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NEWS
January 21, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
KEMEL DAWKINS had a problem. As one of the lead contractors on the construction of the Pennsylvania Convention Center in the 1990s, he needed to find a black superintendent to oversee the toughest part of the project - renovation of the Reading Terminal train shed. Dawkins, himself African-American, needed a black man to boss the difficult operation in order to adhere to the Convention Center's strict affirmative-action program. Inspectors roamed the enormous project daily to make sure the proper ratio of women and African-American workers was on the job. Kemel Dawkins, who died Jan. 11 at the age of 91, solved the problem after a nationwide search when he and his partners selected Angelo R. Perryman, an Evergreen, Ala., native then working construction in Detroit.
NEWS
January 7, 2015 | By Jessica Parks, Inquirer Staff Writer
Every eight months or so, Rose Valley Creek breaches its banks, sending two to three inches of water around the old trees, across the fields, and up to the Quinn family's front door in Ambler. Flooding is a perennial problem in Ambler, a small Montgomery County borough criss-crossed by creeks and downstream from miles of suburban runoff. If the Wissahickon Valley were a bathtub, Ambler would be the drain. So when a developer in the fall introduced plans to build houses on the only untouched creek-side lots, neighbors were up in arms.
NEWS
November 8, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Rodman A. Boston, 89, of Drexel Hill, a carpenter and construction supervisor for many years, died Friday, Oct. 31, of respiratory failure at Lankenau Hospital. Born in West Philadelphia, Mr. Boston, known as "Roddy," was one of six children. He was taken out of West Catholic High School at age 16 to work in the family's butcher shop. Later, he received a diploma from West Catholic. He enlisted in World War II and fought in the Battle of the Bulge as part of Gen. George S. Patton's Third Army.
NEWS
November 4, 2014 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Camden County man died Monday morning after being struck by a one-pound tape measure that fell 50 stories from a high-rise under construction in Jersey City, N.J., authorities said. Gary Anderson, 58, of Somerdale, was delivering drywall to the downtown construction site about 8:40 a.m. when the tape measure fell off the belt of a worker on the top of the building, said Carly Baldwin, Jersey City public safety spokeswoman. The tape measure "hit another piece of metal construction equipment 15 feet off the ground, then ricocheted and hit this man in the head," Baldwin said.
NEWS
October 28, 2014 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
Michael Parrington, 70, of Burlington City, a former commercial archaeologist who unearthed rare artifacts on construction sites from Britain to the Jersey Shore and from Philadelphia and Manhattan, died Saturday, Oct. 18, at home of progressive supranuclear palsy. Born in Lancashire, England, Mr. Parrington moved to the Philadelphia area in 1976 and took a job at an excavation site at Valley Forge where he met and worked alongside fellow archaeologist Helen (Linny) Schenck, who became his second wife.
NEWS
October 3, 2014 | By Rita Giordano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Residents gave their approval to capital projects in seven of the eight South Jersey school districts that put them up to a vote Tuesday. Statewide, 17 of 21 districts' school construction proposals were approved - totaling more than $300 million. It was not full approval in every case. Some districts with multiple ballot questions, including Cinnaminson, Haddon Township, Delsea Regional, and West Deptford, had their core proposals accepted, but secondary proposals rejected. Moorestown voters approved both proposals put before them.
REAL_ESTATE
September 15, 2014 | By Erin Arvedlund, Inquirer Staff Writer
What's in a name? For developer Chad Ludeman, quite a lot. His projects include Awesometown in Fishtown, Duplexcellence in South Kensington, and Folsom Powerhouse in Francisville. And now, Pop! - two cork-clad and -insulated houses that feature purifying air-filtration systems and green roofs. Postgreen Homes, founded by Ludeman and run by him, wife Courtney, and partner Nic Darling, is anything but an ordinary development company. And quite a few buyers, it turns out, are sold on those distinctive names.
BUSINESS
August 29, 2014 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Standing amid scaffolding and building materials at the AQ Rittenhouse apartment and retail project in Center City on Wednesday, Stephen Pouppirt, president of Clemens Construction Co. Inc., almost couldn't keep count of all the major projects his company is handling this summer. "A lot of projects," he said, "Maybe 20, four major ones, and we have many in the queue. " Pouppirt's contracts, including several in Center City, are part of what is ranking the Philadelphia metropolitan division third nationally in the number of construction jobs added in a year, according to a trade group's analysis of Labor Department numbers.
NEWS
August 28, 2014 | By Laura McCrystal, Inquirer Staff Writer
After years of planning, Swarthmore College is beginning construction of an inn, bookstore, and roundabout. The project will result in traffic changes along Route 320, and the inn will bring the first liquor license to an otherwise-dry Delaware County borough. Borough and college officials say the development, which has been planned for more than 15 years, will improve a dangerous intersection and connect the college to its community. The project's opponents, however, have not given up. Even as construction crews begin work on the roundabout this week, residents opposed to it are planning to file an appeal in court.
NEWS
August 25, 2014 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
For decades, Gloucester Township has yearned to earn a place on the regional retailing map. But the construction of an upscale discount shopping complex in the Blackwood section is provoking mixed emotions. Gloucester Premium Outlets "will be the largest economic development project in the history of our community," says Mayor David Mayer, who describes the center as "a $40 million [property tax] ratable, when all is said and done. " The mayor's choice of words is important. While he expects the township ultimately will collect $1.4 million annually, the outlets between Route 42 and the Black Horse Pike will not pay property taxes in full for five years.
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