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Construction

NEWS
December 30, 2012 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
The site where Chestnut Hill Friends Meeting is building a new meetinghouse was damaged by arsonists during Christmas week, and police are now "absolutely" sure the attack was the result of a dispute between members of a Philadelphia construction union and the project's nonunion contractor. Although no suspects have been identified in the Dec. 21 incident, Lt. George McClay of Northwest Detectives said Friday that he was certain the small Quaker building on East Mermaid Lane was targeted because it is being built with nonunion labor.
NEWS
December 28, 2012 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
JERUSALEM - Israel is planning its biggest construction surge in east Jerusalem in decades in a move that critics argue would cement its grip on the contested territory, further complicate any prospects for peace with the Palestinians, and badly rattle Israel's already rocky relations with the rest of the world. With more than 9,000 apartments in various stages of planning and construction, Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu is reaffirming his opposition to ceding any parts of the holy city to the Palestinians, a compromise that two of his predecessors had accepted.
NEWS
December 19, 2012 | By Matthew Lee, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - In unusually rare and blunt criticism of its top Mideast ally, the Obama administration on Tuesday criticized Israel for continuing to announce new settlement construction on land claimed by the Palestinians. The State Department accused Israel of engaging in a "pattern of provocative action" that calls into question statements from Israeli leaders that they are committed to peace. Spokeswoman Victoria Nuland said settlement activity only puts the goal of peace "further at risk" and urged both Israel and the Palestinians to halt all provocations and take steps to revive long-stalled peace talks.
NEWS
December 3, 2012 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Alfred F. Schwartz, 73, of North Coventry, whose passions were family, Corvettes, and construction, died Tuesday, Nov. 27, of respiratory failure at Pottstown Memorial Medical Center. Born at home in Danboro, Bucks County, he was a graduate of Central Bucks High School in Doylestown. He and his wife, the former Sally McKeown, lived in Montgomery and Chester Counties. Mr. Schwartz worked in construction for 45 years. He was employed as a construction manager with L.F. Driscoll Co. for 14 years, retiring in 2001.
BUSINESS
November 29, 2012 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pennsylvania state insurance commissioner Michael Consedine last week sued top executives of a failed Villanova construction surety company, accusing them of "raiding" the firm's assets and diverting millions in company cash. The firm, First Sealord Surety Inc ., was taken over by Consedine's department in February. The failure caused the cancellation of financial arrangements for hundreds of construction firms who had used First Sealord surety policies to guarantee they would finish clients' projects on schedule.
NEWS
November 26, 2012 | By James Osborne, Inquirer Staff Writer
Underneath its summer rental homes and saltwater taffy stands, the Jersey Shore is, geologically speaking, a chain of barrier islands - strips of sand built up over centuries that protect the mainland from the full impact of Atlantic storms. As the islands were developed into resorts, particularly in the last 50 years, houses and roads were built atop the former dunes. Man-made seawalls were constructed to protect development. In the weeks since Sandy wreaked nearly $30 billion in damage in New Jersey, most of it on the coastline, debate has grown over whether rising sea levels and a projected worsening of storms in decades to come mean it is time to begin pulling development back from the ocean's edge.
NEWS
November 21, 2012 | By Jennifer Lin, Inquirer Staff Writer
After a false start four years ago, the Goldenberg Group has started construction on a $100 million student apartment building next to Temple University on the site of the former John Wanamaker Middle School. The 14-story residence, in the 1100 block of Cecil B. Moore Avenue, will add 832 beds for Temple students. In 2008, the Goldenberg Group, of Blue Bell, outbid others to buy the former school from the Philadelphia School District for $10.75 million. The original plan was to renovate the school into student apartments, with community space and a charter school for the Bright Hope Baptist Church, which is across the street.
NEWS
November 11, 2012 | By Joseph A. Gambardello, Inquirer Staff Writer
Camden's 81-year-old City Hall is to be named after the late Melvin R. "Randy" Primas Jr., who was the impoverished city's first African American mayor, Camden County announced Friday. Primas, who also served as the city's chief operating officer during the state takeover of Camden, died March 1 at 62 in South Carolina. The county said in a statement that a dedication ceremony would be held at noon Tuesday. The neoclassical City Hall, which has a light-gray granite facade with a 370-foot clock tower rising from a massive base, opened in 1931.
NEWS
November 9, 2012 | BY VALERIE RUSS, Daily News Staff Writer
ALTHOUGH HE has fought for gay rights for more than 40 years, Mark Segal said gay seniors still face discrimination when looking for housing. "I met a woman who came to me crying because she was being barred from visiting her partner of 30 years," said Segal, publisher of the Philadelphia Gay News . "Imagine to have to fight to see someone. And this was in a private apartment. " Segal told of a gay man who lives in a senior-housing development where every time he went into one of the common areas, "people would come and pray around them, trying to pray them out of their gayness.
NEWS
October 21, 2012
With a report that has exposed developers cutting corners as they renovate buildings around Temple University's North Philadelphia campus, City Controller Alan Butkovitz has lifted a rock on shoddy construction practices that jack up city costs while shortchanging taxpayers and forcing neighborhoods to unnecessarily contend with additional rubble, dirt, and dust. In one sense, any concern arising from development is a good problem to have. It's certainly preferable to a lack of construction activity along blocks and blocks of low-income neighborhoods.
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