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Construction Equipment

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NEWS
March 11, 1995 | By David Iams, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Every bit as much a harbinger of spring as the Flower Show - and in its own way just as colorful - is the annual sale of the Suburban Contractors Association that begins at 8:30 a.m. today in Essington. Only instead of the gentle hues of forsythia and hibiscus, today's sale features the basic reds, yellows and greens of heavy construction equipment. It's a real guy occasion. The sale, now in its 13th year, usually draws more than 1,200 bidders, according to Jerry Fleming, construction division representative of the Vilsmeier Auction Co., which traditionally conducts it the second Saturday in March.
NEWS
October 10, 2015 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mariya Plekan said she was in the Salvation Army thrift store, about to make her purchase and leave, when she heard a cracking sound. A steel beam landed in front of her, then an avalanche of debris entombed her. "I realized I was going to die here," Plekan told a Philadelphia jury Thursday. Her next thought: She was still alive, and she felt no pain. But she was pinned so tightly, she could move her arms only slightly. And then she waited, long into the night - almost 14 hours. For the first hour, she said, she screamed for help but could not be heard over the throbbing of construction equipment and the chaotic noise above her. A worried friend called her cellphone, again and again, but Plekan could not answer.
NEWS
July 11, 1987 | By John Jennings, Inquirer Staff Writer
Bail was set at $1 million yesterday for a suspected thief who FBI officials say shot an FBI agent Thursday in a South Plainfield, Middlesex County, motel room. Special agent Edward White, 43, of the bureau's Newark office, was listed in satisfactory condition yesterday at Muhlenberg Regional Medical Center in Plainfield after having been shot once in the rib cage as he struggled with theft suspect John Stonaker, 28, of Aurora, Colo., FBI spokesman Michael McDonnell said. Special agent-in-charge John McGinley said White had been interviewing Stonaker in a room at the Days Inn motel on Hamilton Boulevard as part of an investigation into interstate thefts of heavy construction equipment.
NEWS
March 29, 1987 | By Gail Krueger-Nicholson, Special to The Inquirer
The East Marlborough Zoning Hearing Board has given Robert C. Civita, a general contractor, 45 days to remove a storage trailer from his property at 731 Unionville Rd. The board also is considering whether Civita is violating the township's zoning ordinance by maintaining a commercial use on his residential property. At a hearing Tuesday night, Civita contended that he was using the trailer to store construction equipment temporarily until he completed construction of a garage on the site.
NEWS
August 12, 1987 | By CYNTHIA BURTON, Daily News Staff Writer
Ernest Edwards, the MOVE neighborhood rebuilder, allegedly sold city-owned construction equipment to a private contractor working on the project, according to court documents and testimony presented at Edwards' preliminary hearing yesterday. Leroy Gaillard, a project manager for G&V General Contractors Inc. of Norfolk, Va., testified yesterday that Edwards sold the equipment to his company for $4,800. According to a grand jury presentment, the equipment was worth nearly $5,900.
NEWS
June 28, 2000 | Jennifer Midberry / Daily News
While Philadelphia is welcoming visitors to the city for the Sunoco Welcome America! festivities - you know fireworks, Mummers, the whole schmear - Philadelphians are carefully negotiating the streetscape around town. The pavement and street in and around the Pennsylvania Convention Center are blocked with concrete slabs and it's just 33 days from the start of the Republican National Convention. Construction equipment, shovels and piles of stones and orange street cones line the area instead of potted plants.
NEWS
October 3, 1990 | By Dave Davies, Daily News Staff Writer
Call it another victim of the city's cash crisis. When the central courtyard of City Hall was closed to pedestrians on Sept. 4, the signs said it would reopen on Oct. 3. The idea was to get it fixed up and pretty for tonight's celebration of the re-lighting of the newly restored City Hall Tower. The caged walkways and construction equipment would be gone, re-opening once-cherished views of the tower and the steep and stony grandeur of City Hall's inner walls. But Oct. 3 has arrived, and the courtyard is still closed, its portals blocked by chain-link construction fences.
NEWS
June 27, 1992 | By David Iams, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
With the marina business thriving along the Delaware, there could be no better time to sell off a well-established company's marine construction equipment. If you've ever thought of getting into the marina business, be sure to be in Pleasantville on Tuesday. That's when the Vilsmeier Auction Co. will sell off more than 1,200 lots of marine and heavy construction equipment belonging to Hansen Inc. The sale begins at 8:45 a.m. at Hansen's, 22 N. Franklin Ave. The 40-year-old company, originally Ole Hansen & Sons, is closing its heavy construction and marine division to concentrate on underground utility construction, Vilsmeier president Rick Hutchinson said yesterday.
NEWS
December 17, 1987 | By Christopher Hepp, Inquirer Staff Writer
Contractor J. Leon Altemose said last night that the Building and Construction Trades Council of Philadelphia and Vicinity had agreed to pay him "in excess of $1 million" as part of an out-of-court settlement of a series of lawsuits. The settlement, to be taken before a federal judge today for approval, would also call for member unions of the trades council to allow Altemose to operate his open-shop construction company without harassment. Altemose said the money to be paid in the settlement would go primarily to cover legal fees.
