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NEWS
July 24, 2015 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
For the guys at Longo's Auto Sales in Collingswood, the Route 130 project can't end soon enough. "We went from selling 25 cars a month to 12," says owner Jim Longo. Adds salesman Bob Hartley, who works on commission: "You can't print my opinion of the project. " To say Longo's "overlooks" the $31 million makeover of 130 between the PATCO viaduct and North Park Drive doesn't begin to convey the used-car lot's proximity to three years of disruptive construction. Not to mention, traffic jams: About 65,000 vehicles per day thunder through this stretch of 130, often backing up south to the White Horse Pike and north to the (former)
NEWS
October 7, 2006 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A group of property owners trying to preserve a coastal anomaly known as the Avalon High Dunes has sued a Pennsylvania potato chip magnate, the borough and New Jersey's Department of Environmental Protection in its latest effort to halt construction of the chip king's 14,000-square-foot beach mansion. At the same time, Utz Quality Foods president Michael Rice has sued Avalon for denying his application to add one more luxurious amenity to his Dune Drive property - a large swimming pool.
NEWS
July 14, 1986 | By KEVIN HANEY, Daily News Staff Writer
Schuylkill Expressway drivers will be forced to endure another season of construction delays next year in the Vine Street interchange area, according to PennDOT officials. PennDOT district engineer Robert L. Rowland said today that the contractor working in that area this year is 10 weeks behind schedule on the job. That, said Rowland, means the contractor will be returning to the interchange area next year to finish the job. The contractor, a joint venture of Morrison-Knudsen Corp.
NEWS
November 8, 1987 | By Dianne Herrin, Special to The Inquirer
Downingtown Senior High School administrators are working to alleviate disruptions caused by a $2.9 million renovation and expansion project under way at the school. Construction in the high school's library and cafeteria is causing severe parking problems, and because construction forced the closing of the cafeteria, students have had to bring in food and eat in the gym since the first day of school. On Oct. 26, the school started serving lunch in the gym. Main dishes such as sandwiches, pizza, hoagies and cheeseburgers, plus a vegetable, soup, drinks and dessert, will be offered until early March, when construction is expected to be finished and the full-service cafeteria back in operation.
NEWS
January 29, 1989 | By Karen K. Gress, Special to The Inquirer
The Coatesville Area School District approved a contract Thursday with the Wagner Group Inc. to plan seven major construction projects that will cost between $25 million and $30 million over the next five years. Roger McGuigan, chairman of the district's buildings and grounds committee, said the school district would pay between $4 million and $5 million to the Reading firm to design plans to upgrade existing buildings and oversee the building of new ones to meet enrollment growth.
SPORTS
September 28, 2007
Eagles fans heading to Sunday night's game at Giants Stadium will see drastic changes with the parking situation. Because of construction of the new stadium at the Meadowlands, more than 5,000 parking spaces have been eliminated. All game-day parking is prepaid, permit parking for season ticketholders. Fans without permits will be directed to off-site lots that cost $20. Tailgating is prohibited on the off-site lots. There is free shuttle service to and from the stadium, beginning 4 hours before kickoff and continuing for 1 1/2 hours after the game.
NEWS
April 29, 1993 | By Vyola P. Willson, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
It took 29 years to get from proposal to the pick and shovel, but today it's official. PennDot will start construction on the Exton Bypass today with groundbreaking ceremonies at 10 a.m. near the heart of the problem the bypass is designed to correct - the traffic at the crossroads of Routes 100 and 30 in Exton. State Transportation Secretary Howard Yerusalim and the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation district engineer Stephen B. Lester will officiate as local and state officials gather alongside northbound Route 100, a half-mile south of Route 30 in West Whiteland Township.
NEWS
October 25, 1987 | By Tim Wright, Special to The Inquirer
Valley Township supervisors have approved final plans for two developments with a total of 214 homes. Developers said that construction would begin this fall and that sales would begin in the spring. Approved by 5-0 votes Tuesday were: Country Club Valley, at the southeastern intersection of the Route 30 Bypass and Country Club Road. It will have 92 townhouses and 64 single-family houses. Developer is Ken Hellings of Media. Valley View, adjacent to Country Club Valley on the south.
NEWS
March 20, 1988 | By Meryll Hansen, Special to The Inquirer
East Goshen will have two new traffic-signal systems, and a third might be installed if the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation's traffic counts indicate sufficient need. At a supervisors meeting Tuesday, Chairman Anthony G. Iacovelli opened sealed bids for construction of a traffic light at Reservoir Road and Paoli Pike. He said a contract would be awarded to the lowest bidder, Lenni Electric Corp. of Lenni, Del., pending a review by township manager Louis F. Smith. Lenni's bid totaled $41,500.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 24, 2015 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
For the guys at Longo's Auto Sales in Collingswood, the Route 130 project can't end soon enough. "We went from selling 25 cars a month to 12," says owner Jim Longo. Adds salesman Bob Hartley, who works on commission: "You can't print my opinion of the project. " To say Longo's "overlooks" the $31 million makeover of 130 between the PATCO viaduct and North Park Drive doesn't begin to convey the used-car lot's proximity to three years of disruptive construction. Not to mention, traffic jams: About 65,000 vehicles per day thunder through this stretch of 130, often backing up south to the White Horse Pike and north to the (former)
REAL_ESTATE
June 29, 2015 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
There was a time, not very long ago, when the number of unsubsidized, market-rate residential construction projects within the Philadelphia city limits could be counted on one hand. Now, you need a scorecard to keep track, and even that list might need to be updated daily. Noah Ostroff, of Keller Williams Real Estate in Center City, said that, typically, when he gets a call from someone looking to buy a property in the city, it is for new construction. "I don't have many people looking for traditional - what we call 'homes with character,' " he said.
