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Constituency

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NEWS
March 8, 1988 | By Ellen Goodman
I am sitting on a podium next to Barney Rosenzweig when the producer of Cagney and Lacey refers to his television audience as a "constituency of 30 million viewers. " The discussion moves on, but my mind sticks on that phrase. A "constituency of viewers"? My dictionary defines a "constituency" as a body of voters. By all accounts it is a political word. But the producer has used it deliberately in describing his campaign for entertainment victories. People, he says, vote with their fingers every week.
NEWS
February 28, 2012 | By Laurie Kellman and Jennifer Agiesta, Associated Press
Washington - It's looking as if President Obama may be back in women's good graces. His support dropped among this critical constituency just before the year began and the presidential campaign got under way in earnest. But his standing with female voters is strengthening, polls show, as the economy improves and as social issues, including birth control, become a bigger part of the nation's political discourse. "Republicans are making a big mistake with this contraception talk, and I'm pretty sure that they are giving [the election]
NEWS
October 10, 2002
SO THE NEW JERSEY Supreme Court didn't want to deny the voting public a "choice. " I guess they forgot that people in New Jersey can vote for whoever the hell they want - it's called a write-in ballot. Of course Democrats know the bulk of their constituency couldn't handle that concept, so they would rather subvert plainly written election laws and completely erase their own primary, ironically denying Democrats who happen to despise Frank Lautenberg the chance to vote for a party nominee.
NEWS
January 8, 1990 | BY W. RUSSELL G. BYERS
Look beyond Mayor Goode for solutions to the city's fiscal problems. As he himself put it: "I'm out of here in two years . . . I don't think it ought to be me driving. " So where do we look? We can't rely on City Council. Ever since Bill Green's last two years in office, Council has done its best to frustrate the mayor. It trashed Goode's trash-to-steam plan and kept the convention center package bottled up for almost two years. It killed Goode's original plan for controlling and properly taxing center-city vendors, and it might just do the same for the mayor's latest effort.
NEWS
October 19, 1995 | By Alexander Cockburn
Identity politics, as they are called, consist of affirming a presence: Here we are. On Monday, Washington saw a highly dignified act of presence by half a million black men. Identity politics begin with autobiography, and in America - one of the most religious countries in the world - that's often where they end, in calls for a personal spiritual odyssey: self-knowledge, self-improvement, a closer walk with God. Black men, summoned to...
NEWS
May 26, 1994 | By Thomas Turcol, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
New Jersey's premier 1994 primary took a critical turn yesterday, when leaders representing a key segment of Republican State Sen. William L. Gormley's political base openly revolted against his campaign for Congress. In a stunning rebuke to Gormley, the longtime GOP power in Atlantic County, leaders of rival Republican factions publicly endorsed State Assemblyman Frank A. LoBiondo, Gormley's opponent in the June 7 congressional primary. They said Gormley had betrayed core Republican principles by "making deals" with Democrats such as former Gov. James J. Florio and by failing to show a longstanding commitment to lower taxes and leaner government.
NEWS
November 5, 1987 | BY ADRIAN LEE
There's this myth about the Last Hurrah. It's supposed to be a sentimental affair: The veteran pol defeated in a last bid for reelection "goes gently into the night" or fades into the sunset. He doffs his hat, and with the echo of that Last Hurrah fading away, just . . . disappears. But as Philadelphia woke yesterday to contemplate its sharply, near-evenly- divided self, the reality was a hell of a sight different. Rizzo was not going gently, serenely. He was going as dictated by his half of the electorate - he was going mutinously and angrily, contesting the exceedingly small margin by which Wilson Goode had won. The same press that battered him unmercifully in the campaign would single him out now as divisive, quarrelsome, responsible for the black-white split in the electorate.
NEWS
November 12, 1987 | BY ADRIAN LEE
Once, Frank Rizzo was asked what would happen if the press's dream of jeering him into obscurity ever came to pass. "Well," responded Rizzo with a grin, 'I guess somebody'd have to call Carmella, and say, 'Come and get the big bum!"
NEWS
August 13, 1989 | By Peggy L. Salvatore, Special to The Inquirer
Joan Finn Tomei finds it a bit peculiar that she would be highlighted in a newspaper story about people who write letters to their legislators. "Just the fact that you are here interviewing me because I write letters, that is very strange for a democracy. In other words, 'She is an unusual person. She writes letters.' That's like somebody in our society going into a house and taking pictures of somebody eating dinner," she said, becoming more emphatic as she spoke. "It should be as commonplace in a democracy as family dinner to communicate with legislators," she said.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
December 2, 2015 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
More than 300 people gathered at Central High School on Monday night to meet Mayor-elect Jim Kenney and tell him what they want for their city. The town-hall meeting was the first of five Kenney will hold this week and brought together a range of people and priorities, many centered on the North Philadelphia community. Some offered ideas: Why not let the state run Philadelphia International Airport? How about a competition that gives tax breaks to the cleanest neighborhoods? Others voiced concerns, largely of a dire need for better schools and safer streets.