NEWS
July 5, 1992 | By Ken Dilanian, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
In Hatfield Borough lately, council members don't seek office. It seeks them. Folks aren't exactly clamoring to hold office, officials found out during the last month while trying to fill two council vacancies. But they filled them nonetheless, most recently with the swearing-in Wednesday night of 10-year resident Wayne Donahue to replace James Brucia, who resigned May 20, citing time constraints. Like most residents, Donahue, who sells construction equipment for Trico Equipment Co. of Freehold, N.J., hasn't watched borough government very closely, he said.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 10, 2015 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mariya Plekan said she was in the Salvation Army thrift store, about to make her purchase and leave, when she heard a cracking sound. A steel beam landed in front of her, then an avalanche of debris entombed her. "I realized I was going to die here," Plekan told a Philadelphia jury Thursday. Her next thought: She was still alive, and she felt no pain. But she was pinned so tightly, she could move her arms only slightly. And then she waited, long into the night - almost 14 hours. For the first hour, she said, she screamed for help but could not be heard over the throbbing of construction equipment and the chaotic noise above her. A worried friend called her cellphone, again and again, but Plekan could not answer.
BUSINESS
November 6, 2012 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Columnist
On a Tuesday morning two weeks ago, Philadelphia gallery operator Jinous Kazemi was running after a Nissan Pathfinder on Third Street in Old City, shouting and waving as she tried to get the driver's attention. At first I thought it was a desperate form of customer solicitation. Then I noticed the traffic cone wedged under the Pathfinder's carriage. The driver had unknowingly run over it as he tried to maneuver around a block-long construction site between Market and Chestnut Streets that business owners there say has chased away motorists and pedestrians for more than a year.
NEWS
September 28, 2012 | By Robert Moran, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In a possible case of competitive sabotage, skilled vandals destroyed from $2 million to $3 million worth of construction equipment at a Northeast Philadelphia work site, officials said Thursday. "It was like a scene from a movie, like Armageddon ," said Capt. Jack McGinnis, commanding officer of Northeast Detectives. Workers for Walsh Construction Co. II L.L.C. left the site, near Magee Avenue and New State Road in Tacony, about 8:30 p.m. Wednesday. When the workers returned at 7 a.m. Thursday, "they found the entire place completely demolished," McGinnis said.
NEWS
October 16, 2011 | By Matt Katz and Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writers
When the chunks of concrete began falling, Camden's Lanning Square School closed and students were temporarily moved into two 19th-century buildings. Nine years and $10 million later, the Lanning Square School has been demolished, architectural plans have been drawn for a new building, and adjacent homes have been seized by eminent domain - but the neighborhood is nowhere near getting a new school. Now children's advocates are calling for an investigation into how part of the land set aside for a $42.4 million school has become a parking lot for a politically connected construction project.
NEWS
July 31, 2001 | By Suzette Parmley INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
For more than three years, getting to and from the Capital Complex from outside the city has meant running a gauntlet of jackhammers, bulldozers, cranes, and other heavy equipment along Route 29 in front of the Waterfront Park stadium. For residents of Lamberton Street, where the construction is concentrated, the agony has been compounded by the noise, dust, stench, danger and inconvenience of extra traffic rumbling past their homes. The Route 29 Improvement Project, state transportation officials said last week, will be completed by May. It won't be a day too soon, especially for those who live and work in the vicinity.
NEWS
June 28, 2000 | Jennifer Midberry / Daily News
While Philadelphia is welcoming visitors to the city for the Sunoco Welcome America! festivities - you know fireworks, Mummers, the whole schmear - Philadelphians are carefully negotiating the streetscape around town. The pavement and street in and around the Pennsylvania Convention Center are blocked with concrete slabs and it's just 33 days from the start of the Republican National Convention. Construction equipment, shovels and piles of stones and orange street cones line the area instead of potted plants.
NEWS
July 13, 1999 | by Scott Heimer, Daily News Staff Writer
There's something wrong with the picture of a $60,000 backhoe rolling down a Kensington street at night at close to its maximum speed of about 25 mph. For one thing, it's not titled or licensed for street use. For another, nearly all construction work employing backhoes is daytime. "Late at night - well, you know they're not doing any construction work then," said Police Lt. John Hagerty of the Auto Squad. What's wrong with the picture is that another backhoe, the most stolen piece of construction equipment on the map, is being pilfered.
NEWS
January 12, 1999 | By Michael Rothfeld, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
A rash of vandalism of heavy construction machinery around the region has prompted a trade association to offer a $100,000 reward. According to Associated Builders & Contractors Inc., which represents commercial contractors, vandals have repeatedly poured a metallic, sandlike substance into the engine oil or hydraulic tanks of heavy equipment at various construction sites. In most instances, the machines' engines had to be replaced. Between June and October, three contractors have had property damage totaling $50,000 in six incidents, association officials said.
NEWS
June 9, 1998 | By Clea Benson, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The loud crack of gunfire was familiar on the street where Everett Marshall worked, but the Brewerytown auto mechanic decided to look outside anyway when he heard shots yesterday afternoon. Marshall, 32, left off tinkering with his own Buick Regal and stuck his head out the door of the garage where he worked. That, police said, was Marshall's last act. Gunmen firing down the 2800 block of Thompson Street apparently missed their intended target and instead hit Marshall once in the head, police said.
NEWS
May 10, 1998 | By Karen E. Quinones Miller, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As far back as Lisa Stowe can remember, the Market-Frankford Elevated has been a dominant presence in her life. Growing up near 63d and Market Streets, she could see the looming structure from her window and hear the trains rattle by. As a girl, she rode the El with her mother to visit family in Center City. As a teenager, she rode it by herself to hang out with friends at The Gallery. Now 26, she uses it to commute to her telemarketing job in Upper Darby. "I have to use the El to get around, but I've always thought SEPTA should make some improvements," said Stowe.
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