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NEWS
October 26, 2012
MY MOTHER has passed on now, but my memory of her homemade poundcake - a buttery almond-scented confection with a thick golden-brown crust and fluffy yellow center - is as alive as ever. She would bake it in a 1970s-era autumn-gold oven, and the rich smell would waft through the entire house. It was the only homemade cake I ever knew her to make, and she considered the recipe hers, even though she'd gotten it from a friend. It's written down in a dusty old recipe book in my loopy fourth-grade script.
NEWS
December 14, 1989 | By Denise-Marie Santiago, Inquirer Staff Writer
A prison inmate who wrote a 583-page cookbook while serving a life sentence for murder is suing a Montgomery County man who he says promised to help publish it. Bernard Jerry-El, 43, now at the State Correctional Institution at Pittsburgh, filed the lawsuit against Edward J. Reilly of Devon, who he says took the original copy of his cookbook in 1987 to photocopy and send to publishers. But Reilly lied about his connections with publishers and never returned the cookbook, according to Jerry-El's lawsuit, filed Tuesday in Montgomery County Court.
NEWS
January 7, 1990 | By Robert F. O'Neill, Special to The Inquirer
A $3 million civil suit involving a convicted murderer and a missing cookbook has been transferred to Delaware County Court because the defendant, Edward J. Reilly of Devon, lives here. Bernard Jerry-El, 43, an inmate at the State Correctional Institution in Pittsburgh, filed the lawsuit in Montgomery County on Dec. 12 because he was incarcerated at Graterford Prison at the time. The suit contends that Reilly took a 583-page cookbook written by Jerry-El with the understanding that he would help get it published, then either lost or stole the material.
NEWS
February 8, 2002 | By Louise Harbach INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
For every feast day commemorating the life of a Roman Catholic saint, there is likely to be a special dish to celebrate the occasion. That is what Lorraine Kiefer and the other members of Nativity Friends, a group of cooking enthusiasts at the Church of Nativity in Franklinville, discovered while researching the lives of saints for a cookbook they produced, Nativity Cooks Throughout the Year. In the 250-page book of nearly 700 recipes are those associated with better-known feast days, such as St. Patrick and St. Joseph, as well as lesser-known saints, such as Barbara and Catherine, both early Christian martyrs.
FOOD
January 22, 1992 | by Maria Gallagher, Daily News Staff Writer
The last time the National Football League produced a cookbook - in 1981 - the result was a homespun paperback with recipes like Mrs. Bart Starr's Coconut Buttermilk Cake and Ray Malavasi's Lasagna. This year, the NFL tapped top chefs in each NFL city to provide the recipes for "The NFL Cities' Cafe," which is more likely to appeal to readers of Gourmet magazine than Sports Illustrated. Recipes include Wild Mushroom Strudel, Alligator Piccata with Orange Sauce, Calamari Tacos, Duck Tamales with Cilantro Beurre Blanc and Pan-Crisped Lobster and Semolina Cakes with Caviar and Mascarpone.
NEWS
July 12, 2012
Marion Cunningham, 90, the home-cooking champion whose legacy can be found in the food-spattered pages of Fannie Farmer cookbooks in kitchens across America, died of complications from Alzheimer's disease at a hospital in Walnut Creek, Calif., on Wednesday, a family friend told the San Francisco Chronicle. Best known for her revisions of the classic The Fannie Farmer Cookbook, in 1979 and again in 1990, Ms. Cunningham also wrote several other books, including The Breakfast Book, Cooking With Children, and Lost Recipes.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 2008 | By BILL WARD, Star Tribune (Minneapolis)
Everybody loves Italian food, and this year it seemed as though most cookbook authors felt they owned a piece of it. Three of 2007's finest works on cucina Italiana bore near-identical titles: "[Given name]'s Italy. " 'Nuff said, clearly, especially since each of these works successfully captures the peninsula and its people as aptly as the zabaglione and zuppa di pesce. Lidia Bastianich, the engaging if slightly imperious TV host (check out her daughter Tanya's "not again, Mom" takes on their PBS shows; classic stuff)
FOOD
April 7, 2011 | By Gene Johnson, Associated Press
SEATTLE - Nathan Myhrvold didn't just go to school; he worked on the quantum theory of gravity with Stephen Hawking. He didn't just get a job; he became Microsoft's first chief technology officer. As a hobbyist, he didn't just get into grilling; he copped several top prizes in the World Championship of Barbecue. So it's unsurprising that when Myhrvold decided to write a cookbook, he didn't just write a cookbook. He outfitted his kitchen laboratory in Bellevue, Wash., with hundreds of thousands of dollars' worth of whiz-bang equipment, including a centrifuge, freeze-driers, humidity-controlled smokers, and special evaporators.
NEWS
May 1, 2000 | By Nita Lelyveld, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The recipes might best be described as suburban potluck international - noodles Romanoff, Oriental shrimp, taco dip, Spanish rice. The cover is red-and-white checked, a la Betty Crocker. Even the spiral-bound paperback format is wholesomely familiar, the kind used for Junior League and church fund-raisers across America. But a slim cookbook now on sale ($19.95) on the Internet and at a handful of left-leaning bookstores in Minnesota and California has an unusual, subversive twist.
