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Conveyor Belt

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NEWS
September 13, 1990 | By John Ellis, Special to The Inquirer
A little over a year ago, Corson Lime Co. was thwarted in its effort to construct a conveyor belt over Joshua Road to carry 8,000 tons of stone a day at its quarry operation in Whitemarsh Township. Instead of getting angry or taking the matter to court, the company went back to the drawing board. On Tuesday night, the effort paid off when the Whitemarsh Planning Commission recommended that the township building inspector issue a permit for the conveyor belt which, in the new proposal, will go under Joshua Road instead of above it. The vote was 4-0. Commission members Stacey Schwartz, J. Barry Harris and Fred R. Levin were absent.
NEWS
July 16, 1989 | By Peter J. Shelly, Special to The Inquirer
James Chupella, president of the Corson Lime Co. in Whitemarsh Township, says he could not agree more with residents who want to see drastic changes in the way one of the nation's oldest lime quarries operates. The noise, the clouds of dust, and the 85-ton trucks that have rolled across Joshua Road all day long for decades and the rundown condition of the plant make for what he calls an "environmentally unacceptable" situation. The company's new owner - the Scottish Heritable Co. - wants to solve all those problems, Chupella said.
NEWS
February 9, 2002 | By Seth Borenstein INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Buzz Aldrin, the second man on the moon, will ask NASA on Monday to consider sending astronauts to Mars using a cosmic version of a conveyor belt. Aldrin wants to launch what he calls a "space hotel" into a continuous loop around the sun. It would ferry astronauts from Earth to Mars every six to nine months. Astronauts would use a "space taxi" to enter and exit the hotel, which would shuttle endlessly between the two planets at 12,000 m.p.h. The trips from Earth to the hotel, or Mars to the hotel, would take one day, Aldrin told the Inquirer Washington Bureau.
NEWS
July 27, 1989 | By Peter J. Shelly, Special to The Inquirer
A standing-room-only crowd of close to 100 was on hand to applaud the Whitemarsh Planning Commission's decision to recommend disapproval of the Corson Lime Co.'s request to construct a conveyor belt across Joshua Road. At Tuesday night's meeting, the commission voted, 5-0, to reject Corson's application for a building and zoning permit for a conveyor belt that would carry 8,000 tons of stone a day from the quarry across Joshua Road to the company's processing plant. Commission members Ruth Buescher and Stacey Schwartz were not at the meeting.
NEWS
June 28, 2003 | By Tom Belden and Reid Kanaley INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Most US Airways passengers made their flights from Philadelphia International Airport yesterday - but not all their checked luggage did. The breakdown of a conveyor belt Wednesday night in US Airways' automated baggage-sorting system has caused massive delays in getting tens of thousands of bags to their destinations, the airline said. The malfunction, affecting only domestic flights, created a congested, chaotic scene at US Airways check-in counters in the airport's B-C Terminal.
BUSINESS
November 9, 2006 | By Tom Belden INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A baggage conveyor belt in Philadelphia International Airport's A-West Terminal has broken down six times in the last week, delaying about two dozen overseas flights and forcing some to leave without all the passengers' luggage, US Airways and airport officials said yesterday. The belt, which carries outbound bags from US Airways' international check-in counters to a ground-level sorting area, has stopped working for periods of a few minutes to more than four hours since last Thursday, city Aviation Director Charles J. Isdell said.
BUSINESS
March 12, 1997 | By Tom Belden, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For any long-suffering US Airways passengers who may have waited an hour or more to retrieve checked luggage at Philadelphia International Airport, relief is on the way. Philadelphia's dominant airline expects to flip the switch tomorrow on two new baggage carousels designed to deliver luggage into waiting passengers' hands faster than the dilapidated, 20-year-old facilities now in use. The $32 million system can handle 40 percent more bags...
NEWS
April 14, 1986 | By Laurie Merrill, Special to The Inquirer
The right arm of a 42-year-old man was severed near his elbow Friday while he was working on a conveyor belt used to move sludge through the Ambler Waste Water Treatment Plant at Church and Main Streets. Thomas Futch Sr., 42, of the first block of Franklin Street, Lambertville, N.J., was taken to Abington Memorial Hospital by Ambler Ambulance following the accident. Futch was listed in stable condition yesterday. Dr. Mark Nissenbaum, chief of orthopedic hand and microsurgery at Abington Memorial Hospital, performed surgery to clean and close the wound.
NEWS
August 30, 1990 | By John Ellis, Special to The Inquirer
It was 13 months ago last Saturday that 100 residents showed up at the Whitemarsh Township Building to protest a Corson Lime Co. proposal to install a conveyor belt over Joshua Road to carry 8,000 tons of stone a day. The company had gone to the township's Planning Commission to seek a recommendation for a building and zoning permit, which is officially issued by the building inspector. But in the face of angry residents and plagued by its own questions and concerns, the commission recommended that the permit be denied.
NEWS
January 28, 2004 | By Sam Wood INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A mechanic at a Cumberland County seafood-processing plant was in critical condition last night after both his arms were ripped from his body by a piece of machinery, authorities said. John W. Lackey, 26, of Bridgeton, had been defrosting a piece of heavy equipment at Surfside Products on Monday morning when he backed into the gear box of a conveyor belt, said Trooper Jaime Ablett of the New Jersey State Police. The belt started up suddenly, and Lackey's work jacket became caught in the gears.
