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NEWS
March 9, 2016
ITHACA, N.Y. - Cornell President Elizabeth Garrett, the first woman to hold that position, has died of colon cancer after less than a year on the job, the university said Monday. She was 52. Garrett, who became president of the Ivy League school on July 1, died Sunday night at her home, Cornell said. "While Beth's tenure as president has tragically been cut short, her efforts over the last eight months have set the university on a path toward continued excellence," said Robert Harrison, chairman of the Cornell board of trustees.
NEWS
February 19, 1990 | By Joe Santoliquito, Special to The Inquirer
While making a recruiting visit to Cornell University in Ithaca, N.Y., the weekend of Feb. 9, Rich Gortian was told by one of the football players that the food was the best in the country. However, it wasn't the cafeteria cuisine that finally persuaded Cardinal O'Hara's 6-foot, 1-inch, 195-pound defensive back on Wednesday to give an oral commitment to play football for the Big Red. "I always wanted to attend an Ivy League school, and Cornell seemed to be what I perceived a college to be like," Gortian said.
NEWS
August 7, 2016
The End of American Childhood A History of Parenting from Life on the Frontier to the Managed Child By Paula S. Fass Princeton University Press. 334 pp. $29.95 Reviewed by Glenn C. Althschuler Fearful that even a momentary lapse in oversight will ruin their children's future, many American parents micromanage. Others worry that "helicopter parents" may produce individuals who are overcontrolled, overindulged, and ill-prepared for a competitive world in which competence must be earned through hard work and independent thinking.
NEWS
June 5, 2016
How the War on Government Led Us to Forget What Made America Prosper By Jacob S. Hacker and Paul Pierson Simon & Schuster. 455 pp. $28 Reviewed by Glenn C. Altschuler In his first inaugural address, Ronald Reagan declared, "Government is not the solution to our problem; government is the problem. " In the ensuing decades, this view has become the mantra of the Republican Party - and of a sizable segment of the American electorate. In American Amnesia , Jacob Hacker, a professor of political science at Yale University, and Paul Pierson, a professor of political science at the University of California at Berkeley, provide an Everest of evidence that Reagan was wrong.
NEWS
March 9, 2016 | By Alfred Lubrano, Staff Writer
Veterinarian Dominic Dallago pets his patient, a domestic short-haired cat with diarrhea, as though she can't harm him. But lurking in the dense black fur of the purring 10-year-old feline (Dallago won't name her for privacy reasons) are allergens that don't pussyfoot around - microscopic proteins poised to attack like throat-choking commandos, to lay the allergic doctor low by triggering his asthma. "I usually sniffle, snort," said Dallago, 37, who works at World of Animals Veterinary Hospital in the Rittenhouse Square area.
NEWS
July 18, 2016 | By Susan Snyder, Staff Writer
Temple University in the last year drew record applications, scored a six-spot jump in U.S. News & World Report rankings, moved into the top 100 universities for research expenditures, had unprecedented fund-raising, and enjoyed its most spectacular football season in decades. The Owls were flying high. And yet, the 38,000-student university in the heart of North Philadelphia is facing one of the greatest leadership crises in its history. In the span of two weeks, its president fired its provost, and its board of trustees, in turn, took a vote of no confidence in the president and announced its intention to fire him. That means the university is poised to lose its two top leaders in high-profile ousters that are unusual in and of themselves, but coming at the same time, are even more extraordinary, experts say. "It's pretty unusual, especially that a board would intervene so quickly on the dismissal of a provost without talking extensively with the president, without a thorough investigation," said Joni Finney, director of the Institute for Research on Higher Education at the University of Pennsylvania.
NEWS
April 17, 2016 | By Susan Snyder, Staff Writer
Dickinson College is preparing to launch a major fund-raising campaign, but its current president, Nancy A. Roseman, won't be raising the funds. Roseman, who arrived at Dickinson in 2013 as the first female leader in the college's long history, said she would resign, effective June 30. "It's an eight-year marathon," Roseman, 57, said of the upcoming campaign. "You have to have a consuming appetite to take that on. I just recognize in myself that I didn't have the appetite for that eight-year marathon.
