CollectionsConstitution Center
IN THE NEWS

Constitution Center

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
September 22, 2003
What's the most important message visitors could take away from the National Constutition Center? The answer might be as varied as the thousands - Americans and foreign visitors alike - who tour the new interactive museum on Philadelphia's Independence Mall. But an overriding theme of the center is the importance of citizen participation - specifically, to vote. It's no accident, then, that visitors are invited to linger at a "citizens' cafe" where they can tap into computers to research legislation, e-mail lawmakers, or read voter guides.
NEWS
August 19, 2012 | BY JAN RANSOM, Daily News Staff Writer
D AVID EISNER, president and chief executive officer of the National Constitution Center since November 2009, announced Friday that he'll step down Oct. 31. "It's the right time," Eisner said. "I got some big ideas. " Eisner, who oversaw the center's FREEDOM! Initiative - an effort to increase awareness of the center around the nation - said only that his next step would be in the realm of civic engagement with a focus on strengthening the culture of democracy. "I feel so grateful and honored to have been able to lead such an amazing institution," Eisner said.
BUSINESS
August 18, 2012 | INQUIRER STAFF
The president and CEO of the National Constitution Center announced Friday that he will be stepping down, effective Oct. 31. David Eisner, who was president and CEO for nearly three years, will stay on to present the 2012 Liberty Medal to Muhammad Ali on Sept. 13 and to open the Constitution Center's exhibition about Prohibition on Oct. 19, according to a news release issued by the center Friday. He also will assist in the search for a new chief for the center. "The National Constitution Center has made significant progress in establishing itself as a regional and national attraction, and this is the right time for me to step aside," Eisner said in the statement.
NEWS
March 6, 1998 | By David Boldt
Last Wednesday marked the 201st anniversary of one of the more inspirational little moments in American history. It wasn't an act of great valor or rhetorical flourish. Instead, it was a play of manners following the inauguration in Philadelphia of John Adams as the second President of the United States. Thomas Jefferson, the newly sworn-in vice president, stepped back at the doorway of Congress Hall to allow Washington, the former president, to precede him. Washington declined the deference, remarking that he was now just an ordinary citizen.
NEWS
October 18, 2012 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Culture Writer
rFor almost a century, suffragettes, preachers, populists, presidential candidates, progressives, conservatives, and even the Ku Klux Klan, all railed against the evils of drink. Eliminate "spiritous liquors" and, like magic, wife-beaters, vagrants, unruly workers, and swarthy foreigners would all be wiped away, cleansing America of moral and alien scourges. Thus the passage, in 1919, of the 18th Amendment to the Constitution and the onset of Prohibition. But it didn't quite work out that way. Instead, an era of flappers and gangsters, speakeasies and massive federal law enforcement bum-rushed the country headlong into the Great Depression.
NEWS
December 7, 2012 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The top spot belonged first to a Bush and then to a Clinton. Now, in a familiar American formula, the National Constitution Center is turning again to a Bush. The center announced Thursday that former Florida Gov. John Ellis "Jeb" Bush had been elected chairman of its board of trustees. Bush, 59, who runs an education foundation and who has been mentioned as a possible 2016 presidential candidate in a theoretical race against Hillary Rodham Clinton, will succeed former President Bill Clinton, who has served as chairman since January 2009.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 14, 2012 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
Toward the end of the National Constitution Center exhibit "From Asbury Park to the Promised Land: The Life and Music of Bruce Springsteen," which opens on Friday, there's a section called Book of Dreams. To get there, you walk by the 1960 Chevrolet Corvette that Springsteen bought in 1975 after the success of Born to Run , and pass through rooms lined with fliers advertising gigs by early Springsteen bands like Steel Mill and Dr. Zoom & the Sonic Boom. There are trophies like the 1994 best-song Oscar for "Streets of Philadelphia," and artifacts such as the jeans and T-shirt the Boss wore on the cover of 1984's Born in the U.S.A.
NEWS
June 23, 2000
The National Constitution Center is not only finding where the bodies are buried; it's finding the money to build something splendid over where the bodies once were. As archaeologists dug into Independence Mall this week to prepare the way for this long-struggling, now-blossoming project, they found the graves of 15 Colonial Americans. They had been overlooked when the old Second Presbyterian Church moved its burial ground on what is now the Mall to Mount Vernon Cemetery in 1867.
NEWS
February 9, 2007 | By Larry Eichel INQUIRER SENIOR WRITER
The National Constitution Center has obtained a rare copy of the Emancipation Proclamation, signed by Abraham Lincoln, that will go on display next week and be part of the center's collection for the next 10 years. The printing is one of the so-called Leland-Boker editions of the proclamation, produced in 1864 for sale at the Philadelphia Great Central Sanitary Fair to raise money for sick and wounded Union soldiers. Forty-eight copies were made; 22 are known to be still in existence, with four held by other institutions in the city.
