CollectionsConstruction
IN THE NEWS

Construction

NEWS
January 16, 2016
A construction worker died Thursday night after falling into the Delaware River in South Philadelphia, police said. Police were called about 8:40 p.m. to Pier 78, where the man had been working and then disappeared, said Chief Inspector Scott Small. The man's hard hat was seen floating in the river, and his car was still parked nearby. The police Marine Unit retrieved the man around 9:30 p.m. and he was transported to Hahnemann University Hospital, where he was pronounced dead at 10:33 p.m. How the man, whose age was not available, fell into the river was under investigation.
REAL_ESTATE
November 22, 2015 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
In the early 2000s, some in the residential-construction industry predicted that, in the not-too-distant future, the United States would reach its new-home saturation point. The result would be a corresponding growth in the remodeling industry because the houses that had been built in the 1980s and 1990s would require major updating. Although some builders added remodeling components to their businesses, the bursting of the housing bubble and the eight-year real estate downturn that followed brought residential construction to a crawl.
NEWS
October 14, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
WHEN YOU'VE lived in the same neighborhood for more than 50 years, you're bound to have had a strong impact. John G. Skelton was something of a legend in the neighborhood around 29th Street and Lehigh Avenue, North Philadelphia, a familiar presence on the streets where he was always ready with a friendly greeting and big hello. John saw a couple of generations grow up there. He saw people come and go, while he stayed put. He saw inevitable changes, but basically the community remained the same close-knit home to dedicated, hardworking people.
NEWS
August 7, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Thomas F. Greany, 93, formerly of Wynnewood, a construction company executive here and in the Middle East, died Friday, July 31, at the home of a daughter in St. Louis. Mr. Greany graduated from St. Joseph's Preparatory School and earned a bachelor's degree from the Georgetown University School of Foreign Service. He accepted a commission in the Navy at age 19 and went on to serve during World War II and the Korean War. Mr. Greany was trained to pilot airships, or dirigibles, which were being used to watch for enemy submarines.
BUSINESS
August 4, 2015 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
One in an occasional series Brian Martin, 33, almost gave up on being a bricklayer during the recession. He loved the work but couldn't get any, so he joined the vast army of construction workers rendered jobless by the worst economic downturn since the Great Depression. "I thought about going back to school," said Martin, of Glenolden, taking a break from work at the University of Pennsylvania's newest dormitory, the New College House at Hill Field. Up on the scaffolding, Rocco D'Angelico, 59, said he managed to keep working as a bricklayer during the recession, but now he's looking toward retirement because of "all the aches and pains in my bones.
SPORTS
July 31, 2015 | BY LES BOWEN, Daily News Staff Writer bowenl@phillynews.com
IT WOULD BE so great to know what Chip Kelly was really thinking on Jan. 17, 2013, the day he was introduced as the 21st coach of the Philadelphia Eagles. Did Kelly know then that to fully implement his vision, he would need a different type of running back than LeSean McCoy, a different type of quarterback than Nick Foles or Michael Vick, a different type of receiver than DeSean Jackson, and a totally revised secondary? Did he envision that the nexus of contract, age and salary cap issues would mean he would shed Trent Cole, Jeremy Maclin, Todd Herremans and Evan Mathis, among others, by the time he opened his third training camp, for which workouts begin on Sunday?
NEWS
July 24, 2015 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
For the guys at Longo's Auto Sales in Collingswood, the Route 130 project can't end soon enough. "We went from selling 25 cars a month to 12," says owner Jim Longo. Adds salesman Bob Hartley, who works on commission: "You can't print my opinion of the project. " To say Longo's "overlooks" the $31 million makeover of 130 between the PATCO viaduct and North Park Drive doesn't begin to convey the used-car lot's proximity to three years of disruptive construction. Not to mention, traffic jams: About 65,000 vehicles per day thunder through this stretch of 130, often backing up south to the White Horse Pike and north to the (former)
REAL_ESTATE
June 29, 2015 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
There was a time, not very long ago, when the number of unsubsidized, market-rate residential construction projects within the Philadelphia city limits could be counted on one hand. Now, you need a scorecard to keep track, and even that list might need to be updated daily. Noah Ostroff, of Keller Williams Real Estate in Center City, said that, typically, when he gets a call from someone looking to buy a property in the city, it is for new construction. "I don't have many people looking for traditional - what we call 'homes with character,' " he said.
NEWS
May 4, 2015 | By Michaelle Bond, Inquirer Staff Writer
A driver was killed and four construction workers were injured, one seriously, Saturday morning in a crash in a construction zone on the Pennsylvania Turnpike in lower Bucks County. The accident happened just before 5:30 a.m. in the eastbound lanes near the Bensalem Interchange. It closed the eastbound lanes until 11 a.m. The driver of the car, who had not been identified, crashed into a truck carrying construction workers who were picking up traffic cones to reopen a lane closed for overnight work, state police said.
BUSINESS
April 18, 2015 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Bryn Mawr Hospital announced plans Thursday for a $200 million modernization of its campus, including a five-story, 203,000-square-foot patient pavilion with 12 operating rooms and 72 private patient rooms. Bryn Mawr will have 250 inpatient rooms after the project is completed. That is about the same number it uses now. "It's a historic modernization project that takes us to the next chapter for this hospital and this community, but it is clearly on the inpatient side, not a growth strategy," said Andrea Gilbert, president of the hospital.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|