FOOD
June 24, 2016
The Garden State, translated to the plate What does New Jersey taste like? Author John Holl attempts to answer that question in 150 recipes, in the new book Dishing Up New Jersey (Storey, May 2016). Local contributions include a recipe for honey-thyme caramels from Haddon Township's Mecha Artisan Chocolate and ancho and ale chili from the Blue Rose Inn in Cape May. - Samantha Melamed Dishing Up New Jersey, $19.95, at the Cook Book Stall at Reading Terminal Market, 12th and Arch Streets, Philadelphia, 267-237-8986, thecookbookstall.com Pastry perfection Combine the goodness of a Jewish bakery with the skill of a trained pastry chef and you have Tova du Plessis' new Essen Bakery in South Philadelphia.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
FOOD
September 16, 2016
Get it while its hot Cafe Lift, the Callowhill brunch spot, is known among regulars for its super-spicy Fiery Carter Sauce. Stop in for Sunday brunch and pick up a jar of the limited-run hot sauce to keep you going through the week. - Samantha Melamed Carter Sauce, $10 for a 16-ounce jar at Cafe Lift, 428 N. 13th St., 215-922-3031, cafelift.com Nourish with dessert Genevieve Ko's new Better Baking (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt) offers the promise that you can treat your family and friends to homemade desserts - and nourish them at the same time.
NEWS
July 22, 2016 | By Kathy Boccella, Staff Writer
Ken Bookman, 67, of Bala Cynwyd, a journalist who turned a passion for cooking into a successful career as a food editor and cookbook writer, died Sunday, July 17, at his home after a long struggle with uveal melanoma, a cancer of the eye. Mr. Bookman, known to colleagues for his razor-sharp wit as much as his finely honed culinary skills, was food editor at the Inquirer at a time when newspapers started covering restaurants and cooking as seriously as...
FOOD
May 20, 2016
Cook from the Boardwalk and beyond Fast-forward from spring to summer with The Jersey Shore Cookbook , a compendium of dishes - like blueberry scones and spaghetti and crabs - from beloved fine-dining restaurants, seafood shacks, and pancake houses from Cape May to Asbury Park. With tempting photos and chef profiles, the collection by Jersey food blogger Deborah Smith is a Shore dining guide and cookbook in one. - Samantha Melamed The Jersey Shore Cookbook by Deborah Smith, Quirk Books, $22.95 Botanical bowls for summer For dining on the deck or by the pool, these lovely serving dishes look amazingly close to porcelain, yet are made of melamine, and thus are lightweight, shatter-resistant, and dishwasher safe.
FOOD
May 20, 2016 | By Samantha Melamed, Staff Writer
On Christmas Eve 2013, Elisa Costantini lost her husband of 55 years. Her life more or less stopped. After more than six decades of cooking the ravioli, ragu, and risotto of her native Abruzzo for family, friends, and strangers, she barely had energy to make mac-and-cheese. "All I did was sleep. There was no way to go on. See, my husband and I, we were kids when we got married," said Costantini, 77, a petite woman with a thick accent and a helmet of brown hair. She'd been in love with her husband since he rode into her village on a motorcycle.
FOOD
February 12, 2016 | By J. Gardner, For The Inquirer
When my husband and I got married, among the wedding gifts we received from a family friend were signed editions of every cookbook issued by celebrated chef Yotam Ottolenghi. Our friend lives in London, and she was excited to share Ottolenghi's delicious recipes with us because she had enjoyed his cooking with her husband. In our nearly two years of marriage, I have loved sifting through the gorgeous pictures in Ottolenghi's cookbooks, planning elaborate meals that seem always to call for a sprinkling of lovely pomegranate seeds atop some masterpiece of eggplant, lamb, or fennel.
NEWS
December 18, 2015
I AM VERY RARELY recognized in public, and when it happens, I'm usually mistaken for someone else. Sarah Palin tops the list; since 2008 I've been approached with "Has anyone ever told you how much you look like" so many times that now I just smile and say "you betcha, everyone except Todd. " So the other day, when a gentleman named Sonny stopped me in the aisle at Barnes and Noble and said "Hey TV lady," I smiled and waited for the usual "you need to cut your hair 'cause I can't pay attention to what you're saying, and by the way, stop waving your hands so much.
FOOD
December 18, 2015 | By Staff Writers
Give a cook a cookbook and you may reap the benefits forevermore. Our staff selection of the year's best includes books with challenging cooking projects and simple weekday suppers, from croissants to slow-braised lamb shoulder, to homemade apple cider vinegar - something for every cook on your list. The Food Lab By J. Kenji López-Alt, Norton, 960 pp. $49.95 Every so often, a big book comes along that changes the way we think about cooking and introduces a new star.
NEWS
October 25, 2015 | By Dawn Fallik, For The Inquirer
Food writer Ruth Reichl's cookbook My Kitchen Year: 136 Recipes That Saved My Life takes readers on a culinary roller coaster, from the lowbrow world of peanut butter and jelly sandwiches (mmmm, heated), into the heavens of creamed lobster claws on toasted brioche. It's an emotional as well as culinary trip. She brings her book Tuesday to the Free Library. The former New York Times restaurant critic and editor of Gourmet magazine said writing the cookbook was comfort food, literally and emotionally.
NEWS
October 23, 2015
In America, the desire to eat well should not be a cost-prohibitive pursuit. That's the credo that food writer Leanne Brown was working with when developing her latest book, a grad-school assignment turned fast-moving phenomenon aimed at democratizing access to healthy and affordable food. What started as a PDF-only student project offered online for free has evolved into Good and Cheap: Eat Well on $4/Day (Workman Publishing), a New York Times best-seller with a straightforward mission: teaching people how to feed themselves, and their families, on very little money.
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