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Conventional Wisdom

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NEWS
November 5, 2004 | By Larry Eichel INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
During every presidential campaign, a lot of assumptions, predictions and statements of alleged fact get made about what's happening among the public. Then the election itself comes along, and the American people set everybody straight. This year was no exception. In the weeks leading up to Nov. 2, academics and political strategists often opined that social issues, such as abortion and gay marriage, would be secondary concerns. Such issues matter most, they concluded, when the nation is not at war and when the economy is humming.
NEWS
March 13, 1986 | BY DAVID A. DORN
1. Which of the following convention centers make money for their respective cities? a. Las Vegas b. Chicago c. Washington d. None of the above 2. How many existing jobs and businesses will be forced to leave the Reading Terminal area? a. 3 businesses and 4.2 jobs b. 10 businesses and 100 jobs c. 50 businesses and 700 jobs d. 170 businesses and 1,700 jobs 3. What percentage of all conventions nationwide need a space bigger than our existing Convention Hall?
NEWS
February 4, 1991 | BY JACK MCKINNEY
Now that we have almost three weeks of war with Iraq behind us, wouldn't this be as good a time as any to declare a moratorium on the invocation of conventional wisdom? Allied commander Norman Schwarzkopf already has made it emphatically clear that he has no use for such dated war jargon as "carpet bombing" and "body counts. " A man who can break with the past as decisively as that doesn't figure to get hung up on conventional wisdom, either. Carpet bombing was something the Air Force started in World War II and carried on through Vietnam.
NEWS
November 5, 1992 | By Dick Polman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
They said it was a laugher. They were wrong. They said he was a goner. They were wrong. They said "character" was a killer. They were wrong. They said no one cared. Wrong again. This year the experts - those pundits and professional politicians whose opinions popped up over and over again - took a beating. This year, the old rules of political combat simply didn't apply. The 1992 presidential election produced three losers: George Bush, Ross Perot and conventional wisdom.
NEWS
May 23, 1988 | By David S. Broder
When "everybody" in the nation's capital agrees on something, it is prudent to be skeptical. Consider this column, then, as a skeptic's effort to subvert the latest conventional wisdom that the Democrats will certainly recapture the White House in November. The euphoria is based on the polls, which last week were speaking loud and clear. A Los Angeles Times survey showed Vice President Bush trailing his likely Democratic rival, Massachusetts Gov. Michael S. Dukakis, 52-36 percent in California, a state which has not gone Democratic since 1964.
NEWS
May 24, 1991 | By PETER BINZEN
Beware of the Conventional Wisdom. And yet we accept the Conventional Wisdom as though it were handed down on a tablet from on high. We would be wise to look closer. But that would be unconventional. To touch first on fun and baseball games, consider what the Conventional Wisdom says about 79-year-old Fenway Park, hallowed home of the Boston Red Sox. Intellectuals worship the place. Sports writers rhapsodize about it. They keep telling us that Fenway is the most noble, the most glorious venue in which to watch the national pastime.
NEWS
December 10, 1995 | By Joseph S. Kennedy, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
From 1828 to 1888, Hiram Corson practiced medicine from an office in rural Montgomery County, making house calls as a matter of routine and delivering about 3,000 babies. But his impact was also felt nationally in the medical community. And along with his work as a doctor, he was a leading liberal advocate on the pressing social issues of his day. "Dr. Corson was a progressive in both medicine and on controversial social issues," said Louis A. Meier, a Norristown surgeon and student of local medical history.
BUSINESS
January 28, 1986 | By FREDERICK H. LOWE, Daily News Staff Writer
Two years ago, F. Bartlett Moore, then general manager of the Bellevue Stratford, told a state Senate hearing that if a convention center weren't built soon in Philadelphia, his hotel might not be around to benefit from it. Moore, who has since left the Bellevue, was right. The Bellevue is scheduled to close indefinitely on Feb. 2, although there is speculation that the financially troubled hotel may reopen as a smaller luxury hotel, with condominiums, retail and office space.
NEWS
April 7, 1998 | By Leonard Pitts Jr
Case dismissed? After all these years, that's what it comes down to? Jones v. Clinton, the sexual harassment suit pitting Paula Jones against the President of the United States, is abruptly kaput, finito, sayonara? I'm surprised. More surprised than I've been in, well . . . a little over three weeks. That's how long it's been since a military jury acquitted Army Sgt. Maj. Gene McKinney on charges similar to those faced by the President. McKinney was accused of sexual misconduct based on allegations independently lodged by six women.
NEWS
June 15, 2001
Tonight's the final home game in a Sixers season to cherish. It's a season when a bunch of players became a team, and a proud region burst into a community. It's a season when fans around the country rallied to this crew of injured underdogs who don't quit. It's a season when those same fans celebrated an upset victory joyously, yet peaceably. So on this "casual Friday," folks from Camden to Kensington to Lancaster will be wearing their Sixers best: No. 3, No. 55 and others.
