CollectionsConstruction Materials
IN THE NEWS

Construction Materials

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
August 27, 2000 | By Nedra Lindsey, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Small amounts of asbestos have been found by construction officials at Edgewood Senior High School within the last two weeks. The asbestos was uncovered during work at the school as the Winslow School District prepares to take it over. The asbestos was found under an outdoor canopy adjacent to the cafeteria and along the edge of a building where construction will occur, said Larry Hobdell, superintendent for the Winslow School District. "All of the asbestos we've discovered is, thankfully, on the outside," Hobdell said.
NEWS
February 28, 1990 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Special to The Inquirer
Robert T. Winzinger Inc., the Hainesport contracting firm, agreed yesterday to close a controversial dump in a residential section of Hainesport, township prosecutor Mark Molz said yesterday. Winzinger's attorney, Walter Wolf, negotiated an agreement in Hainesport Municipal Court to remove broken concrete, scrap metal and used construction materials during the next eight months. The accord, covering the 60-acre site off the Mount Holly Bypass, ended minutes before Winzinger, president of the $30-million-a-year road construction, demolition and recycling company, was due to appear before Hainesport Judge Harry Dyer 3d on charges of illegal dumping and operating machinery without a permit.
NEWS
April 17, 2013 | By John P. Martin, Inquirer Staff Writer
The owners of the SugarHouse Casino have agreed to pay $650,000 to settle claims that their workers illegally dumped construction materials into the Delaware River near the Philadelphia casino, prosecutors said Monday. Under the settlement, announced by U.S. Attorney Zane David Memeger, SugarHouse HSP Gaming will pay a $25,000 civil penalty and donate $625,000 to the Brandywine Conservancy, a nonprofit agency dedicated to protecting natural resources. "This case reinforces our commitment to protecting the environment by ensuring that corporations either follow environmental laws or face serious sanctions," Memeger said in a statement.
BUSINESS
September 2, 2005 | By Kevin G. Hall INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Hurricane Katrina devastated the Gulf Coast with such force that reconstruction is likely to have no parallel in American history. To make matters worse, already tight markets and high prices for construction materials will make reconstruction costlier, experts said. The natural disaster comes as the nation is experiencing a housing boom. Strong economic growth in the United States, Canada and China is making many construction materials, including concrete and steel, scarce and prices high.
NEWS
August 20, 1989 | By John Ellis, Special to The Inquirer
By 8:15 p.m., Alan R. Gordon knew it was going to be a long night. First of all, the stenographer was late. And there were about 25 residents in the audience prepared to protest a plan for a drug and alcohol treatment center at 4070 Butler Pike. Not to mention the other three cases on the agenda for the Whitemarsh Zoning Hearing Board on Wednesday night. Two and a half hours later, as the fire horn on the township building wailed away, Gordon, chairman of the Zoning Hearing Board, just sat and shook his head.
NEWS
September 15, 1991 | By Rob Wingate, Special to The Inquirer
Building a new Little League field at Larchmont Park has been a hot issue all summer in Marple Township, with steady opposition from homeowners in the nearby Stanfield development in Broomall. But two judges made short work of it last week after the neighbors took the issue to court. And Marple officials said a state grant would help pay the cost of construction materials - one week after they said they could not accept the grant because of local opposition. "We ended up getting exactly what we wanted," Commissioner Robert Jordan said Wednesday.
NEWS
September 28, 2010 | By BARBARA LAKER & WENDY RUDERMAN, lakerb@phillynews.com 215-854-5933
The Rev. Harry Davis wondered why truckloads of high-end construction materials were delivered to the alley behind a rundown three-story building in West Oak Lane, rather than to the front door. Davis, whose Holy Temple Baptist Church was three doors away, also found it odd that workers toiled night and day for nearly two weeks to renovate the building in summer 2008. Davis' son, Herman, said that some of the workers were PHA employees who seemed nervous about the job. "I heard one of them say, 'I don't get paid enough at PHA,' " Herman Davis said.
NEWS
April 17, 1990 | By Lisa Ellis and Susan Warner, Inquirer Staff Writers
Three cars were damaged and one pedestrian was injured yesterday morning when a large glass panel was knocked off the 33d floor of the Two Liberty Place construction site and fell to the street below. The glass, part of the outer "curtain wall" being installed on the 33d floor, fell after it was struck by a rising construction elevator, said Kathy Naimoli, administrative assistant to Don S. Kligerman, commissioner of the city Department of Licenses and Inspections. The elevator operator had been instructed before the incident not to take the vehicle above the 31st floor, but he took it higher and hit the glass, Naimoli said.
BUSINESS
March 30, 1990 | By Susan Warner, Inquirer Staff Writer
It may not be neighborly, but when the wind picks up, Bob Dettore heads to the roof with a pair of binoculars to peep at what's going on across the street. In a high-rise neighborhood feud, Dettore, manager of engineering and construction at the Centre Square office complex at 15th and Market, has launched a surveillance mission on Two Liberty Place, the office tower under construction across 16th Street. From his vantage point 43 stories above the street - or from well- positioned corner offices - Dettore scans the construction site, looking for piles of drywall, metal duct work or other materials that could take flight in a high wind.
