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NEWS
March 19, 1997
A major lesson from the acquittal of the two punks charged with the murder of Kimberly Ernest is even more chilling than the fact that the killer presumably is still at large. Defects in the prosecution's case aside, the verdict poses another example of the nationwide crisis of confidence in those entrusted to protect the public and make our communities safe: the police. At one time, a confession was enough to convict. No longer. When a smart defense lawyer injects even slight suspicion in jurors' minds that the cops coerced the confession, unless there is substantive physical evidence, that shadow of doubt often springs a defendant.
NEWS
December 12, 1996 | by Dave Racher, Daily News Staff Writer
The paralyzed man said he looked right into the face of Antonio Brinson and swore he was the one who shot him last March 18. When cops grabbed him, they said Brinson was carrying a gun that had just been fired. "I saw him point a gun at me," testified the wheelchair-bound victim, Corey Seabrook, 24. "I looked at his face. I am positive it's him. " Not only that, but Brinson, 22, blurted out a confession when arrested, police said. Open-and-shut case? Think again.
NEWS
May 23, 2005
RE STOPPING gun violence: I find it amazing that although there is a police station at 65th and Woodland, there are always teens on the corners outside stores. The cops don't see this when they are patrolling? They never ask why the teens are on the corner? And the store owners, they just don't seem to care. But when people are getting off the trolleys they have to make sure they're clutching their packages or purses as they go to their destinations. I think we should start with the police in regard to stopping gun violence in Philadelphia.
NEWS
June 14, 1993 | by Edward Moran, Daily News Staff Writer
To con artists, pickpockets and street thugs, opening the Pennsylvania Convention Center would seem to be like letting a fox into a henhouse: Who could be easier prey than conventioneers wandering Center City lost, confused and loaded with cash, cameras and other valuables? Attention, foxes. Here's a message from the Philadelphia Police Department: There are going to be plenty of watchdogs in blue uniforms among those chickens. Police Commissioner Richard Neal said the department has developed specific plans for dealing with the influx of the tens of thousands of conventioneers who will be drawn each year to the $522 million center at 12th and Arch streets.
NEWS
October 22, 2007
MY HEART goes out to the families of William Windmaier and Joe Allulo, the guards who were senselessly murdered afer retiring as police officers. You'd think they could enjoy life, after a stressful job. No. Income had to be supplemented because health benefits stop after five years and pension received is less than half-pay. When are we going to take care of our police and firefighters? Josephine Zirilli, Philadelphia
NEWS
November 27, 1998 | by Dave Racher, Daily News Staff Writer
The teen-ager is accused of trying to steal Thanksgiving from a 38-year-old West Philadelphia man. But he got gobbled up instead. Yesterday, after allegedly robbing Michael Smith, of Yewdall Street, of $15 he was going to use to buy stuffing and "other turkey trimmings," Shaun Bazemore, 17, had his wings clipped by two alert cops. Police Lt. Gerald McShea and Sgt. Michael J. Chitwood Jr. hunted down Bazemore after he fled into his house on Addison Street near 54th. After they entered, the cops could smell dinner as it was being prepared.
NEWS
September 15, 2006
JOHN PERZEL'S proposed new program to hire 10,000 more cops (1,345 in Philadelphia) is a first step in fighting crime. But where will the arrested criminals be housed? There is nothing in the proposal for new jails. Currently, the talk in Philadelphia is of the possible release of criminals because of overcrowding in our prison system. Will more arrests by more cops mean more prisoner releases? Why spend more on a good thing when the result is more criminals back on our streets?
NEWS
December 3, 1997 | by Mister Mann Frisby, Daily News Staff Writer
Police at the Jersey shore shot a man to death last night after he stabbed his wife and her 15-year-old cousin to death in a domestic argument, authorities said. The 21-year-old knife-wielder's bloody rampage occurred at his single-family home on Cedar Avenue in Somers Point. After he stabbed his 19-year-old wife and her cousin about 7:20 p.m., cops arrived and killed him, said Janet Niedosik, a spokeswoman for the Atlantic County prosecutor's office. Another woman in the house called the Somers Point police after the knifings.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 23, 1990 | By Francesca Chapman, Daily News Staff Writer
A cop with black leather chaps over her jeans, flowing blonde locks and bright red lipstick is steering a van at top speed - the wrong way down a one- way street. Her passenger, struggling breathlessly to hang on to his seat, gasps, "Who are you?" "I'm a street bitch with an attitude," she snarls. An attitude, and more. She gets high on adrenaline. She has nymphomaniacal tendencies. She's been diagnosed and certified. Then there are her partners: the schizophrenic kleptomaniac and the short guy with the Napoleon complex and a steel plate in his head.
NEWS
July 11, 1996 | by Julie Knipe Brown, Daily News Staff Writer
A Bucks County man told police he spent his Fourth of July staring down the barrel of a gun pointed at him by a carjacker in Bensalem, getting beat up by a gang of hoodlums in North Philadelphia, dodging bullets at 4th Street and Indiana Avenue, and walking four miles covered in blood looking for a pay phone. Don't think so, said police. Turns out 27-year-old Richard Gillespie didn't get carjacked. He got clobbered by drug dealers after he drove to North Philadelphia to buy dope.
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