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NEWS
September 28, 2011 | BY JASON NARK & WILLIAM BENDER, narkj@phillynews.com 215-854-5916
THE PAGAN stationed on a corner of Atlantic Avenue in Wildwood stood with his burly arms crossed over his belly, guarding the infamous motorcycle club's hotel-turned-fortress like a living, breathing gargoyle. Behind him, yellow caution tape and blue tarps draped the Binns Motor Inn - a signal from the Pagan's Motorcycle Club for "citizens" and nosy cops to keep out during the 2011 Roar to the Shore biker rally this month. It's the same hotel where federal prosecutors say that leaders of the Pagan's Long Island chapter at last year's rally told their minions to prepare for death or prison as they plotted a hand-grenade attack on the rival Hells Angels.
NEWS
March 28, 2012 | BY DANA DiFILIPPO & PHILLIP LUCAS, Daily News Staff Writers
MEN SHUFFLED along Chancellor Street toward the Gold Club early Saturday, nearly getting past a line of Dumpsters to the strip club's dingy red carpet before cops standing outside told them that the business was closed for the night. After the guys walked back down the alley, police led two women from the club in handcuffs toward 15th Street, where a police van was waiting with its back doors flung open. The Pennsylvania State Police busted the pair of buxom blondes earlier in the night in an undercover prostitution sting.
NEWS
August 21, 2013 | BY DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer geringd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5961
THE NEEDLES are gone from Needle Park. The children are back, fearlessly running over McPherson Square Park's five green acres without fear of being stuck by a used heroin syringe. The kids are hanging upside down from the new playground equipment, feeling the freedom of summer like they've never felt it before because the park - notorious for 30 years as Kensington's outdoor shooting gallery - is clean and peaceful for the first time in their young lives. "That playground is always crowded like it's Kensington's Rocky statue," said Patty-Pat Kozlowski, whose second summer directing a Parks and Recreation Department day camp is so unlike last year's, when she called police to remove an unconscious, bleeding addict from the play area and confronted a drug dealer doing business next to a woman selling shaved ice to the children.
NEWS
October 14, 2013 | By Ronnie Polaneczky, Daily News Columnist
I DON'T KNOW when Philip Nace became a Philadelphia police officer. But I have to believe, when he swore an oath to protect and serve, that he didn't imagine his future would include seeing his scowling red face on a Daily News cover about bully cops. But there he was, in yesterday's story by Bill Bender about a stop and frisk. Nace and another cop harangued two pedestrians in the 25th District after the men had - sigh - said hello to a third man unidentified on the street. To write the story, Bender didn't need to rely on anyone's memories of what went down.
NEWS
August 13, 2010
The Democrats, at long last, had strung together a good day. They forced House Republicans to return, grumbling, from summer vacation for votes that allowed Democrats to show support for teachers, cops, and strong borders. Then they got Rangeled. "For what purpose does the gentleman from New York seek recognition?" the speaker asked of Rep. Charlie Rangel, the fallen Ways and Means chairman, when he rose from his seat early Tuesday afternoon. The gentleman from New York sought recognition to deliver, without warning, one of the most extraordinary pieces of political oratory in recent memory.
NEWS
December 9, 2002
LET'S TALK about crooked cops. Philadelphia is known for many things - like cheesesteaks, pretzels, sports teams, and, yes, "crooked cops," too. It's a reality that has tarnished the image of this police department, and upsets the overwhelming majority of good cops who are doing a great job out there. I won't criticize any member of the public for making comments about crooked cops in Philly - instead I get disgusted with the dirty cops who give us this image. In my opinion, they are nothing but filthy pigs, and I'm tired of being embarrassed for their actions.
NEWS
October 3, 2014 | BY JULIE SHAW, Daily News Staff Writer shawj@phillynews.com, 215-854-2592
AN EX-COP who was fired last year has filed a lawsuit claiming his bosses retaliated against him for reporting alleged corruption and says he was discriminated against because he is white. Gerald Passalacqua, a former officer with the Narcotics Field Unit-South who had been with the department about 20 years, filed the federal lawsuit Wednesday against the city, Police Commissioner Charles Ramsey and others on the police force. The lawsuit claims he was falsely accused of taking $880 during a narcotics unit search of a South Philly drug house in September 2012.
NEWS
December 5, 2007
HAD THESE casinos broken ground, we would have had the money on the table to maybe have more police so they could keep from being shot and killed. All these people yapping not here, not there, no casino should be held responsible for the city not having the money for overtime. Moses Cook Philadelphia
NEWS
May 21, 2007
YOUR op-ed page informing us of the total cost of providing a new police officer was very interesting. But what price do you put on their lives? Police officers are a good investment for our city. They do a great job and are often not respected enough for the dangerous job they do. They give up living a normal life because they are police officers 24 hours a day. So, hats off to them, and may God always keep them in his sight. Josephine Zirilli Philadelphia
NEWS
July 27, 2012 | Bill Bender
Calculating the so-called street value of drugs is like trying to see into the future with a calculator. Experienced narcotics cops have a good idea of how drugs are packaged and sold to consumers, and they use that information to guesstimate how much a large shipment of drugs might have been worth down the line if it hadn't been confiscated. That usually involves dividing kilos and pounds into grams or smaller quantities then multiplying that by the retail value of each bag. Some cops, figuring that the drugs will be "cut" with other substances, use another multiplier.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 20, 2015 | BY JULIE SHAW, Daily News Staff Writer shawj@phillynews.com, 215-854-2592
A FEDERAL JURY in a civil case yesterday found that two police officers did not violate an ex-cop's constitutional rights and cause him harm when they stopped and frisked him in 2013 and did not use unreasonable force. But the ruling in favor of Officers David O'Connor, 31, and Brad Momme, 29, and against plaintiff Herbert Spellman, 51, raised some confusion because jurors on their verdict sheet also found that the cops acted "maliciously or wantonly in violating Mr. Spellman's federally protected rights," and imposed $10,000 in punitive damages against each cop. The jury questionnaire had instructed jurors not to proceed to the "maliciously or wantonly" question and not to consider damages if they answered "no" to the first two questions.