NEWS
May 4, 2015 | By Michaelle Bond, Inquirer Staff Writer
A driver was killed and four construction workers were injured, one seriously, Saturday morning in a crash in a construction zone on the Pennsylvania Turnpike in lower Bucks County. The accident happened just before 5:30 a.m. in the eastbound lanes near the Bensalem Interchange. It closed the eastbound lanes until 11 a.m. The driver of the car, who had not been identified, crashed into a truck carrying construction workers who were picking up traffic cones to reopen a lane closed for overnight work, state police said.
BUSINESS
April 18, 2015 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Bryn Mawr Hospital announced plans Thursday for a $200 million modernization of its campus, including a five-story, 203,000-square-foot patient pavilion with 12 operating rooms and 72 private patient rooms. Bryn Mawr will have 250 inpatient rooms after the project is completed. That is about the same number it uses now. "It's a historic modernization project that takes us to the next chapter for this hospital and this community, but it is clearly on the inpatient side, not a growth strategy," said Andrea Gilbert, president of the hospital.
NEWS
March 31, 2015 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Many dangerous and unsafe buildings that should be inspected every 10 to 30 days have not been seen by inspectors from the Department of Licenses and Inspections in years, The Inquirer has learned. At the same time, the agency's Construction Site Task Force has been so adept at fining contractors for violations such as failing to display permits or update insurance in the city computer system, builders complain, that L&I is delaying construction while city building is booming. Critics of the beleaguered agency say that proves it is on the wrong track, with safety taking a backseat to the exigencies of collecting cash and flexing its muscle over comparatively minor infractions.
NEWS
March 28, 2015 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
SEPTA plans to spend $535 million next year to buy new vehicles, replace and repair rail bridges, upgrade train stations, and begin overhauling its Center City subway concourse. The proposed capital budget for the fiscal year that begins July 1 is $37 million, or 6.4 percent less than the current capital budget, which contained a one-time infusion of $85 million in federal funding. Among the projected spending is about $160 million earmarked to replace and overhaul vehicles. That will include 13 new locomotives, the first of 525 hybrid buses that will be purchased over five years, and the start of procuring about 45 bi-level railcars to increase capacity on the Regional Rail lines.
NEWS
March 22, 2015 | By Kelly Flynn, Inquirer Staff Writer
It's a sunny morning in Bellmawr, but a thunderous boom pierces the air. Then another, and another. The bangs echo for blocks. At nearby businesses, the earth shakes. Photos rattle on walls, startling sleepy residents, but the skies remain clear, because, although it sounds like a storm, Mother Nature has nothing to do with it. The small town, located where Route 42 and I-295 and other thoroughfares converge, is in the midst of construction that has sent residents complaining to their neighbors, their mayor, the New Jersey Department of Transportation - and some to lawyers.
NEWS
March 19, 2015 | By Chris Palmer, Inquirer Staff Writer
A decision will not be made for at least another month on whether to allow construction of a multimillion-dollar theater and museum on the former Bucks County farm of Oscar Hammerstein II, according to the project leader. Will Hammerstein, grandson of the Broadway lyricist and the driving force behind the proposal, said a three-hour Doylestown Township zoning board hearing ended Monday night without a vote. Four witnesses testified, Hammerstein said, but at least two township witnesses are still expected to testify, and a meeting next month is slated to allot significant time for public comment.
BUSINESS
February 16, 2015 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
| Lola Figueroa Clark doesn't have her advanced degree in marketing yet. But at 8 years old, the Mount Airy third grader already knows why construction toy manufacturers like K'nex Brands L.L.C. in Hatfield become so frustrated when marketing to girls. "Boys and girls both like" construction toys, Lola said. "But if you want to look for them in the toy stores, you have to look in the boys' section. " The result? In the growing $1.8 billion building and construction toy market, nearly half the potential buyers (i.e., girls)
NEWS
February 6, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Rev. John L. Wiggins Sr., 86, of Albion, Camden County, a construction company owner who was the founder and longtime pastor of Emmanuel Church of God in Christ in Lawnside, died of complications from Alzheimer's disease Thursday, Jan. 29, at home. "He was a pillar in the historically black community" of Lawnside, daughter Ovetta said. Born in Rocky Mount, N.C., Rev. Wiggins studied in public schools there and worked in mills and on farms and construction sites before moving with his wife, Florence, to Philadelphia in the early 1950s.
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