NEWS
February 20, 2016 | By Susan Snyder, Staff Writer
Delaware Valley University, founded 120 years ago as a farm school that catered to Jewish men, took another leap from its past Thursday with the hiring of its first female president, an agronomist currently working as a dean at the University of Hawaii at Manoa. Maria Gallo, 53, a Cornell University graduate who grew up in Port Chester, N.Y., will take the helm July 1. She replaces Joseph S. Brosnan, who announced last year that he planned to retire at the end of this school year. Gallo, dean of the College of Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources, said she was attracted by the university's mission, history, and core values, as well as its proximity to family in New York and New Jersey.
BUSINESS
April 25, 2015 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Staff Writer
    St. Joseph's University has been selected to offer the acclaimed Entrepreneurship Bootcamp for Veterans (EBV) with Disabilities, a small-business education program founded in 2007 at the Whitman School of Management at Syracuse University, the schools announced Thursday. At St. Joseph's, the program will be offered through the Erivan K. Haub School of Business. To date, nearly 1,000 veterans have graduated from EBV programs throughout the U.S., resulting in the creation of more than 200 veteran-owned businesses.
REAL_ESTATE
October 12, 2014 | By Erin Arvedlund, Inquirer Staff Writer
He started his business during the financial crisis, yet Greg Lingo, founder of Cornell Homes, was able to sell the successful building company to Ryland Homes. Today, as Cornell Homes by Ryland Homes, he continues building new projects in the Philadelphia suburbs such as Reserve at Rose Tree in Media. A Delaware County native and graduate of Upper Darby High School, Lingo earned an engineering degree at Cornell University (hence the company's moniker) and an M.B.A. from Villanova.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 7, 2016
The End of American Childhood A History of Parenting from Life on the Frontier to the Managed Child By Paula S. Fass Princeton University Press. 334 pp. $29.95 Reviewed by Glenn C. Althschuler Fearful that even a momentary lapse in oversight will ruin their children's future, many American parents micromanage. Others worry that "helicopter parents" may produce individuals who are overcontrolled, overindulged, and ill-prepared for a competitive world in which competence must be earned through hard work and independent thinking.
NEWS
July 18, 2016 | By Susan Snyder, Staff Writer
Temple University in the last year drew record applications, scored a six-spot jump in U.S. News & World Report rankings, moved into the top 100 universities for research expenditures, had unprecedented fund-raising, and enjoyed its most spectacular football season in decades. The Owls were flying high. And yet, the 38,000-student university in the heart of North Philadelphia is facing one of the greatest leadership crises in its history. In the span of two weeks, its president fired its provost, and its board of trustees, in turn, took a vote of no confidence in the president and announced its intention to fire him. That means the university is poised to lose its two top leaders in high-profile ousters that are unusual in and of themselves, but coming at the same time, are even more extraordinary, experts say. "It's pretty unusual, especially that a board would intervene so quickly on the dismissal of a provost without talking extensively with the president, without a thorough investigation," said Joni Finney, director of the Institute for Research on Higher Education at the University of Pennsylvania.
NEWS
June 30, 2016 | By Olivia Exstrum, STAFF WRITER
Joanne Huntington Tunnell was a trailblazer, a fierce advocate for women's education known for her intelligence and independent spirit. "She was very opinionated, but not judgmental," said daughter Kathleen Handel. "She was always very understanding and tried to see things from your perspective. " Ms. Tunnell, 86, of West Chester, who with her husband started a fund to support education for girls, died Friday, June 17, of a heart attack at Paoli Hospital. Ms. Tunnell was born in Rochester, N.Y., and her family moved several times because of economic hardship during the Great Depression.
