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SPORTS
September 25, 1997 | by Ted Taylor, For the Daily News
Rube Oldring played in the major leagues from 1905 to 1918, almost entirely for the Philadelphia Athletics. An outfielder, he had a lifetime batting average of .270, with highs of .308 in 1910 and .301 in 1912. He played in three World Series for the A's. He died in 1961 at the age of 77 in the town where he spent most of his life, Bridgeton, N.J. For the last three decades, Rube Oldring Jr., now 70, has tried, without success, to get Bridgeton - long a semipro baseball hot spot in Cumberland County - to honor his father.
SPORTS
October 26, 1995 | by Ted Taylor, Special to the Daily News
A self-imposed exile from Cooperstown, N.Y., ended on a recent fall weekend when I made the four-plus hour drive to baseball's hallowed Hall of Fame. When I left the quaint little New York hamlet, I did so with a renewed enthusiasm for baseball, but also with a few unanswered questions. Why the exile? Well, several years ago I was involved in a crusade to get Richie Ashburn inducted into the Hall of Fame and those efforts were, at the time, met by total indifference from the folks in Cooperstown.
NEWS
January 11, 1995
Sometimes, nice guys finish fourth - and it's more than enough. Receiving 96.52 percent of the vote, the fourth-highest mark ever, Mike Schmidt was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame on Monday. The names of the only three players to top him - Ty Cobb, Tom Seaver and Hank Aaron - show what kind of legendary company the Phillies' great slugger now rightfully keeps. The man that Phils' announcer Harry Kalas loved to call Michael Jack was a thoughtful recipient of the honor.
NEWS
March 9, 1995
He defined Whiz Kid - legging out hits, swiping bases, catching uncatchable flyballs. The Phils' Richie Ashburn always looked "runnerish," to use one of his favorite terms. Now, he'll look just fine frozen in bronze on a plaque in Cooperstown. "Hard to believe," is another of Mr. Ashburn's stock lines and it's hard to believe it took so long for him to be elected to baseball's Hall of Fame, an injustice rectified Tuesday. Younger fans know "Whitey" Ashburn as the Phils' genial and knowledgeable announcer (a job he assumed in 1963)
SPORTS
June 20, 1997 | By Jim Salisbury, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Pete Rose returned to Philadelphia last night and began a press conference by ranting against the tiny dimensions of some American League parks and boasting that he'd hit 600 homers if he was breaking into the game today. Then the filibuster ended. Rose looked out into the assembled media horde and issued a challenge: "If anyone here would vote against me going into the Hall of Fame, I want them to stand up and tell me why," he said. No one moved, possibly out of fear of catching one of Rose's gaudy cowboy boots - inscribed with the No. 14 - in the backside.
SPORTS
April 11, 1993 | By Jayson Stark, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
He has been baseball's most upstanding citizen, a back-to-back MVP and one of the most popular players of the last 15 years. But when the Phillies sent Dale Murphy packing off to Colorado last week, it made a lot of people ponder the momentous question: Is this man a Hall of Famer? Had Murphy just strung together a couple more years like his 18-homer, 81- RBI season with the Phillies in 1991, there wouldn't be any doubt. But now, as he winds down his great career as a 37-year-old pinch-hitter for the Rockies, it is a question with no easy answers.
NEWS
August 29, 1993 | By Mike Shoup, INQUIRER TRAVEL EDITOR
Contrary to popular belief, and with apologies to the late, great Abner Doubleday, the national pastime did not begin in a cow pasture here. Nor did Mr. Doubleday invent the game. But this small, picturesque lakeside town has become its shrine nevertheless - the mecca for more than a quarter-million fans each year. Cooperstown, as any baseball fanatic knows, is home to the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum - at once a most likely and unlikely location for a museum dedicated to such a popular and culturally ingrained sport.
SPORTS
December 18, 2015 | By Sam Donnellon, Daily News Columnist
'IT'S HIM again, Commissioner Manfred. " "Him who?" "Pete Rose. On line one. " "Now what does he want? . . . Hello?" "Hello Mr. Commissioner. I just wanted to say . . . " "Save it Pete. We've been over this a thousand times. You bet on baseball. Looks like you bet on your team too. You're living in Vegas, you own a bar, you still gamble on anything that moves. Including baseball. The deal was you were supposed to change. "' "Yeah, yeah, yeah. I know, I know, I know.
NEWS
August 21, 1987 | By BRUCE CHADWICK, New York Daily News
If America has a Brigadoon, that perfect Scottish village that emerges out of the mist once every 100 years, then it is Cooperstown. Each spring, when the heavy blankets of snow that cover upstate New York melt, the tiny (pop. 2,500) village of Cooperstown blooms as a town passed over by time, a town wonderfully stuck somewhere in the 19th century. All of this happens, quite appropriately, when from one end of the land to another the first sounds of baseballs smacked loudly by bats is heard.
NEWS
March 14, 2004 | By Nancy Savoth FOR THE INQUIRER
To a family that counts the days until pitchers and catchers report, nothing says spring like baseball, and nothing calls out spring break like Cooperstown, N.Y. Having three sons and one husband who are serious baseball fans, I knew it was inevitable that I would end up at the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum, but I was always banking on that being later rather than sooner. I was on a mission to find that "something for everyone" spring-break vacation when my husband looked up over his newspaper and pronounced, "It's time to take the boys to Cooperstown.