NEWS
February 15, 2012 | BY JULIANA REYES
ONE EVENING in Society Hill, on his daily jog, Brian Hamilton came across a ridiculous number of concrete slabs. The mother lode, if you will. Hundreds of the slabs, along with bundles of bricks and haphazardly placed wooden beams, lined Front Street near Walnut, taking up the equivalent of about half a city block. There's something you don't see every day. Except, Hamilton did start seeing the construction materials every day. It's been a year, he said, and they haven't budged.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 17, 2013 | By John P. Martin, Inquirer Staff Writer
The owners of the SugarHouse Casino have agreed to pay $650,000 to settle claims that their workers illegally dumped construction materials into the Delaware River near the Philadelphia casino, prosecutors said Monday. Under the settlement, announced by U.S. Attorney Zane David Memeger, SugarHouse HSP Gaming will pay a $25,000 civil penalty and donate $625,000 to the Brandywine Conservancy, a nonprofit agency dedicated to protecting natural resources. "This case reinforces our commitment to protecting the environment by ensuring that corporations either follow environmental laws or face serious sanctions," Memeger said in a statement.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 2012 | By Victoria Donohoe, For The Inquirer
Three solo and three group shows hold sway currently at the Delaware Center for Contemporary Arts, in a roundup featuring many Philadelphia artists. A degree of spontaneity stamps the double shows "Under Construction, Parts I and II," which display work by 10 regional artists currently involved in combining various aspects of construction, architecture, design and sculpture. Some use ordinary building materials, others construction-site discards. Especially compelling are robust sculptural works Acanthus Model and The Movement of Objects by Wilmington's Joe Netta, both subtle essays in texture, structure, and composition - energetic, evocative pieces that establish definite mood and atmosphere.
NEWS
February 15, 2012 | BY JULIANA REYES
ONE EVENING in Society Hill, on his daily jog, Brian Hamilton came across a ridiculous number of concrete slabs. The mother lode, if you will. Hundreds of the slabs, along with bundles of bricks and haphazardly placed wooden beams, lined Front Street near Walnut, taking up the equivalent of about half a city block. There's something you don't see every day. Except, Hamilton did start seeing the construction materials every day. It's been a year, he said, and they haven't budged.
NEWS
April 22, 2011
By Thomas Hylton In recent years, there has been a growing recognition of the value of trees in urban areas. Trees not only beautify our cities and towns; they also cleanse the air, absorb carbon dioxide, and lower ambient temperatures. Here in the Delaware Valley, the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society recently launched an initiative to coordinate the planting of one million trees by 2020. It's easy to get people excited about planting new trees. It's far more difficult to ensure those trees will survive to maturity.
NEWS
September 28, 2010 | By BARBARA LAKER & WENDY RUDERMAN, lakerb@phillynews.com 215-854-5933
The Rev. Harry Davis wondered why truckloads of high-end construction materials were delivered to the alley behind a rundown three-story building in West Oak Lane, rather than to the front door. Davis, whose Holy Temple Baptist Church was three doors away, also found it odd that workers toiled night and day for nearly two weeks to renovate the building in summer 2008. Davis' son, Herman, said that some of the workers were PHA employees who seemed nervous about the job. "I heard one of them say, 'I don't get paid enough at PHA,' " Herman Davis said.
LIVING
January 23, 2009 | By Alan J. Heavens INQUIRER REAL ESTATE WRITER
Question: My wife and I are thinking of building a home. One of the things we are having trouble figuring out is what is going on with the costs of building materials. I look online, and the only thing I can find is average lumber prices. I can't find anything for vinyl, roofing materials, tile, granite or drywall. It seems there is no tracking of them that gets published. In these times, when most things are coming down in price, I am curious to see whether the cost of building a home is coming down, as well.
BUSINESS
September 2, 2005 | By Kevin G. Hall INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Hurricane Katrina devastated the Gulf Coast with such force that reconstruction is likely to have no parallel in American history. To make matters worse, already tight markets and high prices for construction materials will make reconstruction costlier, experts said. The natural disaster comes as the nation is experiencing a housing boom. Strong economic growth in the United States, Canada and China is making many construction materials, including concrete and steel, scarce and prices high.
REAL_ESTATE
January 14, 2001 | By Alan J. Heavens, INQUIRER REAL ESTATE WRITER
The housing industry is perpetually in search of ways to build houses that can withstand natural disasters, especially high winds and earthquakes. That search for answers is now taking place in Australia, courtesy of an American homebuilders group. Specifically, the focus is to improve engineering design methods for wood-frame houses. Most houses in the United States are of wood-frame construction, even though efforts have been made by the industry to persuade builders and consumers to use stronger materials, such as steel and concrete.
NEWS
August 27, 2000 | By Nedra Lindsey, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Small amounts of asbestos have been found by construction officials at Edgewood Senior High School within the last two weeks. The asbestos was uncovered during work at the school as the Winslow School District prepares to take it over. The asbestos was found under an outdoor canopy adjacent to the cafeteria and along the edge of a building where construction will occur, said Larry Hobdell, superintendent for the Winslow School District. "All of the asbestos we've discovered is, thankfully, on the outside," Hobdell said.
NEWS
September 15, 1991 | By Rob Wingate, Special to The Inquirer
Building a new Little League field at Larchmont Park has been a hot issue all summer in Marple Township, with steady opposition from homeowners in the nearby Stanfield development in Broomall. But two judges made short work of it last week after the neighbors took the issue to court. And Marple officials said a state grant would help pay the cost of construction materials - one week after they said they could not accept the grant because of local opposition. "We ended up getting exactly what we wanted," Commissioner Robert Jordan said Wednesday.
1 | 2 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|