NEWS
November 19, 2002 | By Stephan Salisbury INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
They may not see eye to eye on a lot, but liberal Richard Dreyfuss and conservative Jeane J. Kirkpatrick find common cause on one thing - the U.S. Constitution. "I'm a great fan," said Kirkpatrick, former U.N. ambassador during the Reagan administration from 1981 to 1985. "Certainly the ideas of America, as represented in the Constitution and the Bill of Rights, are something we are together on," said actor Dreyfuss. "It's not surprising to me at all. " "One of the strengths of the Constitution is that it was clearly designed to stimulate a government under which people of quite different points of view could live," said Kirkpatrick in a recent telephone interview from her Washington, D.C., office.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 10, 2016 | By Alfred Lubrano, Staff Writer
Richard R. Beeman, 74, a University of Pennsylvania historian and a trustee of the National Constitution Center, who revered America's founding document and spent decades teaching its creation and complexities, died Monday, Sept. 5, of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), also known as Lou Gehrig's disease. Dr. Beeman, of Moylan, was the John Welsh Centennial Professor of History at Penn, where he was a faculty member for 43 years. "It has been my great privilege during those years to teach thousands of bright Penn undergraduates and graduate students the subject I love - the history of the American Revolution and Constitution," Dr. Beeman wrote on his website.
NEWS
July 29, 2016
Everyone on staff is helping our celebrity spotting during the DNC. Here are some more highlights: From Elizabeth Wellington : BET Networks and Airbnb hosted a DNC soiree Tuesday night at Coda nightclub (1712 Walnut St.). The jawn - the official name of the party - was packed. Singers Bilal and Raheem Devaughn entertained the well-dressed, packed-to-capacity crowd. The Daily Show host Trevor Noah milled through the space like he was everybody's homeboy along with one of the show's funniest correspondents, Roy Wood Jr. (The two are at Penn's Annenberg Center taping the show.)
SPORTS
May 25, 2016 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, STAFF WRITER
The two aging contracts are unremarkable on first glance, devoid of flourishes and filled with the boilerplate restrictions that chained all baseball players to their teams in the Reserve Clause era. It isn't until the dates and signatures are evident that it becomes clear why these documents - two thin sheets of paper whose historical heft belies their fragility - have been appraised at $36 million. They are the groundbreaking contracts that Jackie Robinson signed when he shattered baseball's long-entrenched color barrier and changed American society forever.
NEWS
May 5, 2016 | By Stephan Salisbury, Culture Writer
The homeless Civil War Museum of Philadelphia, steward of what scholars regard as one of the finest collections of Civil War materials anywhere but possessing no place to display them, reached an agreement Monday to transfer ownership of its roughly 3,000 artifacts to the Gettysburg Foundation, the private, nonprofit partner of the National Park Service. At the same time, the National Constitution Center on Independence Mall has agreed to mount a permanent exhibition exploring the constitutional impact of the Civil War, using artifacts drawn from what is now the foundation's Gettysburg collection.
NEWS
April 27, 2016 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, STAFF WRITER
Should Hillary Clinton all but clinch the Democratic nomination when the polls close Tuesday, she will not then bend over backwards, or even moderately it seems, by adopting any of her opponent Sen. Bernie Sanders' proposals to win over his base, she said Monday. "Let's look at where we are right now. . . . I am winning," Clinton told MSNBC's Rachel Maddow and a crowd of about 200 people gathered for a town hall at the National Constitution Center. "And I am winning because of what I stand for. " Sanders, in his own town hall before the same crowd but a different host, Chris Hayes, said Clinton would have to reconsider that stance if she is to win over those who have emphatically backed him as the anti-establishment candidate.
NEWS
February 27, 2016 | By Jason Nark, Staff Writer
It took less than 27 minutes for Donald Trump's name to be spoken aloud during a program on the history of the presidential primary process Thursday afternoon at the National Constitution Center. "In some ways, Donald Trump is talked about as the unfiltered candidate, the one who doesn't think about what he says before he says it, who doesn't rely on the consultants to craft every remark," said presidential historian David Greenberg, a professor of history, journalism, and media studies at Rutgers University.
NEWS
February 10, 2016 | BY JACK TOMCZUK, Staff Writer
THE NATIONAL Constitution Center is holding four contests - on themes dealing with the nation's founding document - for teachers and students in Philadelphia and the Mid-Atlantic region. A total of almost $200,000 will be awarded to the winners of the competitions, which will focus on developing students' knowledge of the Constitution and the nation's framers. The Civic Literary Contest will provide $100,000 to a city public or private school whose teachers create the best multiyear lesson plan using the center's Interactive Constitution tool.
NEWS
February 10, 2016 | By Jack Tomczuk, Staff Writer
The National Constitution Center is holding four contests - on themes dealing with the nation's founding document - for teachers and students in Philadelphia and the mid-Atlantic region. A total of almost $200,000 will be awarded to the winners of the competitions, which will focus on developing students' knowledge of the Constitution and the nation's framers. The Civic Literary Contest will provide $100,000 to a city public or private school whose teachers create the best multiyear lesson plan using the center's Interactive Constitution tool.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 2016
THURSDAY EVENING I attended the 150th anniversary of Einstein Healthcare at the Constitution Center, the gala celebrating the Jewish hospital's commitment to their patients of all backgrounds in the Philadelphia area. The evening was spectacular as "Seinfeld" star Jason Alexander hosted and original diva Diana Ross sang her hits. The hall was filled with well-dressed ladies and gentlemen and everyone danced and sang along.
NEWS
January 14, 2016 | By Stephan Salisbury, CULTURE WRITER
On Tuesday, the National Constitution Center will close its Sidney Kimmel Theater for the first phase of an overhaul of both the theater and the live production Freedom Rising , the center's multimedia centerpiece. On Feb. 9, the theater will reopen, only to close again from April 14 to June 12. When it reopens the week of June 13 - in time for the Democratic National Convention, convening here in July - theater and production will be completely upgraded, both technologically and thematically, said Jeffrey Rosen, center president and chief executive.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|