NEWS
March 24, 2014 | By Alfred Lubrano and Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writers
The undercover investigation that taped four Philadelphia Democratic legislators and a judge accepting cash or gifts may seem nuanced and complex. But constituents of the stung officials in West Philadelphia and its environs expressed little ambiguity about the morality of officeholders taking payments. "Wrong is wrong, as simple as that," said Marian Thomas, 70, who was walking along 47th Street and Springfield Avenue the other day. Annie Mroz, 23, a University of Pennsylvania graduate student, agreed: "It confirms there's a layer of sleaze in local politics in Philadelphia.
NEWS
June 1, 2013 | By Karen Langley, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
HARRISBURG - A Western Pennsylvania legislator who has tangled with natural gas drillers apologized Thursday for using false names or anonymity when he posted online comments criticizing the industry. State Rep. Jesse White (D., Washington) issued a statement after a Pittsburgh television station reported that industry backers had linked him to an online comment posted in a constituent's name. KDKA reported Wednesday that an industry-funded group had traced anti-drilling posts that appeared under the constituent's name to White's state e-mail address.
NEWS
May 28, 2013
WE COUNT on our leaders to know the difference between right and wrong. But sometimes we wonder. Take, for example, Mark Squilla, who authored a bill just passed by City Council that would allow homeowners protesting their new property values to pay taxes based on the old system. He justified the bill by saying it was unfair to make people pay based on "incorrect" numbers that the Actual Value Initiative produced. We can only assume that Squilla's contention that AVI numbers are not correct is based on complaints from some of his constituents - whose district has seen some of the biggest changes under AVI. So, he's allowing them to choose which number is more "correct" if they appeal their property tax: the old assessment based on the corrupted, outlawed system, or the new assessment, based on the city's efforts to get it right.
NEWS
December 31, 2012 | Matt Katz, Inquirer Staff Writer
As New Jersey Democrats search for a savior to lead them back to the comfy confines of the governor's mansion in Princeton, Republicans have theirs in Chris Christie. And his campaign for reelection is well under way. Christie has announced his intention to run for reelection in 2013, and he will formally launch a campaign next year. Yet he is already trying to secure support in key demographics - like labor and Latinos - to give him a head start in beating back a Democratic challenge in this blue state.
NEWS
October 27, 2012 | By Jessica Parks, Inquirer Staff Writer
Montgomery County hopes to revolutionize the way constituents connect with county services. A new program aims to streamline services for residents, who often need help from multiple agencies and are at a loss about where to begin. "There are people who just don't know what to do. Or people who've been told five different things and not been successful," said Eric Goldstein, director of the Behavioral Health/Developmental Disabilities Department. Instead of the typical "silo" approach - in which each department works in isolation and constituents must figure out the system on their own - the county wants to have a one-stop shop in each community where a constituent could speak to a single person.
NEWS
February 28, 2012 | By Laurie Kellman and Jennifer Agiesta, Associated Press
Washington - It's looking as if President Obama may be back in women's good graces. His support dropped among this critical constituency just before the year began and the presidential campaign got under way in earnest. But his standing with female voters is strengthening, polls show, as the economy improves and as social issues, including birth control, become a bigger part of the nation's political discourse. "Republicans are making a big mistake with this contraception talk, and I'm pretty sure that they are giving [the election]
NEWS
November 25, 2011
What gave U.S. Rep. Rob Andrews (D., N.J.) the nerve to use his campaign fund to buy $463 worth of china for a donor when he represents a district with so many residents who can't put a decent meal on the table? The china was part of $9,000 that Andrews charged his campaign account for an Edinburgh, Scotland, leg of a family trip to Europe. His lame excuse for spending campaign money was that he attended the wedding of a "donor," which makes you wonder how all his donors who didn't get china place settings feel.
NEWS
November 25, 2011 | By Matt York and Bob Christie, Associated Press
TUCSON, Ariz. - Rep. Gabrielle Giffords helped serve a Thanksgiving meal to service members and retirees at a military base in her hometown of Tucson, Ariz. Giffords arrived in the dining hall at Davis-Monthan Air Force Base at midday Thursday wearing a ball cap and an apron with her nickname of "Gabby" sewn on the front. She was accompanied by her retired astronaut husband, Mark Kelly, who also donned an apron. Giffords used only her left hand as she served, a sign that physical damage remains from the injuries she suffered when she was shot.
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