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NEWS
August 26, 2013 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
He was browsing through a flea market in New Hope about 25 years ago when he first eyed the dark, varnish-covered document behind a cracked glass pane amid other old frames. Tom Lingenfelter felt drawn to the relic, though it was "filthy and disintegrating. " Was this a souvenir copy of the Declaration of Independence issued during the nation's 1876 Centennial? Lingenfelter spotted the words Anastatic Fac-simile printed on the document, decided to buy it for $100, then stored it for about 15 years, not realizing what he had. Not until 2006, when he learned about an ingenious but destructive early copying process and compared his Declaration with another rare anastatic copy, held by the National Park Service at Independence National Historical Park.
TRAVEL
March 25, 2012
Whimsical time-waster or travel hero - you decide. Name: www.visastamper.com What it does: Creates a virtual representation of your passport. Back up your passport using the Visastamper website, or enter the dates and locations you've been to and Visastamper will create a passport for you. You can also stamp your current location while on the road, or use its iPhone or iPad app to help. What's hot: The graphics and stamps are cool. It really does look like a passport.
NEWS
March 13, 1986 | By DAVE RACHER, Daily News Staff Writer
Discount diamond jeweler Ron Perlstein, in hot water for allegedly misrepresenting the weight and color of diamonds he sold to customers, says he's prepared to take a financial bath to make sure the district attorney's office doesn't sink him with his own records. Perlstein may have to hock some of his gems to pay for photocopying thousands of books and records seized by the district attorney's office in a raid on his Center City store. "That's right," said defense attorney Stanford Shmukler.
NEWS
January 2, 1994 | By Larry Copeland, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
James C. Young, 52, a copy editor at The Inquirer and creator of a computer system that would give the blind increased access to newspapers, died Friday at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital. Mr. Young, a self-described independent scholar, possessed a wide-ranging knowledge, and his incisive questioning of reporters' copy kept many an error out of the newspaper. "Jim was an editor with a lot of zest for his work," said Jeff Price, assistant managing editor/copy desks. "He loved talking to reporters about their stories.
SPORTS
May 18, 1989 | From Inquirer Wire Services
The free-lance writer who wrote the Margo Adams story for Penthouse magazine said yesterday that he had acquired a copy of baseball's confidential report on Pete Rose's gambling, but rejected a deal to sell it. "Pete Rose can rest easy. It will not be sold, and that's the end of that," said David D. Shumacher, who declined to say how he got the report, who had bid for it or how much was offered. He confirmed that there had been a $20,000 offer. "I have been advised by my attorneys not to sell the report," Shumacher said from his California home.
NEWS
June 11, 1989 | By Edda R. Pitassi, Special to The Inquirer
Faced with a full house and a brief agenda, East Pikeland supervisors were caught by surprise at their Tuesday public session as a frustrated resident, Jim Whelan, presented them with a copy of a letter dated that day from the Chester County Health Department. The letter, written by an environmental health specialist to the supervisors, addressed neighbors' complaints to the county Health Department about serious sewage malfunctions at the eastern end of the township, where septic systems are in use. Supervisor John Doyle asked about the whereabouts of the original letter.
NEWS
June 6, 2004 | By Victoria Donohoe INQUIRER ART CRITIC
John Goodyear is on to something in his solo painting show at the Gallery of Fine Art in Newtown, Bucks County, 35 featured works on view in several media titled "The Socrates Series. " He realizes that it is the artistic fashion to copy the past instead of learning from it, but he is determined to derail mere copying. This Lambertville artist and longtime Rutgers University art professor, you might believe, parodies everybody. No. His featured works relate to two different and seemingly unrelated paintings, their significance woven together by him in fresh ways.
NEWS
February 6, 2011 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
James Arthur O'Connor, 86, an editor at The Inquirer for 29 years, died Thursday, Jan. 27, of complications from a stroke at Granville House, an assisted-living facility in Burlington Township. Mr. O'Connor was a copy reader at the Toronto Telegram and a book reviewer at the Vancouver Sun before joining the Detroit News in 1951. The next year he married Henrietta Case, an artist. They had been introduced by her father and two brothers, who worked with Mr. O'Connor on the copy desk. In 1960, the Detroit News changed ownerships, and the staff was fired.
NEWS
July 12, 1995 | By Louis S. Hansen, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Township supervisors have adopted a five-page resolution that spells out new procedures for residents to get a look at township files. Want a copy? It'll cost you. Under the resolution adopted last week by the board, Limerick will charge $1 a page for copies of public records and $15 an hour - with a $7.50 minimum - for township staff members to watch patrons read and copy files. Township manager Ed Fink said the fees reflect the cost of township employees' answering requests for documents.
NEWS
September 12, 2010 | By Nathan Gorenstein, John Sullivan, and Jeff Shields, Inquirer Staff Writers
Philadelphia Housing Authority chief Carl R. Greene retained a team of retired FBI agents to stake out an aide to Board Chairman John F. Street, videotape her movements, and copy her computer hard drives, according to a confidential PHA report obtained by The Inquirer. The private investigators, hired to determine whether the aide, Kafi Lindsay, 34, was going to work, concluded that her attendance was "sporadic," that she may have done private legal work on PHA time, and that she appeared "to be in violation of one or more PHA policies," including the agency's residency requirement.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 28, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
I T DIDN'T TAKE a whole lot to make Jon Weir happy: his wife's spaghetti-and-meatballs dinner, a souvenir hat from a sporting event, a stroll along State Street in Media, watching his children play sports, a bike ride on the Ocean City boardwalk. For a man who was exposed as a newspaper copy editor to the frequently painful reality of breaking news for 46 years, his need for simple pleasures was understandable. Colleagues remember a devoted professional who could keep his cool even when big news was breaking on deadline, and could be counted on to get the copy out, clean and clear.
