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Convention Hall

NEWS
November 11, 2004 | By Alan J. Heavens INQUIRER REAL ESTATE WRITER
If one man's trash is another's treasure, the interior of the soon-to-be razed Convention Hall at the Philadelphia Civic Center is yielding enough good stuff to fill Fort Knox. "It's the penultimate, the nirvana of architectural salvage," said Mark Foster, who has anted up half the labor costs to save as many of these gems from the landfill as possible. "It is laden with material that will never be produced again. " What kind of material? Joseph A. Weidle, executive vice president of Modern Construction Management, of Bensalem, who is supervising union workers at the site, doesn't hide his enthusiasm as he navigates the dimly lit halls of Convention Hall, pointing it all out: Dozens of chandeliers; leaded-glass windows; intricate brass radiator covers; fluted marble columns; and the end seats, scoreboards and maple floor of the auditorium where the Atlantic Ten played basketball and FDR was nominated for his second term as president in 1936.
NEWS
September 1, 2013 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writer
The addicts are coming! The addicts are coming! More than 17,000. In fact, they're already here! Narcotics Anonymous celebrates its 60th anniversary this weekend in Philadelphia. As prescription drug abuse reaches epidemic levels, especially among young people, the recovering addicts began arriving Thursday to celebrate their sobriety and show the public that drug habits can be kicked and former users can go on to lead productive and happy lives. "I've talked to a lot of people in convention services over the years who are a little nervous about all the drug addicts coming to town," said Rebecca Meyer, assistant executive director of Narcotics Anonymous.
SPORTS
February 9, 1989 | By Dick Jerardi, Daily News Sports Writer
The scoreboard at Convention Hall read La Salle 111, Visitors 91, the score of the Explorers' victory over American last Sunday. Banners detailing the accomplishments of all-time Explorers greats Tom Gola, Michael Brooks and Ken Durrett were hung at the top of the stands overlooking what will be midcourt. And when the doors from the room housing the press conference to announce La Salle's move from the Palestra to the Civic Center swung open to the sight of the new Explorers Room and the sounds of the La Salle band, all that was left for the move to be complete was the first home game next season.
NEWS
July 14, 1988 | By Edgar Williams, Inquirer Staff Writer
The man approached Howard Lanin with a fistful of currency and an offer to share the wealth. "In about an hour," the man said, "we'll be walking out. All you've got to do when I give you the signal is play 'Dixie,' and this is yours. " He thrust the bills at Lanin. Howard Lanin told the fellow to get lost. And so the famous Southern segregationist walkout from the 1948 Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia, which occurred 40 years ago today, took place without benefit of musical accompaniment.
NEWS
January 12, 2008 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In this nearly all-Victorian beach resort, some residents were shocked that plans for a $10 million beachfront convention center didn't include a fancy porch or even a single carved turret. But its designers had not looked that far into the past for inspiration. Instead, the two-story facility that is to open by 2010 will borrow elements from a convention center that was built in 1917 and then flattened by the great March storm of 1962. "I was surprised that when it was announced we would be replacing the existing Convention Hall, talk began to center among residents about the 1917 building," said Skip Loughlin, chairman of the Cape May City Historic Preservation Commission.
NEWS
November 5, 1998 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The sound that fills the cavernous hall on the Boardwalk is so large, so magnificent, so stirring that it would seem only the ocean a few steps away could surpass it in grandeur. Internet rumors to the contrary, the largest pipe organ in the world has not been walled up inside the old Convention Hall on the Boardwalk. Its eight pipe chambers have not been converted into meeting rooms. Its parts - both massive and intricate - have not been consumed by flood. Just ask the 8,000 screaming boxing fans who on Halloween night heard the organ played for only the second time this year, heralding the entrance of preening featherweight champion "Prince" Naseem Hamed in true Phantom of the Opera style.
NEWS
May 26, 1994 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
While two battalions of firefighters were quelling a fire that seared a section of the roof of the famous Convention Center and Visitors Bureau, their off-duty counterparts were across town to witness City Council's approval of a contract that raised their pay. The fire, according to officials, may have been started around 2 p.m. when sparks came in contact with roofing materials as welders were installing a new section of the circular peaked Convention...
NEWS
February 13, 2012 | By Anthony Campisi, Inquirer Staff Writer
The economy might not be doing well, but the tattoo industry is thriving. Just look at Austin Spencer. The 31-year-old tattoo artist from Las Vegas was at the Philadelphia Tattoo Arts Convention over the weekend, charging clients $150 an hour to emblazon his signature works on their bodies. Considering that each of his tattoos takes four or five hours to apply with an electric needle, Spencer was doing pretty well handling two clients each day. "Any form of making money off of illustration" is his goal, said the slim man with glasses, who began his career in high school, drawing tattoos for friends.
NEWS
August 31, 2004 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
The Republican National Convention's unscripted moments last night came from filmmaker Michael Moore, whose movie Fahrenheit 9/11 skewers President Bush and the war in Iraq. Moore, who is writing a convention column for USA Today, caused a minor stir when he tried to enter the convention hall as a member of the press. After some confusion over the credentials for his security guard, Moore was escorted to the press seats. Republican catcalls began to erupt in his direction.
NEWS
December 10, 1987 | By CYNTHIA BURTON, Daily News Staff Writer
The Pennsylvania Convention Center Authority yesterday hired a pair of politically connected law firms to work on its impending $200 million bond issue. The firm of Ballard, Spahr, Andrews & Ingersoll will be the lead bond counsel for an undetermined fee. The firm was among Mayor Goode's largest campaign contributors at $25,000. Atkinson & Archie will be the minority bond counsel. Nolan Atkinson is Goode's personal attorney, and the firm contributed $7,000 to his campaign.
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