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Consignment

NEWS
February 4, 1993 | By Kathi Kauffman, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Vickie Krane has spent the last few months browsing through other women's closets. Last month, Krane and her husband, Jeff, who own the Gladwyne Cleaners, opened the Village Boutique, a consignment and retail clothing store at Righters Mill and Youngsford Roads, in the heart of Gladwyne. Since the fall, the Kranes have been gathering merchandise for the new store "from the finest closets on the Main Line," Krane said. Their big break came when they were contacted by Albert Nipon and his wife, who consigned hundreds of outfits.
NEWS
January 21, 1993 | By Kathi Kauffman, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Five Philadelphia men have been charged with smashing the front window of Renaissance Resale and Consignment in Bryn Mawr Saturday morning and stealing about $5,000 worth of women's fur coats and leather jackets. Lower Merion police arrested the five after a car chase and took them to Montgomery County Prison. Lt. George Clement said three of the men were transvestites. Police discovered this, he said, when the men changed into prison uniforms and three of them were wearing women's underwear.
NEWS
October 17, 1992 | By David Iams, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As American names go, Homans is quite distinguished, going back to the colonial era and currently appearing in both the Social Register and Who's Who. Next weekend, testimony to the significance of the family in U.S. history will go on the auction block, when Barry Slosberg auctions off about 100 lots of possessions of Robert S. Homans. The goods will be a major part of an auction beginning at 10 a.m. Saturday and Oct. 25 at the BSB Gallery, 232 N. Second St. The top item from the Homans consignment probably is a piece of scrimshaw acquired by Benjamin Homans, a naval officer in the War of 1812.
BUSINESS
August 31, 1992 | By Sandra Salmans, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
So you want to go into business for yourself? But you're risk-averse? Cash- poor? And mindful it's a sluggish economy? Look no farther than your own - and your friends' - closets. Selling "nearly new" clothing and other items on consignment - an arrangement under which individuals are paid only if their merchandise is sold - would seem to be a business born for the downsized '90s. It's economical, ecological (after all, everything is being recycled) and entrepreneurial. And, sure enough, growing numbers of women in the Philadelphia area and across the country, many with no retail experience, are setting up shop these days.
NEWS
July 5, 1992 | By DAVID S. BRODER
Senators can be studied in committee hearings or television studios, but governors must be seen in their home states if they are to be understood. Take Bill Clinton out of Arkansas and he seems another blow-dried politician with a smooth way of talking. Watch him at home, in the state he has governed for 12 of the last 14 years, and you can tell he's something more than that. Last weekend, two weeks away from claiming the Democratic presidential nomination, Clinton took an evening off from the campaign to look in on two programs he had helped launch as governor.
BUSINESS
April 3, 1992 | By Susan Q. Stranahan, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A row of Raggedy Anns and Andys sit patiently awaiting their maker, as do a stack of pastel afghans. Scattered around the large room, dimmed now by brown paper covering the front windows, are boxes of potholders, mittens, bibs - evidence that age does not idle the hands of many. After 32 years, Elder Craftsmen of Philadelphia closed its doors at 1628 Walnut St. on Tuesday. With it went a peculiar institution, born of blue-blood do-gooderism, a victim of 1990s economics. The three-story building that housed Elder Craftsmen is up for sale.
NEWS
November 16, 1991 | By David Iams, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the world of collectibles there are some that have a populist image - baseball cards, for instance - and some that do not - like vinaigrettes. Vinaigrettes are small perforated lockets that, decades ago, could be filled with smelling salts or similar aromatic contents. Usually they were worn by the upper classes, according to Charles A. Whitaker, who will be selling a collection of more than a dozen next Saturday in an auction beginning at 10 a.m. at the New Hope Eagle Fire Company on Route 202. "They would take a whiff or two if they had been standing in a group of peasants for too long," Whitaker said yesterday.
NEWS
September 2, 1990 | By Lita Solis-Cohen, Special to The Inquirer
The last two decades have been a boom time for auctions. However, there have been recent signs that the auction may be losing some of its allure. Dealers who had been watching the best items go on the block have recently been able to buy important collections and individual items, and they have been getting more consignments. The Philadelphia Print Shop, for instance, recently obtained a consignment of a large and important private collection of Philadelphia prints and maps, the sort of collection that, if it were in an estate, would probably have gone to auction.
NEWS
April 7, 1990 | By David Iams, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Freeman/Fine Arts April gallery sale, timed to coincide with the Philadelphia Antiques Show and featuring a previously unpublished illustration by N.C. Wyeth, will be the firm's biggest to date. With a single consignment of 82 paintings listed in a separate catalogue, the sale, on April 19, 20 and 21, actually will consist of two auctions. "It would really take two or three trips here to see it all," said Richard DeWyngaert, head of the Freeman/ Fine Arts painting department, as he toured the gallery at 1808 Chestnut St. yesterday.
NEWS
January 21, 1990 | By Kitty Baker, Special to The Inquirer
The Taj Mahal, a poem of adoration exquisitely shaped in marble more than 300 years ago, lures many tourists to this country, but it intrigued me less than another attraction, the drama of religious devotion performed daily along the Ganges in this ancient city. In the Sanskrit of 1200 B.C., the city was known as Kasi. In 3,000 years the name changed to Kashi, to Benares and now Varanasi. By whatever name, the city has always existed as a holy place for devout Hindus and was already old when Rome was founded in 753 B.C. At Varanasi the Ganges swings gracefully west for four miles, forming a haven for more than 100 ghats (riverfront stairways)
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