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NEWS
September 22, 2003
What's the most important message visitors could take away from the National Constutition Center? The answer might be as varied as the thousands - Americans and foreign visitors alike - who tour the new interactive museum on Philadelphia's Independence Mall. But an overriding theme of the center is the importance of citizen participation - specifically, to vote. It's no accident, then, that visitors are invited to linger at a "citizens' cafe" where they can tap into computers to research legislation, e-mail lawmakers, or read voter guides.
NEWS
August 19, 2012 | BY JAN RANSOM, Daily News Staff Writer
D AVID EISNER, president and chief executive officer of the National Constitution Center since November 2009, announced Friday that he'll step down Oct. 31. "It's the right time," Eisner said. "I got some big ideas. " Eisner, who oversaw the center's FREEDOM! Initiative - an effort to increase awareness of the center around the nation - said only that his next step would be in the realm of civic engagement with a focus on strengthening the culture of democracy. "I feel so grateful and honored to have been able to lead such an amazing institution," Eisner said.
BUSINESS
August 18, 2012 | INQUIRER STAFF
The president and CEO of the National Constitution Center announced Friday that he will be stepping down, effective Oct. 31. David Eisner, who was president and CEO for nearly three years, will stay on to present the 2012 Liberty Medal to Muhammad Ali on Sept. 13 and to open the Constitution Center's exhibition about Prohibition on Oct. 19, according to a news release issued by the center Friday. He also will assist in the search for a new chief for the center. "The National Constitution Center has made significant progress in establishing itself as a regional and national attraction, and this is the right time for me to step aside," Eisner said in the statement.
NEWS
March 6, 1998 | By David Boldt
Last Wednesday marked the 201st anniversary of one of the more inspirational little moments in American history. It wasn't an act of great valor or rhetorical flourish. Instead, it was a play of manners following the inauguration in Philadelphia of John Adams as the second President of the United States. Thomas Jefferson, the newly sworn-in vice president, stepped back at the doorway of Congress Hall to allow Washington, the former president, to precede him. Washington declined the deference, remarking that he was now just an ordinary citizen.
NEWS
October 18, 2012 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Culture Writer
rFor almost a century, suffragettes, preachers, populists, presidential candidates, progressives, conservatives, and even the Ku Klux Klan, all railed against the evils of drink. Eliminate "spiritous liquors" and, like magic, wife-beaters, vagrants, unruly workers, and swarthy foreigners would all be wiped away, cleansing America of moral and alien scourges. Thus the passage, in 1919, of the 18th Amendment to the Constitution and the onset of Prohibition. But it didn't quite work out that way. Instead, an era of flappers and gangsters, speakeasies and massive federal law enforcement bum-rushed the country headlong into the Great Depression.
NEWS
December 7, 2012 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The top spot belonged first to a Bush and then to a Clinton. Now, in a familiar American formula, the National Constitution Center is turning again to a Bush. The center announced Thursday that former Florida Gov. John Ellis "Jeb" Bush had been elected chairman of its board of trustees. Bush, 59, who runs an education foundation and who has been mentioned as a possible 2016 presidential candidate in a theoretical race against Hillary Rodham Clinton, will succeed former President Bill Clinton, who has served as chairman since January 2009.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 14, 2012 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
Toward the end of the National Constitution Center exhibit "From Asbury Park to the Promised Land: The Life and Music of Bruce Springsteen," which opens on Friday, there's a section called Book of Dreams. To get there, you walk by the 1960 Chevrolet Corvette that Springsteen bought in 1975 after the success of Born to Run , and pass through rooms lined with fliers advertising gigs by early Springsteen bands like Steel Mill and Dr. Zoom & the Sonic Boom. There are trophies like the 1994 best-song Oscar for "Streets of Philadelphia," and artifacts such as the jeans and T-shirt the Boss wore on the cover of 1984's Born in the U.S.A.
NEWS
June 23, 2000
The National Constitution Center is not only finding where the bodies are buried; it's finding the money to build something splendid over where the bodies once were. As archaeologists dug into Independence Mall this week to prepare the way for this long-struggling, now-blossoming project, they found the graves of 15 Colonial Americans. They had been overlooked when the old Second Presbyterian Church moved its burial ground on what is now the Mall to Mount Vernon Cemetery in 1867.
NEWS
February 9, 2007 | By Larry Eichel INQUIRER SENIOR WRITER
The National Constitution Center has obtained a rare copy of the Emancipation Proclamation, signed by Abraham Lincoln, that will go on display next week and be part of the center's collection for the next 10 years. The printing is one of the so-called Leland-Boker editions of the proclamation, produced in 1864 for sale at the Philadelphia Great Central Sanitary Fair to raise money for sick and wounded Union soldiers. Forty-eight copies were made; 22 are known to be still in existence, with four held by other institutions in the city.