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NEWS
December 5, 2014
FOR THE PAST few years, the chart-tracking bookings at the city's huge Pennsylvania Convention Center has looked like a ski slope - with all the lines headed down. The $780 million expansion, completed in 2011, was supposed to bring more and bigger conventions to the city, in turn meaning more work for the city's 62,000 hospitality-sector employees. But a decade of labor strife had soured convention organizers on booking the facility. Philadelphia had a national reputation for being a hostile and costly venue.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 23, 2012 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
When the speech pathologist heard children in the Philadelphia classroom say what sounded like pin for the word pen , he recommended that they be treated for a hearing disability. University of Pennsylvania researcher William Labov, who was visiting the school that day in the 1970s, knew the real reason. The children were African American, and they simply spoke a different - but equally legitimate - form of English. For more than four decades, Labov has been challenging perceptions about the way people talk, upending long-held doctrines in the field of linguistics and taking those findings beyond academia to the real world.
NEWS
June 5, 2012 | By Jennifer Rubin
Since it became obvious in early March that Mitt Romney would be the Republican nominee, conventional wisdom had it that: 1) Romney was a weak candidate; 2) the Republicans would have a base problem; and 3) President Obama surely would win.   Over time, the first two prongs of conventional wisdom melted away. Romney delivered thoughtful speeches (at Liberty University), showed a readiness to duke it out (on his record at Bain Capital), and displayed deft aggressiveness (bringing up the Solyndra mess)
BUSINESS
April 25, 2012 | Scott Sturgis
2012 Scion iQ: "Dude, where's the rest of my car?" Price: Starts at $15,995. Marketer's pitch: "iQ therefore I am. " Conventional wisdom: "What the heck is that little thing?" Reality: A little smarter than a Smart. Smallness is big: As the owner of an old Volkswagen Beetle, I have an affinity for small cars, and am happy to see so many choices at this scale. But the new-for-2012 Scion iQ takes things to a new level.
BUSINESS
February 12, 2012 | By Reid Kanaley, Inquirer Columnist
Can you trust conventional wisdom, or your gut, in financial matters? Not always. And in some cases, perhaps never, according to the economists and other experts at these sites on money. Brain activity. Harvard economics professor David Laibson has used brain scans to explore how people's emotions affect their decision-making. One thing he has found is that financial miscues based on convention and emotion lead to widespread problems - and cost money. In particular, in this interview with money.cnn.com, he notes that many people make financial decisions, such as selling off stocks or buying gold, based on a recent trend that is unlikely to hold up over time.
BUSINESS
January 4, 2012 | By Scott Sturgis, For The Inquirer
2012 Mazda2 Touring: A little bit of fun. Just a little. Price: $16,820 as tested. ($15,855 base price. A Sport model can be had starting at $14,370.) Marketer's pitch: Maximum performance for minimalists. Conventional wisdom: Car and Driver 2011 Editor's Choice Award for small cars. Reality: If you want things simple and a little fun in an economy car, then it's '2 for you. European? When I started Driver's Seat almost a year ago, my first road test was a Ford Fiesta.
NEWS
December 16, 2011 | By Carl Golden
Conventional wisdom had it that Republican voters, donors, and leaders are desperately searching for an alternative to Mitt Romney as their presidential nominee, and that the current preprimary process is a hopeless, American Idol -like series of auditions to find another contender who fills the bill. The ascensions of Michele Bachmann, Rick Perry, and Herman Cain were manifestations of this quest for a candidacy with excitement and energy - qualities few ascribe to Romney.
NEWS
October 19, 2010 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
It's doubtful that any sentient Philadelphia Orchestra listener of the last seven years hasn't marveled at principal clarinetist Ricardo Morales - his nimble Ravel, cushiony arpeggios in a Mozart symphony, or his beguiling ability to float a Rachmaninoff melody over the ensemble without edging above a whisper. Classical music doesn't have an MVP, but it's clear that Morales, raised from the pit of the Metropolitan Opera by Wolfgang Sawallisch, is the best thing to happen to the orchestra in years.
SPORTS
June 22, 2010 | By PHIL JASNER, jasnerp@phillynews.com
As an agent, David Falk's stake in the 76ers includes a major chunk of the present (Elton Brand) and perhaps a star of the future (Evan Turner). We'll all know much more about Turner at the beginning of Thursday night's NBA draft, in which the Sixers hold the No. 2 pick. Conventional wisdom says the Sixers remain focused on Turner, the guard from Ohio State. The speculators would like you to believe there's a split in the organization, one side preferring Turner, another faction lobbying for 19-year-old Georgia Tech forward Derrick Favors.
SPORTS
May 20, 2010 | By DAVID MURPHY, dmurphy@phillynews.com
CONVENTIONAL wisdom among present-day statisticians has relegated the individual pitching victory to the hallway closet that also contains butter churns and Micro Machines and games of Simon. And, in many ways, Jamie Moyer's performance in the Phillies' 4-1 loss to the Cubs last night serves to further the argument against the importance of a starter's record. After all, if victories were doled out based strictly on merit, Moyer's seven-inning, two-run, seven-strikeout performance would earn him one. And the Phillies' offense, which went 1-for-10 with runners in scoring position and failed to capitalize on several key late-game situations, would earn itself a rare notch in the loss column.
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