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Constitution Party

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BUSINESS
August 25, 1986 | By Larry Fish, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia is throwing a birthday party for the U.S. Constitution next year and inviting the world, but it doesn't plan to spend a great deal for the invitations. The guest of honor is the Constitution, but this party is really a product, to benefit mainly the host. After all, the Constitution usually gets pretty good press, but Philadelphia hasn't had the same experience lately. Creating the product is mostly the job of the organizing committee, We the People 200. Selling the product is almost solely the job of the Philadelphia Convention and Visitors Bureau, which will be working from a budget essentially unchanged from this year's.
NEWS
August 8, 2004 | By Carrie Budoff and Thomas Fitzgerald INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
James Clymer entered Pennsylvania's U.S. Senate race last week as a third-party candidate with scant name recognition, no campaign manager, and just $55,000 to spend. He might seem to be a minor player, but his young candidacy left the state Republican Party weighing a court challenge and the Democratic candidate, U.S. Rep. Joseph Hoeffel, cheering Clymer's arrival. The attention stems from two pillars of his campaign. Running on the Constitution Party ticket, Clymer would be the only antiabortion candidate in the race, a position that brings an instant base of support.
NEWS
August 18, 2004
Reasons for voting for the Constitution Party Thank you for the Aug. 7 article by Carrie Budoff and Thomas Fitzgerald on the U.S. Senate candidacy of Jim Clymer of the Constitution Party. Unfortunately, the article did not mention the reason that I (a former Republican state committeeman) and many others will be voting for him and the Constitution Party in November. Unlike the Democrats and Republicans, the Constitution Party believes that the Constitution should be followed and, in particular, that wars should be declared by Congress before being fought by the executive branch.
NEWS
October 28, 2004 | By Amy Worden INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Republican Sen. Arlen Specter is seeking a fifth term based on what he says is his considerable congressional clout. His Democratic challenger, U.S. Rep. Joseph M. Hoeffel, is campaigning as an advocate for what he calls the state's forgotten working people. Specter, 74, a career moderate, stresses his Senate seniority. As chairman of the appropriations subcommittee on health and education, he helped bring a record $400 million in federal funding to Pennsylvania last year for hospitals, schools and transportation projects.
NEWS
August 10, 2004
A GRASSROOTS movement can sometimes turn out to be an Astro Turf joke. It looks real at first. But on closer inspection - and frankly, you don't have to look too hard - some of this year's politicians are strange bedfellows indeed. Let's see . . . A local Democratic Senate candidate unabashedly supports a conservative Constitution Party candidate for the same job. Nationally, Republicans ride the bandwagon of pesky independent presidential candidate Ralph Nader, while Democrats are working hard to steer that wagon into a deep ditch.
NEWS
August 22, 1996 | By Christian Davenport, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
It was the climax of the Republican National Convention. Bob Dole accepted his party's nomination under glaring lights before a national prime-time audience and scores of cheering delegates. Kathy Coll wanted no part of it. After her delegate's seat was revoked by state Republican Party officials the week before the convention, Coll rejected the hoopla, along with an offer by party officials to return her credentials if she agreed to several conditions. "It's meaningless; it's like going to a banquet after the meal is over and looking at an empty plate," Coll said.
NEWS
August 2, 2003 | By Leonard N. Fleming and Thomas Fitzgerald INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
John P. McDermott says he's no stooge for Mayor Street's reelection campaign. But that's how operatives for Sam Katz described the Constitution Party candidate yesterday after he filed his 3,731 signatures to qualify to run for mayor. The underlying assertion is that McDermott, a 52-year-old white man from Northeast Philadelphia, was set up by the Street campaign to steal away potential white voters and ensure the mayor, who is black and popular among that racial demographic, a sound victory.
NEWS
September 5, 2012 | By Ben Pershing, Washington Post
Former Rep. Virgil Goode has qualified for the presidential ballot in Virginia, the State Board of Elections ruled Tuesday, adding a potential obstacle to Republican Mitt Romney's hopes of winning the pivotal state. The state Republican Party has challenged the eligibility of Goode, who is the Constitution Party's nominee, and could still get him knocked off the ballot. Goode served in Congress as a Democrat, an independent, and then a Republican before losing his southwest Virginia seat in 2008.
NEWS
August 23, 2004
If Ralph Nader makes it onto the ballot in Pennsylvania as an independent candidate for president, he ought to get there fair and square. The Democratic Party is playing hardball by taking the Nader campaign to court. If Nader has played by the rules, his candidacy will withstand the challenge to his nominating petitions. Confession time: We wish Nader would quit the race. He was a spoiler in the 2000 campaign, and he can't possibly win this election, either. Most polls show him with 2 or 3 percent support.
