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SPORTS
February 24, 1996 | By Bob Ford, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Brian White was on his way to try out for the high school baseball team when he heard his buddies from the football squad calling his name. They were running around with sticks in their hands, bashing into each other and generally having a great time. So White never made it to the baseball field. He took a detour into lacrosse, and has never regretted the decision. "Picking up the ball and running with it, hitting people, it's a lot better than standing around at shortstop," he said.
NEWS
June 26, 1996
There's one possible explanation for the recent, misguided push in Harrisburg to scrap the state's mandatory helmet law and let motorcyclists ride with their hair blowing in the breeze: As once said in jest of a former U.S. president, maybe somebody's been playing too much football without a helmet. Without head protection, contact sports as well as any type of cycling can be harmful to clear thinking. So let's hope Gov. Ridge keeps his head clear (and well-protected) - and vetoes any such screwball legislation sent to him by state lawmakers.
NEWS
August 30, 2014 | By Kathy Boccella, Inquirer Staff Writer
At the Shipley School in Bryn Mawr, athletic officials say they care more about blocking head injuries than blocking free kicks. The private Main Line school on Thursday banned middle school soccer players from heading the ball - the first school in the nation to do so - and also said most high school athletes will wear sensors to measure both the frequency and intensity of blows to the head. "We've seen a growing trend of injuries in our students, severe head injuries," said athletic director Mark Duncan.
SPORTS
February 12, 2012 | By Jonathan Tamari, Inquirer Staff Writer
The debate and discussion over concussions and their consequences have moved beyond the spotlight of professional sports. According to neurologists, that's a good thing. In college, high school, and youth leagues, awareness is growing. "This is one of those slow awakenings of, 'There's a real problem, there's a real danger,' " said Doug Smith, director of the Center for Brain Injury and Repair at the University of Pennsylvania. Awareness of concussions and their lasting impact has grown among the general public in the last five years, he said.
NEWS
November 10, 2010
The NFL's new ban on helmet-to-helmet hits with the threat of suspensions and steep fines seemed to be working for a week or so. Then came Sunday, with at least two players staggered by hard hits to the head, including one during the Eagles game in which an Indianapolis player was knocked out for 10 minutes. The Eagles hit was ruled incidental to a two-man tackle, but Colts player Austin Collie nonetheless came away with a concussion. Meanwhile, a Green Bay Packers hit resulted in a $50,000 fine.
NEWS
September 18, 2002 | By Kaitlin Gurney INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Kingsway Regional High School student Melissa Colon was at junior varsity soccer practice last week when a soccer ball slammed into her temple. After the 15-year-old complained of a headache and dizziness, school officials had her whisked to Crozer-Chester Medical Center in Upland, Delaware County, where it was discovered that she had a subdural hematoma, a potentially fatal bleeding of the brain. Doctors operated immediately, and hospital officials said the Swedesboro girl remained in critical condition yesterday.
SPORTS
September 17, 2003 | By Shannon Ryan INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The rest of the Catholic League athletic schedule will be played as planned. It's how the postseason will play out that remains open to debate. Options will be discussed tomorrow, when league athletic directors meet to determine how to handle sports seasons interrupted by a teachers' strike in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia. Athletic directors determined in a meeting yesterday that sports will resume immediately. The group weighed how much of a risk there would be in contact sports, considering that teams had not competed for two weekends and were banned from practicing with coaches for more than a week.
NEWS
April 26, 1986
Women have been screaming for equal rights for a long time. They want to do everything that their male counterparts do. They no longer want to be considered the weaker sex. They fought and protested to gain access to the man's world. Well they finally made it. We now have women in the police and fire departments, they are driving trucks and bulldozers, they are in the military, and they are even playing contact sports. I think this is all well and fine. If a woman is qualified to do any of the above, good for her. But remember, equality is a whole lot more than doing the same work and playing the same sports as a man. It means accepting the bad with the good.
NEWS
March 4, 1988 | Marc Schogol and including reports from Children, Seventeen and American Demographics magazines, and Inquirer wire services
DIET-PILL ORDERS SEIZED. If you've sent away for the "Fat Magnet," don't expect it anytime soon. Pending a hearing, postal inspectors are impounding mail orders for the pill, nationally advertised as the "lazy way" to lose weight. A federal prosecutor says the company may be fraudulently promoting the pill, which it claims absorbs and flushes fat out of the body. The pill doesn't have Federal Drug Administration approval, but the company, which insists the pill is legitimate, says no approval is needed.
NEWS
October 20, 2010
Eagles wide receiver DeSean Jackson joined the ranks of brain-injured National Football League players on Sunday. The toll is an almost weekly reminder that the league still hasn't taken the necessary steps to make the game safer. But that may change, finally, with league officials announcing Tuesday that they will impose suspensions on players for delivering devastating helmet-to-helmet hits. The pros, whose style of smashmouth play is emulated by younger players, can't move soon enough on player safety concerns.