NEWS
March 18, 2015 | BY JULIE SHAW, Daily News Staff Writer shawj@phillynews.com, 215-854-2592
A FORMER Philly cop told a federal jury in a civil case yesterday that in September 2013, when he was walking to a bus stop, two police officers jumped out of a patrol car, grabbed him, stopped him for no reason, and verbally and physically abused him. "The tugging and pulling was bad enough. I was in pain," said Herbert Spellman, 51, who had been injured while on duty in a 2006 auto accident. "Then [for them] to start talking to you like you are a little kid! I'm a grown man . . . I'm a human being.
NEWS
March 16, 2015 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
IT'S THE LITTLE things that Constance Wilson remembers the most about her grandson, Robert. "That big smile" that he always had on his face; the way he would light up the room whenever he paid her one of his frequent visits; the hugs he would shower her with. "He was one of the best grandsons you could have," she said last week inside her living room in Angora, a tiny, close-knit neighborhood near the Delaware County border. "He was someone who wanted to do right, and that's what he did. " This morning, Wilson will say goodbye to her grandson.
NEWS
March 16, 2015 | BY STEPHANIE FARR, Daily News Staff Writer farrs@phillynews.com, 215-854-4225
A 25-YEAR-OLD woman was raped at the Montgomery Township tanning salon where she worked in late February, according to police. The victim was at the salon, the name of which the Daily News is withholding to protect her identity, when Marshall Gibson, 19, entered and asked to use the bathroom around 8:45 p.m. Feb. 25, according to police. He was given permission to use the restroom after which, he and the victim entered one of the tanning rooms together, police said. While in the room, Gibson made unwanted sexual advances toward the woman and then pulled out a knife, placed it to her throat and threatened to hurt her if she did not comply with his demands, according to the arrest affidavit.
NEWS
March 13, 2015 | BY JULIE SHAW, Daily News Staff Writer shawj@phillynews.com, 215-854-2592
A FORMER SEPTA Transit Police officer who was videotaped masturbating on a Broad Street Line train was convicted yesterday of open lewdness and indecent exposure. Kevin Fant, 44, worked for SEPTA and was off duty, dressed in a gray hoodie sweatshirt, black biker shorts and black sneakers, when someone videotaped him fondling himself. After viewing the short video of Fant pleasuring himself - which was not played in open court - and hearing from two SEPTA employees, Municipal Judge Karen Yvette Simmons convicted the former transit cop, who has since been fired, of the two misdemeanor charges.
NEWS
March 12, 2015 | BY REGINA MEDINA, Daily News Staff Writer medinar@phillynews.com, 215-854-5985
JAMES GERARD BECKER III, whose friends called him Ray or Jib, would have gotten such a kick out of yesterday's Eagles quarterback trade, his family said last night. The Kensington CAPA High School senior "would have had a field day with that," said his uncle Tony Becker, standing in a small kitchen in his brother's house. The teen's father, James G. Becker Jr., chimed in: "He wanted to work in sports any way he could get into it. " But his son's career dream was dashed Thursday when he was accidentally shot by classmate Ivan Oberholtzer inside Oberholtzer's bedroom in Kensington, a police spokeswoman said last night.
NEWS
March 12, 2015 | BY JULIE SHAW, Daily News Staff Writer shawj@phillynews.com, 215-854-2592
A JURY YESTERDAY acquitted a Feltonville man of attempted murder but convicted him of assault charges in the 2013 shooting of a police officer during a struggle inside a corner bodega. Eric Torres, 33, was convicted by the panel of nine women and three men of aggravated assault, assault of a law-enforcement officer and weapons offenses in the Aug. 13, 2013, shooting of Police Officer Edward Davies, who was shot in the abdomen. He was also convicted of aggravated and simple assault in relation to three other cops involved in the struggle at the Almonte Mini Market, 4th and Annsbury streets, in which cops were yelling to Torres to show his hands, but Torres refused.
NEWS
March 10, 2015 | BY JASON NARK, Daily News Staff Writer narkj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5916
WHEN CHURCH was over yesterday afternoon in North Philly, Jomo Brown walked over to a Lehigh Avenue shopping center and entered a Rite Aid, not really knowing what he was looking for or how it would help heal his pain. Brown, 45, looked over the shelves in Aisle 3, at the plastic Easter eggs and stuffed bunnies. He grabbed a red teddy bear, likely a leftover from Valentine's Day. He bought the $9 bear, which held a heart that said "I Love You," and the cashier put it in a black plastic bag. Brown took the bear outside, bent down and placed it amid a makeshift memorial of candles and flowers outside the GameStop store where Philadelphia Police Officer Robert F. Wilson III was fatally shot during a robbery Thursday afternoon.
NEWS
March 9, 2015 | BY VINNY VELLA, STEPHANIE FARR & DAVID GAMBACORTA, Daily News Staff Writers vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
YESTERDAY, THE CITY tried to make sense of a senseless act, to find answers among chaos. Why would a former high-school basketball ace throw away a promising career for petty robbery? What cruel fate led to a greedy bandit running into police officers during two unrelated robberies years apart? And, most of all, why did Officer Robert Wilson III, a dedicated public servant and caring family man, have to die while buying a gift for his son? "I think he redefined what a hero is all about," Police Commissioner Charles Ramsey said of Wilson.
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