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SPORTS
December 18, 2015 | By Sam Donnellon, Daily News Columnist
'IT'S HIM again, Commissioner Manfred. " "Him who?" "Pete Rose. On line one. " "Now what does he want? . . . Hello?" "Hello Mr. Commissioner. I just wanted to say . . . " "Save it Pete. We've been over this a thousand times. You bet on baseball. Looks like you bet on your team too. You're living in Vegas, you own a bar, you still gamble on anything that moves. Including baseball. The deal was you were supposed to change. "' "Yeah, yeah, yeah. I know, I know, I know.
SPORTS
July 30, 2013 | BY RYAN LAWRENCE, Daily News Staff Writer rlawrence@phillynews.com
COOPERSTOWN, N.Y. - If there was a cornfield beyond the fence at Doubleday Field in downtown Cooperstown, you could have let your imagination run wild. Since the idyllic small town is home to the place where most baseball dreams begin and end, the National Baseball Hall of Fame, such daydreaming isn't just allowed. It's encouraged. So you could imagine Paul Hagen walking off the podium set along the massive stage at second base on Saturday afternoon and venturing out into the ether.
SPORTS
July 26, 2013 | BY RYAN LAWRENCE, Daily News Staff Writer rlawrence@phillynews.com
FOUR AUTUMNS ago, two sports writers were weaving through a sea of people in a crowded South Philly sports complex. At the same time the Phillies were hosting the Yankees in the 2009 World Series at Citizens Bank Park, one of the world's most popular rock bands, Pearl Jam, was playing for 4 straight nights across the street at the Wachovia Spectrum. "I was staying out by the airport and Paul [Hagen] said he'd give me a ride out there . . . but it was a hike to get to the car," said longtime Toronto Sun sports writer Bob Elliott.
SPORTS
January 14, 2013 | By Ellen Gray, Daily News TV Critic joe
They don't call him Charlie Hustle for nothing. Pete Rose is now taking the appeal of his lifetime ban from baseball to the court of "reality" TV in TLC's "Pete Rose: Hits & Mrs. " The first two regularly scheduled episodes air Monday, with sneak previews Sunday at 10 and 10:30 p.m. What at first looks like just another series about a seemingly mismatched pair - Rose's fiancee, Playboy model Kiana Kim, is a never-quite-specified number of decades...
SPORTS
January 11, 2013 | BY MARK PERNER, Daily News Staff Writer pernerm@phillynews.com
WHEN PAUL HAGEN was named the winner of the J.G. Taylor Spink Award for "meritorious contributions to baseball writing" last month, he never gave it a thought that he just might be the only living person to be honored at the Baseball Hall of Fame during induction weekend, July 26-28 in Cooperstown, N.Y. But that will be the case. With steroid-linked stars Barry Bonds, Roger Clemens and Sammy Sosa eligible for the first time, members of the Baseball Writers Association of America didn't vote in a single player.
SPORTS
December 5, 2012 | BY RYAN LAWRENCE, Daily News Staff Writer rlawrence@phillynews.com
NASHVILLE, Tenn. - Find an empty seat in the press box next to his in the summer or an empty bar stool at Frenchy's in Clearwater in March and he'll tell you stories. They'll be the most engaging baseball stories you're ever likely to hear and you'll be entertained for hours on end. That's what Paul Hagen is at heart: a storyteller. On Tuesday at the Opryland Hotel, Hagen briefly told the stories about the two times he stood at the podium at Cooperstown at the National Baseball Hall of Fame to introduce honorees.
NEWS
June 17, 2012 | By Gary A. Warner, Orange County Register
America is full of baseball pilgrimages and road trips. Fenway Park in Boston turns 100 this year. Wrigleyville, the neighborhood around Wrigley Field in Chicago, is the best baseball neighborhood in the country. California has five major-league teams to visit. New York City has two major-league teams and two minor-league ones. Road trippers can enjoy the Pioneer League with stops in Montana, Idaho, and Utah. But for me, a road trip from Louisville to Cooperstown is the quintessential baseball journey.
SPORTS
February 28, 2012
Major League Baseball last year came up with a concept: Let's build a "fan cave" in New York, an underground studio with a bank of big-screen televisions, and find a fan to watch every inning of every game in a season. That's 2,430 regular-season games, plus playoffs. Ten thousand fans applied. Two were chosen. There was a day game virtually every day, from April to October, and night games started at 7 in the East and didn't end in the West until 1 or 2 a.m. And in the mornings, when no games were actually being played, ballplayers and celebrities dropped by. The men in the fan cave blogged, tweeted, and drove social-media traffic.
TRAVEL
July 17, 2011 | By William Hageman, Chicago Tribune
COOPERSTOWN, N.Y. - You have time to think while on the road to the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. And you will be on the road, because there is no airport in Cooperstown. You think of the game's legends who have regularly visited the small (population 2,200) Upstate New York village. You think of the thousands of fans who jam Cooperstown every summer for the induction of former players and executives. You think, couldn't they have built the Hall near an airport?
SPORTS
July 6, 2009 | By Allen Barra FOR THE INQUIRER
The 2007 and 2008 New York Mets did the Phillies - and perhaps Dick Allen - a huge favor by managing to collapse two years in a row, thus paving the way for the Phillies to win the World Series last season. The Mets officially have erased the stigma once attached to the Phils' 1964 flameout. For years, that disaster has been melded in the minds of local fans with the six-year train wreck of Allen's first tenure in Philadelphia. It's time to admit what we've always known: Dick Allen belongs in the Hall of Fame.
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