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NEWS
January 17, 2002
MY WIFE and I just attended the car show. Both of us had few different cars we were interested in looking at. We are serious car-buyers looking for ease in shopping by going to the show. My problem is the parents who bring small children and let them loose in the cars. Where are people's heads at that they let a small child stand on the seat of a Lincoln playing with the steering wheel - while an adult is standing there waiting to check it out? My son and his wife also saw the same thing the night they attended.
NEWS
June 19, 1986
I am awed by the story of the 19-year-old unmarried mother of three who "needed" an abortion because she couldn't manage a fourth on welfare. Doesn't she understand what she's doing to become pregnant? Doesn't she know or care about birth control? Don't she and the father realize that they should not beget children that they have no way of supporting? The attitude seems to be, "Poor me, I was just standing here minding my own business and look what happened!" I'm sure taxpaying citizens don't want her to be pregnant again, but abortion is not birth control; in this case it's a sign of a body out of control.
NEWS
November 21, 2000
The center of gravity in American life has shifted away from partisan politics and into other areas of activity in which individuals ... have far greater hopes for gaining satisfaction. ... Aiding and abetting such developments is a consumer culture that by and large responds to customer demand by increasing hours, service and product selection ... In a word, American life is increasingly characterized by choice. Which may also explain why people increasingly see politics as irrelevant to their lives: Politics remains fundamentally a realm of control, not choice.
NEWS
June 10, 2003 | By Bruce H. Mann
Opponents of the Barnes Foundation's petition to move from Lower Merion to the Parkway claim that part of that petition - the proposal to expand the board of trustees - is a racially-motivated effort by white-dominated foundations to wrest control of the Barnes from Lincoln University, the oldest historically black college in the nation. This serious charge has given both donors and the public pause in considering whether to relocate the magnificent art treasure that is the Barnes Foundation.
SPORTS
February 28, 2010 | By Matt Gelb INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It was five innings out of 328 in a professional career that began with high expectations and now has spanned three minor-league seasons. No, for a former first-round draft pick, five triple-A innings in the first game of a lazy September doubleheader at Allentown's Coca-Cola Park are nothing to celebrate. Yet Joe Savery said he never felt better about five innings in his life. In his seven games last season with Lehigh Valley, the Phillies' triple-A affiliate, Savery walked 5.5 batters per nine innings.
NEWS
January 27, 1986 | By Matt Schuman, Special to The Inquirer
During an early-season match against Souderton, Upper Dublin's Miguel DelValle was on the receiving end of what he perceived to be a cheap shot by his opponent. "I thought about hitting him back but I decided to forget about it and just wrestle," DelValle recalled. "I ended up winning the match, and the best part was knowing that it wouldn't have happened that way a year ago. Last year, I would have sucker-punched him and gotten myself disqualified. " According to Upper Dublin coach Bob Masonis, whose roof DelValle has lived under for the last 3 years, his star light-middleweight (119-126 pounds)
ENTERTAINMENT
April 18, 1989 | By Alan Carter, New York Daily News
Two decades ago, when he was just a kid in high school, Tony Danza worked part-time washing dishes at a catering firm. He was a bit of a dreamer. "Yeah, I mostly dreamed of getting out of work," he said, laughing, "and when I really dreamed, I dreamed that maybe someday I'd actually make it to kitchen steward. " These days, the popular "Who's the Boss?" star is still cleaning up - but now it's on TV. And Danza, 38, is looking to the big screen as well. In "She's Out of Control," which opened Friday, he plays a father concerned with his teen daughter's budding sexuality.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 6, 1987 | By GENE SEYMOUR, Daily News Staff Writer
It was the early 1960s, when television slipped from its so-called "Golden Age" into a "vast wasteland. " Week after week, the Clampetts, Flintstones and other cathode-forged American families conducted their business reliably and predictably. Even at its rare best, TV back in those days wasn't taxing your sensibilities or straining your nerves. No surprises also meant no real challenges. Then on a Monday night in September 1963, on your local ABC-TV affiliate, a voice sounding as frenzied as an airline pilot on downers blandly intoned the following over an oscillating, nearly pitch-dark screen: "There is nothing wrong with your television set. Do not attempt to adjust the picture.
NEWS
May 2, 2001
Your editorial (April 24) misses the mark saying "abortions would be far fewer. . .if reliable birth control were made available. " Reliable birth and VD control are available. It's even free at public health and Planned Parenthood offices. Check a local drugstore. Unmarried teen-agers, living at home with their baby, made a choice. They didn't get preggers because of unavailable birth control, but because they are stupid and their parents are weak. Those choosing abortion would have saved stress on their bodies by choosing contraceptives.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 15, 2016 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Staff Writer
Contractors overcharged the city for nearly $1.3 million last year, sometimes sending bills for work that was never done, according to a new report from City Controller Alan Butkovitz. Butkovitz said the city did not pay the overcharges because they were caught by a pre-audit team in his office, which approached the contractors and corrected the mistakes. In a statement Butkovitz said the team "keeps a very close watch on the city's construction projects. " More than $272,000 of the $1.3 million was charged by a contractor working on asbestos-remediation projects, Butkovitz said.