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NEWS
August 30, 2014 | By Kathy Boccella, Inquirer Staff Writer
At the Shipley School in Bryn Mawr, athletic officials say they care more about blocking head injuries than blocking free kicks. The private Main Line school on Thursday banned middle school soccer players from heading the ball - the first school in the nation to do so - and also said most high school athletes will wear sensors to measure both the frequency and intensity of blows to the head. "We've seen a growing trend of injuries in our students, severe head injuries," said athletic director Mark Duncan.
NEWS
March 26, 2014
Long-shot solution I don't see how the solution for Atlantic City and New Jersey is to open up sports betting for the masses and reduce chasing the American dream to placing a wager on professional and college teams ("A push to legalize sports betting," March 20). Politicians will create more problems than they will solve with this so-called solution. People need to chase their dreams with a well-paying job, not invest what little they have in a pipe dream delivered by hacks who want to run state and federal government on their backs.
NEWS
May 5, 2013 | By Kate Giammarise, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
HARRISBURG - A dispute involving a decades-old law that allows boys to play on girls' high school sports teams appears to be headed to court. Lawyers representing the Pennsylvania Interscholastic Athletic Association - which says it would like the law changed to make sure girls do not lose athletic opportunities and for safety reasons - and Attorney General Kathleen Kane's office met Friday afternoon in Commonwealth Court. "It looks like we are headed toward an evidentiary hearing of some sort," Pittsburgh lawyer Mary Grenen said after the status conference between the two sides.
SPORTS
February 12, 2012 | By Jonathan Tamari, Inquirer Staff Writer
The debate and discussion over concussions and their consequences have moved beyond the spotlight of professional sports. According to neurologists, that's a good thing. In college, high school, and youth leagues, awareness is growing. "This is one of those slow awakenings of, 'There's a real problem, there's a real danger,' " said Doug Smith, director of the Center for Brain Injury and Repair at the University of Pennsylvania. Awareness of concussions and their lasting impact has grown among the general public in the last five years, he said.
NEWS
November 10, 2010
The NFL's new ban on helmet-to-helmet hits with the threat of suspensions and steep fines seemed to be working for a week or so. Then came Sunday, with at least two players staggered by hard hits to the head, including one during the Eagles game in which an Indianapolis player was knocked out for 10 minutes. The Eagles hit was ruled incidental to a two-man tackle, but Colts player Austin Collie nonetheless came away with a concussion. Meanwhile, a Green Bay Packers hit resulted in a $50,000 fine.
NEWS
October 20, 2010
Eagles wide receiver DeSean Jackson joined the ranks of brain-injured National Football League players on Sunday. The toll is an almost weekly reminder that the league still hasn't taken the necessary steps to make the game safer. But that may change, finally, with league officials announcing Tuesday that they will impose suspensions on players for delivering devastating helmet-to-helmet hits. The pros, whose style of smashmouth play is emulated by younger players, can't move soon enough on player safety concerns.
SPORTS
January 28, 2009 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
The Wisconsin Supreme Court ruled yesterday that high school cheerleading is a contact sport and therefore its participants cannot be sued for accidentally causing injuries. The court ruled that a former high school cheerleader cannot sue a teammate who failed to stop her fall while she was practicing a stunt. The court also said the injured cheerleader cannot sue her school district. The National Cheer Safety Foundation said the decision is the first of its kind in the nation.
SPORTS
September 17, 2003 | By Shannon Ryan INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The rest of the Catholic League athletic schedule will be played as planned. It's how the postseason will play out that remains open to debate. Options will be discussed tomorrow, when league athletic directors meet to determine how to handle sports seasons interrupted by a teachers' strike in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia. Athletic directors determined in a meeting yesterday that sports will resume immediately. The group weighed how much of a risk there would be in contact sports, considering that teams had not competed for two weekends and were banned from practicing with coaches for more than a week.
SPORTS
September 8, 2003 | By Rick O'Brien and Shannon Ryan INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
William Tennent's Rick Brauning has set a few personal goals for this season. "I'd like to hit 1,000 yards and score 15 to 20 touchdowns," the senior running back said. From his performance in Friday's season opener against visiting Sun Valley, Brauning is on track. He rushed nine times for 117 yards and three touchdowns in a 38-7 win. The 6-foot, 185-pounder scored on runs of 12, 6 and 49 yards. Last season, Tennent lost its first six games by a combined score of 174-46 and went 3-8 overall and 1-4 in the Suburban One League's Liberty Division.
SPORTS
September 5, 2003 | By Joe Santoliquito and Marc Narducci INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Joan Feeney didn't expect her debut as coach at Archbishop Ryan to begin this way. Feeney, who graduated from the school in 1980, has seen the early stages of the Catholic League season interrupted by the teachers' strike. No sports teams at Ryan will practice or play games during the strike. The strike forced the postponement of Ryan's opener Wednesday against Little Flower, which reached the Catholic League title game last fall. "We've been looking forward to it and the girls were so upset," Feeney said.
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