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Convention Hall

NEWS
July 14, 1988 | By Edgar Williams, Inquirer Staff Writer
The man approached Howard Lanin with a fistful of currency and an offer to share the wealth. "In about an hour," the man said, "we'll be walking out. All you've got to do when I give you the signal is play 'Dixie,' and this is yours. " He thrust the bills at Lanin. Howard Lanin told the fellow to get lost. And so the famous Southern segregationist walkout from the 1948 Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia, which occurred 40 years ago today, took place without benefit of musical accompaniment.
NEWS
January 12, 2008 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In this nearly all-Victorian beach resort, some residents were shocked that plans for a $10 million beachfront convention center didn't include a fancy porch or even a single carved turret. But its designers had not looked that far into the past for inspiration. Instead, the two-story facility that is to open by 2010 will borrow elements from a convention center that was built in 1917 and then flattened by the great March storm of 1962. "I was surprised that when it was announced we would be replacing the existing Convention Hall, talk began to center among residents about the 1917 building," said Skip Loughlin, chairman of the Cape May City Historic Preservation Commission.
SPORTS
November 16, 2010 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Staff Writer
In eight days, when a four-ton wrecking ball begins to pummel it like a Broad Street Bully, the Spectrum, a landmark arena that launched a sporting renaissance in Philadelphia, will crumble into oblivion after months of pre-demolition ballyhoo but almost no opposition. Its impending demise points out something contradictory about this sports-mad city: No matter how rich their history, Philadelphia venues such as Convention Hall, Connie Mack Stadium, Municipal Stadium, the old Arena, and now the Spectrum seem to be expendable in a way that more historically authentic or architecturally appealing structures often are not. While threats to old and ornate buildings or to prized works of art (remember the battles that kept Thomas Eakins' The Gross Clinic and Maxfield Parrish's Dream Garden in Philadelphia?
NEWS
November 5, 1998 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The sound that fills the cavernous hall on the Boardwalk is so large, so magnificent, so stirring that it would seem only the ocean a few steps away could surpass it in grandeur. Internet rumors to the contrary, the largest pipe organ in the world has not been walled up inside the old Convention Hall on the Boardwalk. Its eight pipe chambers have not been converted into meeting rooms. Its parts - both massive and intricate - have not been consumed by flood. Just ask the 8,000 screaming boxing fans who on Halloween night heard the organ played for only the second time this year, heralding the entrance of preening featherweight champion "Prince" Naseem Hamed in true Phantom of the Opera style.
NEWS
May 26, 1994 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
While two battalions of firefighters were quelling a fire that seared a section of the roof of the famous Convention Center and Visitors Bureau, their off-duty counterparts were across town to witness City Council's approval of a contract that raised their pay. The fire, according to officials, may have been started around 2 p.m. when sparks came in contact with roofing materials as welders were installing a new section of the circular peaked Convention...
NEWS
August 31, 2004 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
The Republican National Convention's unscripted moments last night came from filmmaker Michael Moore, whose movie Fahrenheit 9/11 skewers President Bush and the war in Iraq. Moore, who is writing a convention column for USA Today, caused a minor stir when he tried to enter the convention hall as a member of the press. After some confusion over the credentials for his security guard, Moore was escorted to the press seats. Republican catcalls began to erupt in his direction.
NEWS
December 10, 1987 | By CYNTHIA BURTON, Daily News Staff Writer
The Pennsylvania Convention Center Authority yesterday hired a pair of politically connected law firms to work on its impending $200 million bond issue. The firm of Ballard, Spahr, Andrews & Ingersoll will be the lead bond counsel for an undetermined fee. The firm was among Mayor Goode's largest campaign contributors at $25,000. Atkinson & Archie will be the minority bond counsel. Nolan Atkinson is Goode's personal attorney, and the firm contributed $7,000 to his campaign.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 7, 1990 | By Bill Kent, Special to the Daily News
On this September weekend every year, sofa spuds are sprawled in front of the tube ogling the Miss America pageant and maybe wondering what it would be like to roll down the Expressway, lumber into Convention Hall, and see America's most famous skin-and-dental-reconstruction show live. Hmmm, they may be thinking, maybe it's got all the thrills of a ballgame at the Vet - there you are in the bleachers in casual attire, hooting, hollering, stomping your feet with the organ's beat and maybe catching a fly ball.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 17, 2012 | By Jen A. Miller, For The Inquirer
ASBURY PARK, N.J. - This week the National Constitution Center premieres its exhibit dedicated to the Boss, "From Asbury Park to the Promised Land: The Life and Music of Bruce Springsteen," open through Sept. 3. But you can also take a weekend trip to see where it all began for Springsteen - in the actual Asbury Park, which is just a little over an hour's drive from Philadelphia. Springsteen's 1973 album Greetings From Asbury Park, N.J. is a classic that not only told the world about the Jersey Shore but also gave the city a slogan it still uses today, even though the album showcased the tribulations of people living in a then-depressed town.
BUSINESS
August 19, 1987 | By GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer
While Philadelphia's proposed Center City convention center sinks deeper into a morass of political finagling, Philadelphia's "other" convention hall is showing signs of improvement each month. The city-funded Civic Center's customary annual deficit shrunk to $764,000 during the fiscal year that ended June 30, the facility's first full year under professional management. The deficit in the previous fiscal year topped $1.4 million. Executives of Spectacor, the management company picked last year to operate the Civic Center and the Port of History Museum, say the deficit dwindled because revenue at the convention hall shot up at an unprecendented pace.
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