NEWS
September 9, 2016 | By Michaelle Bond, Staff Writer
Alarmed by the proliferation of digital billboards in Pennsylvania, residents, environmentalists, and local officials had the same message for state lawmakers Wednesday: Give municipalities more power to restrict electronic signage. "Without our intervention, [companies] will find such creative places to install their billboards," said Phil Dague, a Downingtown Borough Council member. "Every nook and cranny of the state will be affected. " Dague was among about 10 people who testified at a hearing called by the Senate Democratic Policy Committee on how to strengthen a bill introduced in June by Sen. Andy Dinniman (D., Chester)
NEWS
September 9, 2016 | By Carolyn Hax, Advice Columnist
Adapted from a recent online discussion. Question: I grew up with a father and sister who were pretty controlling. They insisted they wanted to hear your opinion just so they could argue and pick it apart. Eventually, the decision would be whatever they wanted in the first place. I created a rule for myself: I'd give three suggestions, and after my third "no," I'd give up. It saved me a lot of headaches and adjusted my expectations . . . until I got married. Five years in, I can think of two occasions where my husband took a suggestion I made.
NEWS
September 9, 2016 | By Claudia Vargas, Staff Writer
The federal government has taken regulatory control of large billboards and digital displays along the Market Street East corridor away from Philadelphia, saying the city had not been responsive to questions about enforcement. In a letter issued last month, the Federal Highway Administration ordered that the city return control of outdoor advertising there to the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation. Outdoor advertising control "for all parts of the city of Philadelphia must immediately be under PennDot's exclusive control," Renee Sigel, the Pennsylvania division administrator for the FHWA, wrote in the letter.
NEWS
September 1, 2016
It was bad enough pharmaceutical giant Mylan jacked up the price of the life-saving EpiPen from $100 to $600 since 2007, but when it announced this week it would sell an identical generic for $300, it underscored the maddening state of American health care. The EpiPen, which gives people with severe allergies an emergency dosage of epinephrine, is an exclusive product of Mylan. Competitors are developing alternatives, but some hit unexpected setbacks or may not be ready for market for a year or two. That gives Mylan control over its drug costs for now, something free marketers may argue the company should have.
NEWS
August 28, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
Andrew White Jr., 72, of West Philadelphia, a former loss mitigation specialist and church security guard, died Monday, Aug. 15, of cancer at Einstein Medical Center. Mr. White was the only child of Hazel H. White and the late Andrew White Sr. He was born in Philadelphia and graduated from John Bartram High School. While there, Mr. White was a guard on the football team. He received many honors for his skill at that position, his family said. Mr. White enlisted in the Army National Guard in January 1965.
NEWS
August 26, 2016 | By Justine McDaniel, Staff Writer
Picking up the backing of the gun-control group CeaseFirePA in a war of endorsements, Democratic U.S. Senate nominee Katie McGinty pledged Wednesday to work with Pennsylvania sportsmen and hunters on gun measures if she is elected. McGinty said her Republican rival, Sen. Pat Toomey, views gun control "as a political calculation, as compared to a matter of principle," and slammed him for not acting on gun measures since he and Sen. Joe Manchin (D., W. Va.) cosponsored a failed bill for background checks in 2013.
NEWS
August 24, 2016 | By Justine McDaniel, Staff Writer
A gun-safety group founded by former U.S. Rep. Gabby Giffords endorsed Sen. Pat Toomey (R., Pa.) Monday, adding to a growing list of gun-control supporters backing the incumbent. The political action committee, Americans for Responsible Solutions, said it hopes to line up more support for its cause among congressional Republicans like Toomey. At the same time, its backing could help the incumbent, locked in an ever-closer race with Democrat Katie McGinty, attract moderate voters. Giffords and her husband, astronaut Mark Kelly, announced the endorsement in an opinion piece written for CNN - but said their decision in Pennsylvania was difficult.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 2016 | By Carolyn Hax, Advice Columnist
Question: My younger brother, 29, was diagnosed with cancer yesterday. He's the healthy, fit one of the family, so it is extremely unexpected. As the oldest, I have always looked out for my younger brothers, and now I just feel helpless. I don't know how to process this. He lives about 2,000 miles away and hasn't decided whether he's going to do his treatment in our hometown (an area with abundant medical resources) or where he lives now. Any advice? Answer: I'm sorry about the tough news.
NEWS
August 18, 2016 | By Claudia Vargas, Staff Writer
Former Mayor Michael Nutter called City Controller Alan Butkovitz "a liar, a snake, and a hypocrite" Tuesday in response to a controller's report that more than $380,000 in Philadelphia Marathon proceeds were used as a "slush fund" under Nutter's watch. The report, released Tuesday, said the money was used in part for unapproved grants, a trip to Rome by Nutter and his staff, and an open-bar reception last year. The spending was approved solely by the chairwoman of the fund at the time, former City Representative Desiree Peterkin Bell, according to Butkovitz, with no oversight by the fund's board of directors, effectively circumventing the board's policies and control checks.
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