NEWS
June 5, 2016
How the War on Government Led Us to Forget What Made America Prosper By Jacob S. Hacker and Paul Pierson Simon & Schuster. 455 pp. $28 Reviewed by Glenn C. Altschuler In his first inaugural address, Ronald Reagan declared, "Government is not the solution to our problem; government is the problem. " In the ensuing decades, this view has become the mantra of the Republican Party - and of a sizable segment of the American electorate. In American Amnesia , Jacob Hacker, a professor of political science at Yale University, and Paul Pierson, a professor of political science at the University of California at Berkeley, provide an Everest of evidence that Reagan was wrong.
NEWS
April 17, 2016 | By Susan Snyder, Staff Writer
Dickinson College is preparing to launch a major fund-raising campaign, but its current president, Nancy A. Roseman, won't be raising the funds. Roseman, who arrived at Dickinson in 2013 as the first female leader in the college's long history, said she would resign, effective June 30. "It's an eight-year marathon," Roseman, 57, said of the upcoming campaign. "You have to have a consuming appetite to take that on. I just recognize in myself that I didn't have the appetite for that eight-year marathon.
NEWS
April 9, 2016 | By Walter F. Naedele, Staff Writer
"When you look at the sparkle of the ocean or the beautiful trees in the Pinelands or see the pristine streams, that's Ruth's legacy," Jeff Tittel, New Jersey Sierra Club director, said of the passing of environmental activist Ruth Hamilton Fisher. "Ruth fought many battles in New Jersey, from incinerators to landfills to pesticide spraying," Tittel wrote in an appreciation. "She worked hard to stop overdevelopment in Cape May County and to preserve open space. " On Thursday, March 31, Ruth Hamilton Fisher, 86, of South Dennis, founder of the Citizens Association for the Protection of the Environment (CAPE)
NEWS
March 9, 2016
ITHACA, N.Y. - Cornell President Elizabeth Garrett, the first woman to hold that position, has died of colon cancer after less than a year on the job, the university said Monday. She was 52. Garrett, who became president of the Ivy League school on July 1, died Sunday night at her home, Cornell said. "While Beth's tenure as president has tragically been cut short, her efforts over the last eight months have set the university on a path toward continued excellence," said Robert Harrison, chairman of the Cornell board of trustees.
NEWS
March 9, 2016 | By Alfred Lubrano, Staff Writer
Veterinarian Dominic Dallago pets his patient, a domestic short-haired cat with diarrhea, as though she can't harm him. But lurking in the dense black fur of the purring 10-year-old feline (Dallago won't name her for privacy reasons) are allergens that don't pussyfoot around - microscopic proteins poised to attack like throat-choking commandos, to lay the allergic doctor low by triggering his asthma. "I usually sniffle, snort," said Dallago, 37, who works at World of Animals Veterinary Hospital in the Rittenhouse Square area.
NEWS
February 20, 2016 | By Susan Snyder, Staff Writer
Delaware Valley University, founded 120 years ago as a farm school that catered to Jewish men, took another leap from its past Thursday with the hiring of its first female president, an agronomist currently working as a dean at the University of Hawaii at Manoa. Maria Gallo, 53, a Cornell University graduate who grew up in Port Chester, N.Y., will take the helm July 1. She replaces Joseph S. Brosnan, who announced last year that he planned to retire at the end of this school year. Gallo, dean of the College of Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources, said she was attracted by the university's mission, history, and core values, as well as its proximity to family in New York and New Jersey.
NEWS
November 10, 2015 | By David Klein, Inquirer Staff Writer
Dr. Mona Reidenberg Sutnick, 79, of Center City, died Oct. 25 of complications from dementia. Dr. Sutnick was an award-winning nutrition educator and author of the book Nutrition and Women's Health . Though she was born in Philadelphia in 1936, she spent her childhood in a variety of locations, thanks to her father's job as a Navy doctor during WWII. "She used to say that she must have attended six different schools before the sixth grade," said her husband, Dr. Alton Sutnick.
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