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Contemporary Art

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NEWS
February 2, 2012 | Associated Press
LOS ANGELES - Mike Kelley, 57, described by colleagues as an "irresistible force" in contemporary art, has died, police said Wednesday. Mr. Kelley was found at his home Tuesday, an apparent suicide, South Pasadena Police Sgt. Robert Bartl said. There was no further information on the artist's death; an autopsy was pending. "Kelley's work in the 1980s was part of how one defined the Los Angeles arts scene. He had a remarkable ability to fuse distinction between fine and popular art in ways that managed to perturb our sense of decorum," said Stephanie Barron, senior curator of modern art at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. A family friend, concerned about Mr. Kelley, went to his home and called 911, Bartl said.
NEWS
October 18, 1999 | by Glenn D. Lowry
One of the most disturbing aspects of the controversy over the Brooklyn Museum of Art's exhibition "Sensation" is the hostility to contemporary art that it has elicited. Long after the dust settles, there will be a lingering sense that all contemporary art is offensive, even disgusting, and unworthy of our attention. What is it about our society that makes so many of us intolerant of contemporary art? Why are we so quick to condemn that which we do not understand, to dismiss that which forces us to confront disturbing issues?
NEWS
June 3, 2013 | By Edith Newhall, For The Inquirer
Not so long ago, the Woodmere Art Museum's annual juried exhibition was ruled by landscape and figure paintings and evocative photographs of Manayunk and the Wissahickon. The show was also a sprawling, democratic affair that took up most of the museum. You couldn't help but think that the outside jurors hired by the museum threw up their hands at the sheer volume of submissions and opted to pack the galleries rather than parse the good from the mediocre. No more. Last year's 71st annual exhibition clearly reflected the preferences of its juror, figurative painter and PAFA professor Alex Kanevsky, who also pared it to 46 artists.
NEWS
January 20, 1991
Incongruity was the word University of Pennsylvania President Sheldon Hackney used, and it well captured many of the sensations at Thursday night's black-tie gathering to dedicate the Institute of Contemporary Art's new building. For, as brief speeches were made, the striking new galleries opened and dinner served, America was at war, and late arrivals at the spiffy party were bringing the news that Israel had been hit by Iraqi missiles. Incongruous perhaps, but illuminating also.
NEWS
June 2, 1989 | By Huntly Collins, Inquirer Staff Writer
Peter P. Rosenau, 61, a patron of contemporary art who was known for the modern art that adorned his home and his droll sense of humor, died of cancer Wednesday at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital. A resident of Bryn Mawr, Mr. Rosenau was president of the Puro Filter Co. of Philadelphia, which installs and services water coolers and filters. The firm was begun by Mr. Rosenau's father, Richard P. Rosenau, 50 years ago. Mr. Rosenau was born in Philadelphia and graduated from Germantown Friends School, where he was a star athlete and earned a place on the all-Philadelphia soccer team.
NEWS
July 9, 2006 | By Edith Newhall FOR THE INQUIRER
The paintings and photographs have just arrived at the ICEBOX Project Space, on a desolate stretch of American Street in Kensington, and are stacked against walls. Unassembled sculptures crowd the floors. A young woman, one of the University of Pennsylvania MFA candidates involved in the end-of-year exhibition, is told that her installation will have to be moved. Tears ensue. A pale young man sits solemn-faced on the floor, trying to figure out how he will hang his intricate cut-paper piece on a wall that will clearly not accept pushpins.
NEWS
January 14, 2011 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
Louis Kahn was considered a pretty good modern architect in 1945 when Anne Griswold Tyng went to work in his office, then located in the Evening Bulletin building across from Philadelphia's City Hall. By the time they parted company two decades later, Kahn was revered for liberating architecture from its Bauhaus straitjacket and Tyng was known, if she was known at all, as his mistress. Had they embarked on their storied collaboration today, one imagines Tyng sharing the credit for their breakthrough work, especially the Yale Art Gallery and the Trenton Bath House.
LIVING
December 25, 2000 | By Edward J. Sozanski, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
When Claudia Gould, director of the Institute of Contemporary Art, began to look for a curator to succeed Judith Tannenbaum, who left the ICA last spring, she thought first of Ingrid Schaffner, a New York writer and independent curator with a number of exhibitions to her credit. However, Gould said, Shaffner didn't want to become involved with an institution full time, so she initially declined the offer to come to Philadelphia. When Gould's subsequent search for a full-time curator proved unproductive, she returned to Shaffner and suggested a part-time affiliation, an arrangement that suited her better.
