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NEWS
March 15, 2013 | BY BETH D'ADDONO, For the Daily News
I'M VERY ATTACHED to my paella pan. A gift from my friend Max Baez Berg, a seasoned maitre d'-about-town with a Spanish accent as thick as a well-made romesco sauce, the pan is a thing of beauty. Well-balanced and slightly off-round, it barely fits in my oven, but never mind. When I present the traditional Spanish rice dish in the pot for which it was intended, the oohs and aahs make my day. This pan joins a cadre of other ethnic specialty tools in my cabinets, cookware designed to do specific jobs and do them well.
FOOD
June 5, 1991 | By Marilynn Marter, Inquirer Food Writer
June is a time of weddings and graduations, a time when new couples and graduates are likely to be stocking their first kitchens. It's a time, too, when families and friends are looking for gifts for those new kitchens. To aid in that process, we talk today of equipping a basic kitchen on both limited and unlimited budgets. An economy kitchen can be stocked nicely for less than $200 by shopping at discount stores. A lot less than that if you find sales, perhaps a treasure or two at a flea market, or garner a few spare items from the family kitchen.
NEWS
January 26, 1999 | By Mary Blakinger, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Fante's, the 93-year-old cookware store founded in the Italian Market, yesterday announced that it would close two of its four stores at month's end. Nick Giovannucci, chief executive officer, said family members had decided to shutter the stores at Springfield Mall in Delaware County and in Exton because of the time they required and because of shrinking profit margins in the face of competition from large chain stores. Giovannucci oversees operations with his sister, Mariella Giovannucci-Esposito, Fante's president.
FOOD
June 10, 2010
Seasoned in the foundry Lodge Cast Iron started making cookware in Tennessee in 1896, and in 2002 reset the industry standard by seasoning its cookware with kosher-certified vegetable oil baked at a high temperature to give the pans a beautiful black patina. This 10 1/4-inch skillet even has a glass cover.   Gelato, sandwich style Embrace summer with ice cream-style sandwiches at Capogiro Gelato Cafe. Flavors are made fresh each morning, so the offerings vary, but some favorites are chocolate cookies with hazelnut gelato; ginger cookies with dulce de leche; and sugar cookies with strawberries and cream.
FOOD
December 27, 2007
Toast the New Year or other memorable occasion with a floral flourish - a wild hibiscus blooming in the bubbles. Set a syrupy crimson blossom at the bottom of each flute, top with champagne, and sip away. As a bonus, these Aussie imports are not only beautiful, they're edible, with a delightful raspberry-rhubarb flavor. Wild Hibiscus Flowers in Syrup, 8.8 ounces (11 flowers), about $12. At Williams-Sonoma nationwide, select mid-Atlantic Whole Foods markets, or www.wildhibiscus.
FOOD
April 7, 1993 | By Kim Pierce, FOR THE INQUIRER
To some people, a pan's a pan: As long as it heats without torching the house, it's good enough. At the opposite extreme are cooks who fawn over copper or aluminum pots as though they were Monets. Most of us fall somewhere between: We've seen the cheap stuff burn food, but aren't sure what makes Calphalon different from Le Crueset. Both sound very expensive. "People become intimidated," says Louise Houser, manager of the Plate and Platter, a kitchenware shop in Dallas.
NEWS
April 27, 1991 | by Jim Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
Federal authorities have quietly dropped all drug trafficking charges against Daniele Giovannucci, the former Philadelphia cookware dealer arrested last year for allegedly trying to buy a ton of marijuana from an informant. The charges were dropped "in the interest of justice" was all Assistant U.S. Attorney Louis Pichini, chief of the criminal division, and his boss, Michael M. Baylson, would say yesterday. Baylson said the investigation is continuing. Asked if there was any allegation of government misconduct in the investigation, both Baylson and Pichini declined comment.
FOOD
November 26, 2009
Pretty drained Tramontina's line of aluminum cookware now includes this six-quart stockpot with a stainless-steel lock-and-drain insert that allows easy draining, for perfectly cooked pasta. Glass lid is heat- and shatter-resistant; stainless-steel and silicone handles provide safe pickup of hot dishes; nonstick coating inside; porcelain enamel outside. Tasty surprise At first glance, you know this is candy, but what kind? These are chocolate-covered sunflower seeds, and they are irresistible.
FOOD
December 3, 1997 | by LindaCarol Cherken, For the Daily News
Once upon a time, buying a set of cookware was as easy as one, two, three. One roaster, two frying pans and three pots - small, medium and large - made your kitchen complete. Today, just one pot could cost a week's groceries, so your pocketbook demands you make the right choices. Though the prices can be shocking and the choices endless, the good news is that new lines of kitchen cookware are long-lasting and much easier to clean than their predecessors. Buying a pot is almost as personal as buying a hairbrush.
FOOD
February 22, 1989 | By Sonja Heinze, Special to the Daily News
Q. I've heard that Teflon and other non-stick cookware let off highly toxic fumes when heated during normal use and that the deaths of household pets, especially birds, have been linked to this. I've also heard that the fumes are potentially dangerous to people, especially small children. I'm very concerned because all my cookware is SilverStone and I have a baby. Do you have any information concerning this? - Caryl Edwards Dania, Fla. A. In normal use, toxic fumes are not emitted from non-stick coated cookware.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
FOOD
February 13, 2015 | By Elisa Ludwig, For The Inquirer
Your favorite pan in the kitchen, the one that delivers the best results time and again, inspires a special kind of love. A love that can't be tempered by rust nor by achy arm muscles. This is an ode to the cast-iron skillet. No one remembers purchasing his first cast-iron skillet, as Ellen Brown points out in her well-researched The New Cast Iron Skillet Cookbook (Sterling Epicure). Like umbrellas, they come into our lives full of functional possibility, often well-used, patiently waiting at the ready for us to discover their indispensable place in the kitchen.
