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NEWS
January 17, 2002
MY WIFE and I just attended the car show. Both of us had few different cars we were interested in looking at. We are serious car-buyers looking for ease in shopping by going to the show. My problem is the parents who bring small children and let them loose in the cars. Where are people's heads at that they let a small child stand on the seat of a Lincoln playing with the steering wheel - while an adult is standing there waiting to check it out? My son and his wife also saw the same thing the night they attended.
NEWS
June 19, 1986
I am awed by the story of the 19-year-old unmarried mother of three who "needed" an abortion because she couldn't manage a fourth on welfare. Doesn't she understand what she's doing to become pregnant? Doesn't she know or care about birth control? Don't she and the father realize that they should not beget children that they have no way of supporting? The attitude seems to be, "Poor me, I was just standing here minding my own business and look what happened!" I'm sure taxpaying citizens don't want her to be pregnant again, but abortion is not birth control; in this case it's a sign of a body out of control.
NEWS
November 21, 2000
The center of gravity in American life has shifted away from partisan politics and into other areas of activity in which individuals ... have far greater hopes for gaining satisfaction. ... Aiding and abetting such developments is a consumer culture that by and large responds to customer demand by increasing hours, service and product selection ... In a word, American life is increasingly characterized by choice. Which may also explain why people increasingly see politics as irrelevant to their lives: Politics remains fundamentally a realm of control, not choice.
NEWS
June 10, 2003 | By Bruce H. Mann
Opponents of the Barnes Foundation's petition to move from Lower Merion to the Parkway claim that part of that petition - the proposal to expand the board of trustees - is a racially-motivated effort by white-dominated foundations to wrest control of the Barnes from Lincoln University, the oldest historically black college in the nation. This serious charge has given both donors and the public pause in considering whether to relocate the magnificent art treasure that is the Barnes Foundation.
SPORTS
February 28, 2010 | By Matt Gelb INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It was five innings out of 328 in a professional career that began with high expectations and now has spanned three minor-league seasons. No, for a former first-round draft pick, five triple-A innings in the first game of a lazy September doubleheader at Allentown's Coca-Cola Park are nothing to celebrate. Yet Joe Savery said he never felt better about five innings in his life. In his seven games last season with Lehigh Valley, the Phillies' triple-A affiliate, Savery walked 5.5 batters per nine innings.
NEWS
January 27, 1986 | By Matt Schuman, Special to The Inquirer
During an early-season match against Souderton, Upper Dublin's Miguel DelValle was on the receiving end of what he perceived to be a cheap shot by his opponent. "I thought about hitting him back but I decided to forget about it and just wrestle," DelValle recalled. "I ended up winning the match, and the best part was knowing that it wouldn't have happened that way a year ago. Last year, I would have sucker-punched him and gotten myself disqualified. " According to Upper Dublin coach Bob Masonis, whose roof DelValle has lived under for the last 3 years, his star light-middleweight (119-126 pounds)
ENTERTAINMENT
April 18, 1989 | By Alan Carter, New York Daily News
Two decades ago, when he was just a kid in high school, Tony Danza worked part-time washing dishes at a catering firm. He was a bit of a dreamer. "Yeah, I mostly dreamed of getting out of work," he said, laughing, "and when I really dreamed, I dreamed that maybe someday I'd actually make it to kitchen steward. " These days, the popular "Who's the Boss?" star is still cleaning up - but now it's on TV. And Danza, 38, is looking to the big screen as well. In "She's Out of Control," which opened Friday, he plays a father concerned with his teen daughter's budding sexuality.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 6, 1987 | By GENE SEYMOUR, Daily News Staff Writer
It was the early 1960s, when television slipped from its so-called "Golden Age" into a "vast wasteland. " Week after week, the Clampetts, Flintstones and other cathode-forged American families conducted their business reliably and predictably. Even at its rare best, TV back in those days wasn't taxing your sensibilities or straining your nerves. No surprises also meant no real challenges. Then on a Monday night in September 1963, on your local ABC-TV affiliate, a voice sounding as frenzied as an airline pilot on downers blandly intoned the following over an oscillating, nearly pitch-dark screen: "There is nothing wrong with your television set. Do not attempt to adjust the picture.
NEWS
May 2, 2001
Your editorial (April 24) misses the mark saying "abortions would be far fewer. . .if reliable birth control were made available. " Reliable birth and VD control are available. It's even free at public health and Planned Parenthood offices. Check a local drugstore. Unmarried teen-agers, living at home with their baby, made a choice. They didn't get preggers because of unavailable birth control, but because they are stupid and their parents are weak. Those choosing abortion would have saved stress on their bodies by choosing contraceptives.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 2016 | By Carolyn Hax, Advice Columnist
Question: My younger brother, 29, was diagnosed with cancer yesterday. He's the healthy, fit one of the family, so it is extremely unexpected. As the oldest, I have always looked out for my younger brothers, and now I just feel helpless. I don't know how to process this. He lives about 2,000 miles away and hasn't decided whether he's going to do his treatment in our hometown (an area with abundant medical resources) or where he lives now. Any advice? Answer: I'm sorry about the tough news.