NEWS
August 26, 2015 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
Marion Boulton "Kippy" Stroud, 76, the seemingly indefatigable founder and director of the Fabric Workshop and Museum in Philadelphia and the Acadia Summer Arts Program - a.k.a. "Kamp Kippy" - in Maine, died suddenly Saturday, Aug. 22, at her home in Northeast Harbor, Maine. She was, said Timothy Rub, director of the Philadelphia Museum of Art, of great significance both to the Art Museum, where she was a long-serving trustee, and to the world of contemporary art, where she championed textiles as a medium and, ultimately, all things fashioned by hand.
NEWS
September 6, 2015 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
Daniel W. Dietrich II, 73, a self-effacing philanthropist who valued quiet exploration as much as artistic adventure, died Tuesday, Sept. 1, at Paoli Hospital. Mr. Dietrich, who lived in Chester County, was heir to a family conglomerate that once counted Luden's cough drops among its assets. He was vice president of Luden's, based in Reading, for a time, but his tastes ultimately ran more toward cultural activities than business endeavors. A longtime board member and supporter of the University of Pennsylvania's Institute of Contemporary Art, Mr. Dietrich made a bold statement about his interests this year when he gave $10 million to ICA to form an endowment that would enhance the scope and flexibility of the institution's curatorial efforts.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 30, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
B. Herbert Lee, 92, a businessman and philanthropist and grandson of the founder of the former Lee Tire & Rubber Co., died of respiratory failure Tuesday, April 19, at Waverly Heights in Gladwyne. Mr. Lee lived in Haverford and Bryn Mawr before retiring to Waverly Heights in 2008. He also maintained a winter home in Delray Beach, Fla. His family was once well-known as the largest employer in Conshohocken, according to the records of the Historical Society of Pennsylvania. His grandfather J. Ellwood Lee created the tire manufacturing operation in 1912 as a spin-off from his J. Ellwood Lee Chemical Co., a maker of medical supplies that merged with Johnson & Johnson in 1905.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 2016
Art Museums & Institutions African American Heritage Museum 661 Jackson Rd., Newtonville; 609-704-5495. www.aahmsnj.org . Glynnis Reed, Anne Taylor Glapion, and Leonard R. Wilkinson Exhibit. Free. Tue.-Fri. 10 am-3 pm. The Barnes Foundation - Philadelphia 2025 Benjamin Franklin Pkwy.; 215-278-7000. www.barnesfoundation.org . Permanent Collection. Picasso: The Great War, Experimentation & Change. $14; $29, $27 seniors, $15 students and children includes collection admission.
NEWS
March 20, 2016 | By Clark DeLeon
The Most Interesting Man in the World died on a Friday, which is just another Christian coincidence in the story of Joe Tiberino, whom I spoke to for the last time about a week after he had risen from the dead. "I was sitting right here when I died the first time," he said from an upholstered armchair in his second-floor bedroom in the family home in West Philadelphia, the heart of a multi-rowhouse enclave that could be called an artists' colony because everyone who lives there becomes an artist sooner or later.
NEWS
March 14, 2016 | By Jake Blumgart
Traditionally, it is the audience that ingests large quantities of intoxicants before a comedy show. But this week, at the Philadelphia Mausoleum of Contemporary Art (PhilaMOCA), it's the performers who will be inebriated. Stoned, to be specific, although with one exception. This will be the seventh "episode" of "Weeding Out the Stoned," an ongoing series presented by the Good Good Comedy troupe. The concept is simple: Get 15 comedians on stage and have them perform a variety of word games, stunts, and feats of dexterity while the audience tries to guess which is the lone sober individual.
NEWS
March 13, 2016
Angel Nevarez and Valerie Tevere Through March 27 . Rodney McMillian: "The Black Show" Through Aug. 14 . Institute of Contemporary Art, 118 S. 36th St. 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. Wednesday; 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Thursday and Friday; 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. Free.215-898-7108 or www.icaphila.org .
NEWS
March 10, 2016 | By Valerie Russ, Staff Writer
AMONG THE CLATTER of beer bottles and old acquaintances chatting, the crowd at Dirty Franks raised their drinks "to Joe!" after every speaker shared a personal memory of Joseph Tiberino on Tuesday. Tiberino, 77, a stylish, well-known artist, died Feb. 19 after a yearlong illness, said one of his sons, Raphael. "He was always there for me, in good times or bad," said Joe Brenman, a sculptor, who spoke at the Center City bar at 13th and Pine Streets. "To Joe!" the crowd shouted.
NEWS
February 29, 2016 | By Jake Blumgart
Certain forms of artistic expression seem almost intentionally off-putting. That's fine of course. There must be space for art where mass appeal is not the goal, where the creator hopes to break through to something different, something new. For the average consumer immersed in the culture that the rebel is striving to tear down, it can be a deeply unpleasant experience. Imagine how abrasive the Sex Pistols seemed to the disco-attuned ears of the 1970s. Today it is hard to imagine what the fuss was about.
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