NEWS
March 15, 2013 | BY BETH D'ADDONO, For the Daily News
I'M VERY ATTACHED to my paella pan. A gift from my friend Max Baez Berg, a seasoned maitre d'-about-town with a Spanish accent as thick as a well-made romesco sauce, the pan is a thing of beauty. Well-balanced and slightly off-round, it barely fits in my oven, but never mind. When I present the traditional Spanish rice dish in the pot for which it was intended, the oohs and aahs make my day. This pan joins a cadre of other ethnic specialty tools in my cabinets, cookware designed to do specific jobs and do them well.
NEWS
November 26, 2011 | By Maria Panaritis, Jan Hefler, and Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writers
Overnight shoppers were still prowling around in pajamas when Diane Blasek-Kehoe arrived at King of Prussia mall about 10 a.m. But where she planted herself first - the cookware department at J.C. Penney - said a lot about the forces that coaxed retailers to open earlier than ever, and shoppers to venture out at midnight for extreme Black Friday sales. She and others in one of the store's longer checkout lines were not holding designer-brand appliances. They instead held boxes labeled COOKS and JCP, low-cost brands owned and heavily promoted by J.C. Penney itself and, therefore, cheaper than brand-name competition.
NEWS
November 25, 2011 | By Maria Panaritis,Jan Hefler and Susan Snyder, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Overnight shoppers were still prowling around in pajamas when Diane Blasek-Kehoe arrived at King of Prussia Mall around 10 a.m. But where she planted herself first - the cookware department at J.C. Penney - said a lot about the forces that coaxed retailers to open earlier than ever, and shoppers to venture out at midnight for extreme Black Friday sales. She and others in one of the store's longer checkout lines were not holding designer-brand appliances. They instead held boxes labeled COOKS and JCP, low-cost brands owned and heavily promoted by J.C. Penney itself and, therefore, cheaper than brand-name competition.
FOOD
June 10, 2010
Seasoned in the foundry Lodge Cast Iron started making cookware in Tennessee in 1896, and in 2002 reset the industry standard by seasoning its cookware with kosher-certified vegetable oil baked at a high temperature to give the pans a beautiful black patina. This 10 1/4-inch skillet even has a glass cover.   Gelato, sandwich style Embrace summer with ice cream-style sandwiches at Capogiro Gelato Cafe. Flavors are made fresh each morning, so the offerings vary, but some favorites are chocolate cookies with hazelnut gelato; ginger cookies with dulce de leche; and sugar cookies with strawberries and cream.
FOOD
November 26, 2009
Pretty drained Tramontina's line of aluminum cookware now includes this six-quart stockpot with a stainless-steel lock-and-drain insert that allows easy draining, for perfectly cooked pasta. Glass lid is heat- and shatter-resistant; stainless-steel and silicone handles provide safe pickup of hot dishes; nonstick coating inside; porcelain enamel outside. Tasty surprise At first glance, you know this is candy, but what kind? These are chocolate-covered sunflower seeds, and they are irresistible.
FOOD
December 27, 2007
Toast the New Year or other memorable occasion with a floral flourish - a wild hibiscus blooming in the bubbles. Set a syrupy crimson blossom at the bottom of each flute, top with champagne, and sip away. As a bonus, these Aussie imports are not only beautiful, they're edible, with a delightful raspberry-rhubarb flavor. Wild Hibiscus Flowers in Syrup, 8.8 ounces (11 flowers), about $12. At Williams-Sonoma nationwide, select mid-Atlantic Whole Foods markets, or www.wildhibiscus.
FOOD
December 6, 2007
For those on your list who like to cook, entertain, or just eat, we've picked some of our favorite new and old reliable products as gift ideas. Prices are suggested retail. More gift ideas on Page 3. Nutcracker sweets A novel take on truffles for the holidays from Portland, Ore.-based Moonstruck Chocolate Co. lets you nibble your way through the classic Christmas tale bound inside a book box with nutcracker, snowman, tree, snowball and other truffle confections. Winning pitcher The organic Francisco design of this handmade pottery pitcher from Portugal blends rustic and contemporary in a way that echoes the casual style of a country farmhouse.
NEWS
June 23, 2006 | By Gayle Ronan Sims INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Jeanne Bossone Fante, 96, who guided a small family-owned store in Philadelphia's Italian Market to a national reputation, died of heart failure Tuesday at White Horse Village in Newtown Square, where she had lived for three months. She had been a longtime resident of South Philadelphia. Jeanne Bossone grew up amid the sights, smells and sounds of the Italian Market and graduated from South Philadelphia High School in 1928. In 1934, the blond, green-eyed beauty married Frank Fante, who along with brothers Domenic and Luis ran Fante's - a modest home-furnishings store established in 1906 by their father, Luigi Sr., and his brother Camillo.
NEWS
January 26, 1999 | By Mary Blakinger, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Fante's, the 93-year-old cookware store founded in the Italian Market, yesterday announced that it would close two of its four stores at month's end. Nick Giovannucci, chief executive officer, said family members had decided to shutter the stores at Springfield Mall in Delaware County and in Exton because of the time they required and because of shrinking profit margins in the face of competition from large chain stores. Giovannucci oversees operations with his sister, Mariella Giovannucci-Esposito, Fante's president.
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