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Cornel West

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August 31, 2011
CORNEL WEST wrote an amazing op-ed for the New York Times last week, essentially arguing that slain civil rights leader Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. would have disliked his new statue - "he never confused substance with symbolism" - and would have preferred to be remembered via an ongoing struggle for social change. Within the piece is a withering takedown of contemporary pop culture, worth considering: "Materialism is a spiritual catastrophe, promoted by a corporate media multiplex and a culture industry that have hardened the hearts of hard-core consumers and coarsened the consciences of would-be citizens.
NEWS
October 14, 2004
IT'S true: Democracy definitely matters. And your feature on Cornel West was important in highlighting that. It is important to draw attention to prominent African-American voices during this election to inspire young Americans to vote and to educate my generation on the significance of our participation in this election. What better way to do it than through what we understand best: pop culture. West's idea to use hip-hop as a form of education is the ultimate way to attract young people to politics.
NEWS
September 14, 2012 | BY VALERIE RUSS, Daily News Staff Writer
PBS talk-show host Tavis Smiley and philosophy professor Cornel West are bringing their "Poverty Tour" to a North Philadelphia Baptist church Friday . "The Poverty Tour 2.0: A Call to Conscience" is to focus attention on the poor during the presidential campaign. "We simply want to accent the humanity and decency of poor people of all colors," West wrote on Twitter Thursday. West teaches at Union Theological Seminary in New York and hosts a nationally-syndicated radio talk show with Smiley.
NEWS
October 7, 2004 | By Annette John-Hall INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Not many Ivy League professors have books on the best-seller lists, sandwiched between Confessions of an Heiress by pop tart Paris Hilton and My Life by Bill Clinton. But Princeton's Cornel West - the most public kind of intellectual - does. The author of Democracy Matters: Winning the Fight Against Imperialism (Penguin Press), No. 11 on the New York Times chart, chuckles at the notion of book-list democracy in action. "You find genius in ordinary folk," he says, in an office that is floor-to-ceiling full of books, mainly biographies, from Ella Fitzgerald to Socrates.
NEWS
October 30, 1998 | By Russell J. Rickford, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Harvard University philosopher and preeminent African American studies scholar Cornel West urged a brimming Rowan University audience yesterday not to wait until graduation to begin wrestling with America's enduring questions of race and class inequity. "There's still too much unjustified suffering in Glassboro, in L.A., in Moscow . . . in the world," West said, challenging nearly 1,000 students and faculty members gathered in Wilson Concert Hall to "situate yourself in a story bigger than you, locate yourself in a narrative grander than you. " The author of Race Matters and other books and essays on interracial relations, West, 45, appeared on campus for a talk sponsored jointly by Rowan's new president, Donald J. Farish, and its African American studies program.
NEWS
November 7, 1995 | By Justin Pritchard, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Cornel West sat still, hand on hirsute chin, head rocked back, looking up toward the crest of the packed Haverford College auditorium as below his gaze an eager audience listened to a glowing introduction. Best-selling author of nearly a dozen books, most recently Race Matters. Harvard University professor of religion and Afro-American studies. Frequent guest on Sunday-morning television roundtables, often to discuss race relations in the United States. West, 42, came as the headliner of a Saturday symposium titled "Diversity and Creativity in Critical Thinking.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 23, 1993 | By Carlin Romano, INQUIRER BOOK CRITIC
He's been called the "preeminent African-American intellectual of our generation" by no less than Henry Louis Gates Jr., Harvard's director of African-American Studies. He's already published, at the age of 40, eight books, including Prophesy Deliverance! An Afro-American Revolutionary Christianity (1982), The American Evasion of Philosophy (1989), The Ethical Dimensions of Marxist Thought (1991), and the just-released Race Matters (Beacon Press), his first work to be distributed by a major trade house.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 8, 2010 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
GhettoPhysics: Will the Real Pimps and Ho's Please Stand Up ! is a radically ingenious, in-your-face documentary hybrid that takes the basic street relationship between pimps and hookers and holds it up on a global scale. "When the leader is pimpin' you on some game like patriotism," says E. Raymond Brown, GhettoPhysics' wily onscreen guide and codirector, "it's the ho's that go marchin' off to war gettin' shot up and stabbed. " Or, credit card companies: pimps.
