your fancies and your pocketbooks. The biggest probably is a two-day sale that will be run tomorrow and Monday by Stephenson's Auction in Southampton, Bucks County. More than 500 lots will be offered at the two sessions, each beginning at 11 a.m., with the more important items scheduled for tomorrow.
NEWS
April 25, 1995 | By Kristi Nelson, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
At the grand opening of the Springfield High School Formal Wear Thrift Shop, the crowds did not pour in. Taffy and lollipops have not worked as a lure to attract the school's young ladies, who are in the market for formal dresses in this gala season of proms and late school year dances. So, business has been slow at this innovative in-school boutique, which features an array of second-hand formal wear - some hot, some not so hot - priced between $25 and $50, a lot less than they would cost new. The store is the brainchild of some staffers at the school, many of them parents of teenage girls, who hatched the idea of the formal-wear consignment shop during a series of lunchtime powwows.
LIVING
September 29, 2006 | By David Iams FOR THE INQUIRER
Kamelot Auctions will go into its third season tomorrow with a sale of more than 500 lots of furniture, statuary, lighting and artwork at its gallery in the 4700 Wissahickon Ave. complex. More than two dozen lots come from the Parisian furniture-maker Jansen, including a consignment from a descendant of the company's founder, Jean-Henri Jansen. Jansen went out of business in the 1970s, Jeff Kamel, head of the auction company (affiliated with Susanin of Chicago), said this week.
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