NEWS
August 18, 2016 | By Claudia Vargas, Staff Writer
Former Mayor Michael Nutter called City Controller Alan Butkovitz "a liar, a snake, and a hypocrite" Tuesday in response to a controller's report that more than $380,000 in Philadelphia Marathon proceeds were used as a "slush fund" under Nutter's watch. The report, released Tuesday, said the money was used in part for unapproved grants, a trip to Rome by Nutter and his staff, and an open-bar reception last year. The spending was approved solely by the chairwoman of the fund at the time, former City Representative Desiree Peterkin Bell, according to Butkovitz, with no oversight by the fund's board of directors, effectively circumventing the board's policies and control checks.
NEWS
August 11, 2016 | By Laura McCrystal and Craig R. McCoy, STAFF WRITERS
Pennsylvania Attorney General Kathleen G. Kane was "on a mission, a mission of revenge," when she orchestrated a "cloak-and-dagger" operation to illegally leak information to vilify a critic, prosecutors said Tuesday in the opening of Kane's trial on perjury and obstruction charges. To the contrary, Kane was a victim grappling with lies from her former second-in-command and a political consultant who have repeatedly covered up their own roles in the leak, her defense argued before the jury in Montgomery County Court in Norristown.
NEWS
August 5, 2016 | By Aubrey Whelan, Staff Writer
By 2021, the Philadelphia School District will have a $600 million budget deficit, City Controller Alan Butkovitz said Wednesday - and he's asking Mayor Kenney to give his office more auditing authority over the district to "avoid fiscal calamity. " Under current rules, Butkovitz said, his office can review only the district's financial statements. He wants to be able to conduct performance reviews, and look more closely at how the district spends money and grants contracts. "We just need the authorization to cut through the red tape and inspect all of the pages in their books," the controller said in the statement.
NEWS
August 5, 2016 | By Stu Bykofsky
FIRST, THE GOOD news: Vickie and Mark Remolde got their dog Jake back alive, if damaged. The bad news: It almost didn't happen, because of confusion at the front desk at Philadelphia's animal shelter, the Animal Care and Control Team. July 13, Mark, 58, was doing yard work at their Roxborough home when Jake, a 4-year-old pit-bull mix, slipped out and vanished. "I'm hysterical that Jake's missing," said Vickie, who took to social media to post pictures of Jake. She doggedly hung fliers in the neighborhood and contacted the Montgomery County SPCA.
NEWS
July 28, 2016 | By Caitlin McCabe, Staff Writer
By sheer logistics, Ruth Donnelly and Dorothy Johnson-Speight might have never met. In 2001, Johnson-Speight was 52, living in the Mount Airy section of Philadelphia, working as a mental health therapist. Donnelly was 43, living in Olney, and working in education. Five miles separated them. They lived in different worlds. But profound tragedy - and coincidence - linked the two: Both lost their sons to murder. Both sons were killed by the same man, just five months - and two blocks - apart.
NEWS
July 21, 2016 | By Jonathan Tamari, Washington Bureau
CLEVELAND - In the VIP section of the Republican convention sat some of Donald Trump's A-list allies - son Donald Jr., neurosurgeon Ben Carson, and Bob Dole, the only previous GOP nominee willing to show up here to support the party's new standard-bearer. As a swarm of media buzzed around them, a burly man from Pennsylvania watched, spoke quickly to a succession of convention staffers, and calculated who should arrive next. In the VIP area, David Urban plays "air-traffic controller," as he put it, for party luminaries, spouses, and key guests who want a spot in the area that comes with national exposure as television cameras cut to reaction shots.
NEWS
July 18, 2016
ISSUE | CULTURE OF VIOLENCE Stop glorifying guns and demand controls It's time to stop our irresponsible state of denial. We immerse our kids in thrilling scenes of a dozen macho men pointing guns at each other. Children watch the good guy kill 20 bad guys with a pistol, while the bad guys can't hit the side of a barn with AR-15s. Is it a surprise kids grow up thinking guns are the answer to life's problems? We do not allow nudity or explicit sex scenes on prime-time TV, so why so much violence?
NEWS
July 14, 2016 | By Claudia Vargas, Staff Writer
The city controller is asking that the Kenney administration conduct an inventory of the city's 2,700 facilities. As part of his annual audit of the city's financial statement for fiscal 2015, which ended on June 30 of last year, Controller Alan Butkovitz said the city does not periodically check the condition of its real estate assets, which include police stations, fire houses, recreation centers, libraries, and historic mansions. "A failure to inventory has increased the risk of inaccurate accounting records for the city," Butkovitz said in a statement.
NEWS
July 12, 2016
ISSUE | COLLEGE Out-of-control costs I agree wholeheartedly that something must be done about the unsustainable rise of college costs (" Let's graduate from this crisis ," Tuesday). Politicians only seem to talk about providing more taxpayer dollars. They don't get to the heart of the matter: Why are higher education costs rising so much faster than wages? My youngest child is heading off to the same private college I attended. The tuition and fees in 1978-79, when I was a freshman, were $3,771, compared with $52,186 in 2016-17.
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