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NEWS
July 22, 2016
By Erec Smith On July 12, in the twilight of his second term, President Obama spoke at the funerals of the officers slain in Dallas, prescribing unity and collaboration as the antidotes to America's racial divide. His speech came more than eight years after his campaign speech "A More Perfect Union," delivered as he sought the presidency. As his time in office winds down, Obama's presidency is bookended by speeches about race and unity because as a nation, we prefer to sit back and wait for someone to solve the problem instead of taking it on ourselves.
NEWS
May 6, 2013 | By Karen Heller, Inquirer Columnist
The latest documentary about Pennsylvania's most famous inmate is called Long Distance Revolutionary: A Journey With Mumia Abu-Jamal . Which is fitting. Because the longer the distance from Philadelphia, the deeper the convicted cop killer's support tends to be. In England, journalist Tariq Ali suggests Abu-Jamal should be awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. In France, he gets a street, a stamp, the first honorary citizenship of Paris since Pablo Picasso. Stephen Vittoria's movie, which opened Friday, is a compelling and powerful work, though perhaps not for the reasons the director intended.
NEWS
September 16, 2012 | BY VALERIE RUSS, Daily News Staff Writer
TAVIS SMILEY and Cornel West spent three hours talking Friday with Philadelphians about education, "decarceration," jobs and housing at a Baptist Church in North Philadelphia. "The poverty numbers in this country are abysmal," Smiley, the PBS late-night television host, told the crowd filling the pews at Tenth Memorial Baptist Church. Smiley said that unless properly addressed, the high rate of poverty "will threaten our democracy and become a national-security issue. " Smiley said he and West, who teaches philosophy at Union Seminary in New York, embarked on the "Poverty Tour 2.0: A Call to Conscience" this week because they believe that neither President Obama nor Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney have addressed the issue enough.
NEWS
May 20, 2012 | Reviewed by Jonathan Rée
America the Philosophical By Carlin Romano Alfred A. Knopf. 672 pp. $35 By general consent, the great classic of 20th-century American philosophy is John Rawls' Theory of Justice, which appeared in 1971. Bill Clinton once said that when he and Hillary read it in law school, they immediately realized that liberty, equality, and human rights had been established on a "brilliant new foundation of reason. " Around the same time, a pushy Princeton undergraduate with journalistic ambitions asked the mighty philosopher for an interview, only to be turned away with a gentle Harvard smile.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 2011 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Eminent Princeton University scholar Cornel West and 18 fellow activists were arrested Sunday and jailed overnight for protesting on the steps of the U.S. Supreme Court. They were released Monday without charges. West, 58, whose books include Keeping Faith: Philosophy and Race in America , took part in a joint October 2011 and Stop the Machine demo against "the Supreme Court giving too much power to the corporations . . . and not holding corporations accountable for their behavior," co-organizer Margaret Flowers tells Politico.com.
NEWS
October 14, 2011
IN THEORY, AMERICANS like diversity. We try to see the world through Captain Noah multicolored glasses. But when we actually get down to practicing what's preached, the fallacy of social pluralism emerges in all its sordid hypocrisy. Take Sarah Palin. (And don't say "Please!") For all their admirable rhetoric about the value of being an independent woman with strongly held convictions, the professional feminists were appalled at the rise of this pro-life, pro-gun female pit bull. Ever since she roared onto the scene in 2008, Palin has been ridiculed and vilified for many things, not the least of which are her decidedly anti-liberal-establishment positions on "women's issues" like abortion (and abortion and abortion)
ENTERTAINMENT
August 31, 2011
CORNEL WEST wrote an amazing op-ed for the New York Times last week, essentially arguing that slain civil rights leader Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. would have disliked his new statue - "he never confused substance with symbolism" - and would have preferred to be remembered via an ongoing struggle for social change. Within the piece is a withering takedown of contemporary pop culture, worth considering: "Materialism is a spiritual catastrophe, promoted by a corporate media multiplex and a culture industry that have hardened the hearts of hard-core consumers and coarsened the consciences of would-be citizens.
NEWS
August 5, 2011 | By Annette John-Hall, Inquirer Columnist
I'll let you in on a little secret: When it comes to black folks having political disagreements, we don't like to air our dirty laundry. This approach, I'm sure, was born out of cultural necessity. Historically, we've been oppressed so much, why inflict the same treatment on each other? Plus, the civil-rights movement taught us to always present a united front. With unity, we could overcome. Certainly African Americans have presented a united front in the wake of all of the slings and arrows being tossed at President Obama.
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