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NEWS
January 7, 2016 | By David O'Reilly, Staff Writer
Where do you suppose that Champagne bottle is you uncorked on New Year's Eve? And whatever did you do with the cork? The molded Styrofoam that delivered your new laptop, the cardboard cup from Starbucks that held this morning's latte, the Sunday Inquirer, Friday's pizza box greasy with pepperoni, the aluminum foil that wrapped the turkey, and that string of Christmas lights that blinked out over the weekend: Where are they now? If you live in Burlington County, chances are good that your recent paper, metal, plastic and glass trail has been dumped, tumbled, crushed, and flattened, scanned by infrared light, puffed by air jets, and sorted by magnets at a plant in Westampton.
FOOD
December 25, 2015 | By Drew Lazor, For The Inquirer
I didn't tell the friendly guy in the blue-and-yellow polo shirt what I was planning to do, but that didn't matter. He already knew. The cashier, an employee of a certain Swedish purveyor of stylish-yet-affordable home furnishings, took one look at the items I'd placed on his conveyor belt - six glass bottles with stopper tops - and perked up. "Nice. You making coquito?" He was dead-on. Right now, as we bear down on Christmas, we're in the thick of peak coquito season, when Puerto Ricans swarm their kitchens to blend up big batches of their island's answer to eggnog.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 2015 | By Michael Harrington, Inquirer Staff Writer
Big dogs have big hearts. Based on Norman Bridwell's classic 1963 book and the subsequent TV show, the exhibit Adventures with Clifford the Big Red Dog at the Please Touch Museum celebrates the colossal canine. Clifford started out as the runt of the litter, but the copious love of his owner Emily Elizabeth caused him to grow to 25 feet. He tries to be helpful and friendly, but his size can sometimes be a difficulty. One can see why small fry find him appealing. The interactive exhibit, opening Saturday, illustrates Clifford's 10 Big Ideas (they come with a lifetime guarantee)
ENTERTAINMENT
May 7, 2015
IN "THE D TRAIN," Jack Black is Keyser Soze. He's the psychologist who treats a kid who sees dead people, then realizes he's dead. He's the guy in "The Crying Game" whose girlfriend has an Adam's apple. He is, in short, a guy at the center of a jaw-dropping plot turn. Should this plot point be revealed? In the case of "The D Train," opening Friday, it's a divisive question. Some critics are doing it, some aren't. So, we put it to the highest authority we could think of - Jack Black, who stars in "The D Train," and who produced it. "Its tricky!"
BUSINESS
February 6, 2015 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
So, where does your checked bag go after you drop it at the airline ticket counter? Like many passengers, bags may have a quarter-mile journey from the ticketing lobby to the aircraft. The Transportation Security Administration (TSA) Wednesday offered a rare glimpse behind the scenes at how baggage is screened at Philadelphia International Airport, where an in-line system of conveyor belts and explosive-detection machines can process up to 1,000 bags an hour. "Some people think the TSA opens and physically screens every single bag," said TSA spokesman Michael McCarthy.
NEWS
September 1, 2014 | By Carolyn Davis, Inquirer Staff Writer
It was the messiest of political situations, a real schmear campaign in which the Jenkintown mayor stood to make a lot of dough. Literally. If you went past the window of Fill A Bagel one morning this month, you might have seen Jenkintown Mayor Ed Foley wearing a white chef's hat and apron while making tie-dye-colored bagels to promote the forthcoming Jenkintown arts festival. After kneading, he walked to a machine with a small conveyor belt that forms the dough into circles.
SPORTS
October 21, 2013 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Columnist
Last week I traveled to Magee Rehabilitation Hospital, where a cousin was recuperating from a brain aneurysm. Before seeing her, I needed to drop off an equally sick computer at The Inquirer. Walking down Cherry Street, I turned left on Broad and headed north. It wasn't until I stood virtually beneath the iconic white tower that I remembered The Inquirer didn't live there anymore. And my cousin was the one with the brain trauma. Memories die slowly and painfully. Take the World Series.
NEWS
July 3, 2013 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
What's an airline baggage handler supposed to do when a passenger's luggage falls off the conveyor belt, pops open, and spews forth an untidy trail of socks, pajamas, and shampoo? The answer, customer service baggage handler Bosco F. Sylvince, 47, of Willingboro, says in a lawsuit filed last week, is to grab the contents, stuff them back into the suitcase, fasten the clasps, and send the bag on its way. That's company policy, and that's what Sylvince says he did on July 12, 2010, while working for United Airlines at Newark Airport.
SPORTS
March 5, 2010 | By Kate Fagan INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As if on a conveyor belt, games keep coming at the 76ers. Monday night they played the Orlando Magic, Wednesday night the Atlanta Hawks, and tonight they face the Boston Celtics. Since returning from the all-star break on Feb. 16, the opponents have been superior and the Sixers' play - especially on defense - has been inferior. Heading into the game at the Wachovia Center, the Sixers have lost seven of their last nine games; in those seven losses, they have trailed by at least 22 points six times, and in those nine games, they have allowed at least 100 points seven times.
BUSINESS
November 9, 2006 | By Tom Belden INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A baggage conveyor belt in Philadelphia International Airport's A-West Terminal has broken down six times in the last week, delaying about two dozen overseas flights and forcing some to leave without all the passengers' luggage, US Airways and airport officials said yesterday. The belt, which carries outbound bags from US Airways' international check-in counters to a ground-level sorting area, has stopped working for periods of a few minutes to more than four hours since last Thursday, city Aviation Director Charles J. Isdell said.
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