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NEWS
February 27, 2012 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
If it was Alan Gilbert's aim to become music director of the New York Philharmonic and have minimal effect on the character of the ensemble, he is, in his third season, succeeding. The Philharmonic is a fine orchestra. But Friday night at the Kimmel Center, the New Yorkers were the same old collection of free-wheeling individualists they have been for years. In the Mussorgsky/Ravel Pictures at an Exhibition , there was little sense that anyone would - or could? - make them blend.
NEWS
February 20, 2012 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
In Astral Artists' one-day Spiritual Voyages Festival on Saturday, flutist Julietta Curenton rightly occupied the "eye of the storm" slot - the middle - having been the conceptual epicenter of the three-concert event at Church of the Holy Trinity with a program that solidly bridged mainstream classical repertoire and the non-European cultures represented in the other two concerts. She and pianist Andrea Lam followed an African American program featuring composers George Walker and Alvin Singleton and preceded music of Asian and Latin American origin with composers such as Gabriela Lena Frank and musicians such as Swarthmore's Gamelan Semara Santi.
NEWS
February 15, 2012 | By Peter Dobrin, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Chicago-based ensemble eighth blackbird will alight at the Curtis Institute of Music for a residency to last at least three years. Initially funded with a $450,000 grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, the sextet's members - who picked up a new Grammy this past weekend - will bring expertise in 20th- and 21st-century instrumental techniques to Curtis students in coachings, side-by-side performances, and world premieres. The residency, which starts in October and lasts a total of four weeks each school year, grew out of shorter previous visits, including one in which Curtis students performed with the group in Steve Reich's Double Sextet , which eighth blackbird had commissioned and premiered.
NEWS
February 10, 2012 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Somebody needed to program the orphans in Beethoven's output, and pianist Anton Kuerti was the one to do it at his Philadelphia Chamber Music Society recital Wednesday at the Kimmel Center. Never a glamour pianist, the 73-year-old Vienna-born, Canada-based Kuerti - his hair longer and wilder than ever - has been performing cycles of Beethoven sonatas for as far back as I can remember (40 years) and is a model of nonapologist performers. As majestic as Beethoven can be, his piano sonatas contain some of his most private music - cranky, quirky, and not always clear in what it has to say, especially pieces published not in a litter, but by themselves, without catchy subtitles or nicknames.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 7, 2012 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Even if Symphony in C's Saturday performance of the Mozart Requiem wasn't everything one could dream of, it was a model in partnerships that makes fantasy possible. Mendelssohn Club of Philadelphia and a quartet of vocal soloists from the Academy of Vocal Arts joined the orchestra under its music director, Rossen Milanov, assuring professionalism that won't bust the budget. So what wasn't there to love? The concert was titled "Unfinished Masterpieces," encompassing not just the Requiem (left incomplete at the composer's death)
ENTERTAINMENT
February 7, 2012 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
For years, Tempesta di Mare has liberated its programs from the masterpiece mentality that often comes with higher-budget organizations. At Sunday's concert at Presbyterian Church of Chestnut Hill, hardly a brand-name composer (excepting Antonio Vivaldi) or a previously known piece was heard. Tempesta di Mare is an old-music group that acts like a new-music group, by pushing the cutting edge back rather than forward. And, as in new-music concerts, expectations must shift: You won't always appreciate everything.
NEWS
February 6, 2012 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Mood-stabilizing medication is a great thing for everyday life. But in art? Pierrot Lunaire - Arnold Schoenberg's revolutionary piece exploring new vistas of madness in music - seems to have had an all-too-tempering prescription when played by the enterprising Dolce Suono Ensemble in its "Mahler 100/Schoenberg 60" concert Friday at Haverford College. About 90 years after its premiere, Schoenberg's dramatization of 21 Albert Giraud poems - portraying the normally benign commedia dell'arte character of Pierrot having gone crazy from staring at the moon - should still feel wildly mercurial and formidably atonal, with traditional vocal writing replaced by a speech-song that showcases words with an otherworldly eeriness.
NEWS
January 30, 2012 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
At age 82, composer George Crumb can consider himself complimented when listeners walk out during a new piece. Though departures were few during Orchestra 2001's world premiere of Songs From the Heartland at the Trinity Center for Urban Life on Saturday, they still reminded you of how much Crumb's individuality can still seem extraterrestrial to those who don't expect to hear familiar and exotic instruments playing in unorthodox ways. Like its six predecessors, Heartland transforms folk songs, hymns, and chants not with typical re-harmonization, but by transplanting the tunes - sung, spoken, and whispered by Ann Crumb and Patrick Mason - into an alien sound environment.
NEWS
January 23, 2012 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
The John Cage Centennial has come roaring into 2012, as if the avant-garde theorist/composer's advocates couldn't wait to bedevil traditional music circles with his expansive, unmediated embrace of all sound and all possibilities. In Philadelphia, the year was inaugurated Friday by a smart, enterprising, inviting Cage concert at thefidget space (a homey warehouse in Kensington), the first in a series of three. The one work on the program was the 30-minute Four 6 , a late Cage work in which the composer provided perimeters and the musicians supply content.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 2012 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
WILMINGTON - The division between ancient and current music sometimes barely exists: Those involved with speculative resurrection of centuries-old sound need not work that much differently to bring new music into being. So nobody should be surprised that the small, Wilmington-based chamber-music group Mélomanie had no audible problems mixing ultra-polite Telemann with Variations on a Theme by Steely Dan by Mark Hagerty, performed Saturday at Grace United Methodist Church here (repeated Sunday at the Presbyterian Church of Chestnut Hill)
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