NEWS
November 19, 2002 | By Stephan Salisbury INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
They may not see eye to eye on a lot, but liberal Richard Dreyfuss and conservative Jeane J. Kirkpatrick find common cause on one thing - the U.S. Constitution. "I'm a great fan," said Kirkpatrick, former U.N. ambassador during the Reagan administration from 1981 to 1985. "Certainly the ideas of America, as represented in the Constitution and the Bill of Rights, are something we are together on," said actor Dreyfuss. "It's not surprising to me at all. " "One of the strengths of the Constitution is that it was clearly designed to stimulate a government under which people of quite different points of view could live," said Kirkpatrick in a recent telephone interview from her Washington, D.C., office.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 8, 2014 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jeffrey Rosen, author, constitutional law professor, and president and chief executive officer of the National Constitution Center, may have hit upon a novel idea. At a time when public debate over the central constitutional and political issues of the day has devolved into a dispiriting swamp of   ad hominem attacks, misleading ad campaigns, and television shouting matches, Rosen says there is a public hunger for civilized, respectful conversation. Since taking over at the center last year, he has organized a series of public forums featuring prominent guests from the political right and left to unravel weighty and emotional issues, from gun control to the use of drone strikes, within the context of constitutional law. Give Rosen half a chance and he waxes rhapsodic about the nation's founding documents.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 19, 2014 | BY LAUREN McCUTCHEON, Daily News Staff Writer mccutch@phillynews.com, 215-854-5991
FIRST THINGS FIRST. Here in Philly, we spell our signature sandwich in one word, not two. We sometimes shorten it to "steak. " You, know, like "Angel. " Or Whoopi. (We don't call it a "Philly. " You shouldn't, either.) Steak slingers operate all over town. They ply their wares "wit" or "witout" sauteed onions, with cheese - usually sharp provolone or gooey goldish "Whiz," as in "Cheez. " Add hot peppers for free. Here's a list of where to find 'em, in order of closest to the Con.   Really close * READING TERMINAL Gotta get one for breakfast?
NEWS
November 13, 2013 | By Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
For John Campbell, it was a trip to the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington that inspired him to spend nearly a decade chronicling the lives of the 43 soldiers and sailors from Gloucester County who died in the war. That day in the early 1990s, the Vietnam vet found himself staring at the Wall. "I saw all those names," Campbell said. He felt he owed it to each of those men to tell his story. Campbell was one of many veterans and others who spent Veterans Day at the National Constitution Center, honoring those who served with words of reflection.
NEWS
October 11, 2013 | BY DAVID MAIALETTI, maialed@phillynews.com, 215-854-5143
THERE IS something refreshing in the bare-bones approach to the new exhibition at the National Constitution Center, "Capture The Moment: The Pulitzer Prize Photographs. " White walls. Black frames. Very little text. It's every photojournalist's dream. Curator Cyma Rubin gives the more than 150 images center stage, allowing the viewer to absorb their content without distraction. A fitting choice, since the images contain some of the most important moments of their time. The show includes every winner since the Pulitzer Prize board began awarding the photography prize in 1942.
NEWS
October 11, 2013 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
The first image in the exhibition of Pulitzer Prize-winning photographs set to open at the National Constitution Center on Friday bears an all-too-familiar intensity. A pair of Syrian snipers, holed up in a dim room, lasers of daylight streaming through bullet holes all around them, nervously watch for their next target. Javier Manzano, freelancing for Agence France-Presse, the photographer who captured the intimacy, anxiety, and strange beauty in this image, later said, "I didn't know it was a sniper's nest.
NEWS
September 21, 2013 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
With her tortoiseshell glasses, gentle demeanor, and quavering voice, Ruth Bader Ginsburg projects the quintessence of judicial demeanor and focused academic intensity. Yet when she slowly, and it seemed carefully, entered the second-floor auditorium of the National Constitution Center on Sept. 6 for a talk about the modern Supreme Court and its discontents, the 800 or more spectators in attendance greeted her like a rock star. They whooped with shouts of approval and encouragement as she took the stage - an infrequent reception for a cloistered and composed associate justice of the U.S. Supreme Court.
NEWS
September 8, 2013 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, in a 90-minute talk Friday evening at the National Constitution Center, gave a vigorous defense of activist government that provides for the basic health care and economic well-being of its citizens. Ginsburg, leader of the court's liberal wing, spoke at length about the ideological tenor of the court, her views on the court's recent decision to strike down a key section of the Voting Rights Act, and her long-standing friendship with Justice Antonin G. Scalia, the acknowledged standard-bearer for the court's conservatives.
NEWS
July 8, 2013 | By Karen Heller, Inquirer Columnist
At times, it has seemed that the Constitution has held up far better during more than 200 years than the National Constitution Center has over a decade. Jeffrey Rosen recently became the center's sixth president and chief executive. Or possibly its fifth. No one is sure whether to count interim and repeat directors. The turnover rate in leadership, coupled with bewildering programming - exhibits on Princess Diana, Bruce Springsteen - left the center with a confused mission and disappointing results.
NEWS
June 25, 2013 | BY JESSICA GLAZER, Daily News Staff Writer glazerj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5907
FORMER PRESIDENT Bill Clinton will return to the National Constitution Center tomorrow. The first time Clinton set foot at the center was in 2000 when, as president, he led the Pledge of Allegiance at the building's groundbreaking ceremony. The upcoming visit will be more substantive. The event is the last of the four so-called "National Dialogues" organized by a group called the State Budget Crisis Task Force that will focus on federalism. That's the government system that gives states the independence - and burden - of managing big-ticket items such as public infrastructure, education, health care and public safety.
NEWS
May 26, 2013 | By Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Several hundred people flocked to Center City on Saturday afternoon to join voices around the world in protesting genetically modified food and Monsanto, the agricultural corporation that is a leading producer of engineered seeds. "March Against Monsanto" took place in more than 250 cities around the country, as well as in more around the world, organizers said. Monsanto Co., based in St. Louis, said Saturday that it respects people's rights to express their opinions, but maintains that its seeds improve agriculture by helping farmers produce more from their land while conserving resources such as water and energy.
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