NEWS
October 22, 1996
In 1992, the independent-minded voters of Bucks County elected Republican Jim Greenwood to Congress, even as they were turning against President Bush. This year, the key question is simple: Has Mr. Greenwood stayed the kind of thoughtful, independent-minded lawmaker whom voters chose four years ago, or has he veered right into Gingrichland? On one critical test, fiscal responsibility, this Republican passes with ease. He is an outspoken critic of Pentagon extravagances such as the B-2 bomber, the Seawolf submarine, and space-based missile defense.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 25, 2012
WITH SUMMER in the rearview mirror, conventional wisdom predicts that you are now paying attention to politics until we have the "most important" presidential election ever. I know it is the "most important" because both sides tell me that. Four years ago was just a game of jacks, with Barack Obama and John McCain both standing on the deck of a torpedoed economy. Since this is the Philadelphia Daily News , most readers are Democrats. (With the aid of the Internet, we reach some people who still cling to their guns and their religion, but we're not sure "those" people even know how to read.)
NEWS
September 5, 2012 | By Ben Pershing, Washington Post
Former Rep. Virgil Goode has qualified for the presidential ballot in Virginia, the State Board of Elections ruled Tuesday, adding a potential obstacle to Republican Mitt Romney's hopes of winning the pivotal state. The state Republican Party has challenged the eligibility of Goode, who is the Constitution Party's nominee, and could still get him knocked off the ballot. Goode served in Congress as a Democrat, an independent, and then a Republican before losing his southwest Virginia seat in 2008.
NEWS
August 28, 2012
IT'S A SAFE bet we'll be hearing a lot of talk about freedom from the podium at the Republican National Convention in Tampa this week, assuming that Tropical Storm Isaac doesn't linger over the Tampa Bay Times Center and wash the GOP delegates out into Hillsborough Bay. But you probably won't hear as much about what the GOP is up to right now in Philadelphia, where angry activists accuse the party of squelching the freedom to vote in Pennsylvania for...
NEWS
August 19, 2012 | Associated Press
HARRISBURG - The state Republican Party is challenging candidate petitions by members of the Constitution and Libertarian Parties, seeking to bounce from the state ballot candidates for president, vice president, and several other offices. Line-by-line reviews of the candidates' petition signatures ordered by a state Commonwealth Court judge will begin Monday at the Philadelphia Board of Elections. Analysts say Republicans are probably worried that conservatives dissatisfied with their presidential candidate, Mitt Romney, will defect to Constitution or Libertarian candidates.
NEWS
August 9, 2012 | By Scott Bomboy, CONSTITUTION DAILY
Bomboy is editor-in-chief of the National Constitution Center A virtually unknown presidential candidate from Virginia could derail Mitt Romney's bid for president. But how rare is it for a third-party candidate to influence a race for president? Currently, Virgil Goode, the Constitution Party's nominee, has about 9 percent of Virginia's projected vote in the upcoming November election, according to polling data. With Mitt Romney needing Virginia - especially if President Barack Obama can take Ohio or Florida - Goode could become the little-known spoiler in the national election.
NEWS
August 4, 2010 | By Joelle Farrell, Inquirer Staff Writer
An independent candidate with a tea-party streak jumped into the Seventh District congressional race this week, adding a twist to a hotly contested open race that has remained bitter even during the summer doldrums. And the newest candidate, Jim Schneller, a conservative who could siphon votes away from Republican Patrick Meehan this fall, has Democrats to thank for almost half his nearly 8,000 signatures, according to Meehan's campaign. Democratic volunteers, including campaign workers for the Democratic candidate, Bryan Lentz, collected 3,800 signatures for Schneller.
NEWS
October 28, 2004 | By Amy Worden INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Republican Sen. Arlen Specter is seeking a fifth term based on what he says is his considerable congressional clout. His Democratic challenger, U.S. Rep. Joseph M. Hoeffel, is campaigning as an advocate for what he calls the state's forgotten working people. Specter, 74, a career moderate, stresses his Senate seniority. As chairman of the appropriations subcommittee on health and education, he helped bring a record $400 million in federal funding to Pennsylvania last year for hospitals, schools and transportation projects.
NEWS
August 23, 2004
If Ralph Nader makes it onto the ballot in Pennsylvania as an independent candidate for president, he ought to get there fair and square. The Democratic Party is playing hardball by taking the Nader campaign to court. If Nader has played by the rules, his candidacy will withstand the challenge to his nominating petitions. Confession time: We wish Nader would quit the race. He was a spoiler in the 2000 campaign, and he can't possibly win this election, either. Most polls show him with 2 or 3 percent support.
NEWS
August 18, 2004
Reasons for voting for the Constitution Party Thank you for the Aug. 7 article by Carrie Budoff and Thomas Fitzgerald on the U.S. Senate candidacy of Jim Clymer of the Constitution Party. Unfortunately, the article did not mention the reason that I (a former Republican state committeeman) and many others will be voting for him and the Constitution Party in November. Unlike the Democrats and Republicans, the Constitution Party believes that the Constitution should be followed and, in particular, that wars should be declared by Congress before being fought by the executive branch.
NEWS
August 10, 2004
A GRASSROOTS movement can sometimes turn out to be an Astro Turf joke. It looks real at first. But on closer inspection - and frankly, you don't have to look too hard - some of this year's politicians are strange bedfellows indeed. Let's see . . . A local Democratic Senate candidate unabashedly supports a conservative Constitution Party candidate for the same job. Nationally, Republicans ride the bandwagon of pesky independent presidential candidate Ralph Nader, while Democrats are working hard to steer that wagon into a deep ditch.
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