NEWS
July 5, 2014 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
The two documents are rarely exhibited - and not easily accessed behind the many layers of security. To see them, Lee Arnold, library director at the Historical Society of Pennsylvania, uses an entry card to pass into an elevator, then into a large locked room, No. 210. Inside, he twirls the tumbler of a combination lock on thick vault doors, then swings them open to reveal still another set of metal doors with a coded digital lock. Beyond is the climate-controlled chamber filled with historical treasures - and a heavy safe, accessed by keys held only by Arnold and the institution's director of research.
SPORTS
March 4, 2014 | By Marcus Hayes, Daily News Staff Writer
THE EFFECTS of Allen Iverson's career and carriage cannot be overstated. He influenced not only a league but a culture; braided, tatted and 'tuded; valiant, defiant, unapologetic. The 76ers retired Iverson's No. 3 on Saturday night at the Wells Fargo Center in a stirring ceremony that offered a respite from the catastrophe they have created this season. Yesterday afternoon, Villanova dismantled Marquette on the court under which Iverson's number now hangs. If the Wildcats weren't aware that Big East nemesis Creighton lost Saturday night, putting Villanova atop the conference, it was because they were watching A.I.'s love-in.
NEWS
February 28, 2014 | By Wendy Rosenfield, For The Inquirer
If we're judging strictly by box office numbers, Mamma Mia! marks a watershed for women in theater. Produced, written, and directed by women, since its 1999 London premiere the show has been everywhere, done everything, and raked in billions of dollars to the tunes of an Abba soundtrack. This still-surprisingly feminist plot set on a romantic Greek isle is the Aphrodite of all jukebox musicals: a work so pleasing to the eye and ear that none can resist its charms. Except we're not judging by numbers, we're judging this particular tour (the show's third U.S. tour, and seventh pass through Philadelphia)
NEWS
February 21, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
IT WAS JUST like Jack Thompson to think of plucking a hair from the tail of a tiger. Well, he didn't pluck it himself. He got a keeper at the Philadelphia Zoo to do the plucking by holding a piece of meat in one hand and grabbing the hair with the other. "It was a great thing," said Jack's wife, Mary Pat Timony. "He was jumping up and down. " What, you might well ask, did Jack Thompson want with the hair of a tiger? He was working as the advertising manager for a company called Nuclide Industries, which made mass spectrometers - used to "determine the elemental signature of a sample," as it is described - like the hair of a tiger.
BUSINESS
February 11, 2014 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Columnist
Peering through the plate-glass windows of the new retail space on Market Street in West Philadelphia, Jiaqi Wu thought she was looking at just another coffee shop in a town brimming with them. Then she reconsidered, thinking they must be serving something extraordinary, given the name on the door: The Creative Café @ Replica. "I was wondering if the coffee itself was creative," recalled Wu, a Californian pursuing a master's degree in applied positive psychology from the University of Pennsylvania.
NEWS
January 7, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
WHEN JULIE Liedman arrived at the Philadelphia Bulletin as a fresh-faced kid out of Penn State in 1967, she needed to learn how to be a reporter and writer for a big-city daily. Lucky for her, there was a friendly, lighthearted and supremely talented editor to help her learn the trade. Peggy Higgins was suburban editor for the Bulletin and she took Julie under her wing. A sharp contrast to some of the gruff and crusty men who ran the news operation for the newspaper that nearly everybody read, Peggy was kind and understanding.
NEWS
August 26, 2013 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
He was browsing through a flea market in New Hope about 25 years ago when he first eyed the dark, varnish-covered document behind a cracked glass pane amid other old frames. Tom Lingenfelter felt drawn to the relic, though it was "filthy and disintegrating. " Was this a souvenir copy of the Declaration of Independence issued during the nation's 1876 Centennial? Lingenfelter spotted the words Anastatic Fac-simile printed on the document, decided to buy it for $100, then stored it for about 15 years, not realizing what he had. Not until 2006, when he learned about an ingenious but destructive early copying process and compared his Declaration with another rare anastatic copy, held by the National Park Service at Independence National Historical Park.
NEWS
May 23, 2013 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Culture Writer
As the result of a historic agreement between the New York Public Library and the State of Pennsylvania, the National Constitution Center will exhibit one of the original copies of the Bill of Rights that President George Washington dispatched to the states in 1789 for ratification. Pennsylvania and the library will jointly care for and display the document for the next century. Announcement of the agreement is set for a Wednesday news conference at the center on Independence Mall.
NEWS
May 10, 2013 | By Steve and Mia
Q: My husband and I got married two years ago. I thought we did everything right. We went to the courthouse and got a license. After the ceremony, the rabbi gave me the pink copy of the license. He also told me that he was going to file his copy at the courthouse in the next few days. Well, time slips away and this piece of paper did not seem important. In the process of buying a house recently, the bank asked for a copy of our marriage license. I went online to the department of vital statics to order one, and it seems there is no record of our marriage.
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