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Corporal Punishment

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NEWS
April 15, 1994
OK, it's time for America to use the old Singapore Sling if that's what it takes to rid our city and nation of violent crime committed by juveniles. The situation in Singapore should awaken citizens here that it's time to get serious in addressing our problem with juvenile offenders. Please don't get me wrong - I am not saying set up the whipping post in City Hall courtyard and administer daytime floggings. But let's look at an effective way to deal with youthful offenders that will deter them from repeating acts that violate society's rules.
NEWS
December 22, 1988 | By Nancy Scott, Special to The Inquirer
Tonight, the Rose Tree Media school board is expected to approve the first reading of a policy to bar corporal punishment from its schools. According to district director of pupil services Ken Rose, the district presently authorizes classroom teachers to use corporal punishment as a disciplinary measure. The new policy would allow a teacher to strike a student only in defense or to stop a disturbance, obtain a weapon or protect others. The policy has rarely been used.
NEWS
September 13, 1990 | BY EDWARD JOHN HUDAK
This summer, disabled Americans were granted federal protection from discrimination when President Bush signed the Americans with Disabilities Act. But according to a U.S. congressman from New York and a psychologist from Philadelphia, one group of disabled persons is no better off now than they were before the act. This prompts the psychologist, Dr. Irwin Hyman, to claim that "for some special education children, it is more a case of a thousand...
NEWS
January 16, 1999 | By Michael Pastore
Standing in line at the library yesterday, I watched a young parent whap a child's backside. When the child cried, she was ordered to stop, and when the crying didn't stop, the parent hit her again. Usually, in these situations, I'd watch now and feel guilty later. But this time, I spoke out. Politely, I said: "Hitting doesn't work. There are better ways to teach children how to behave. " The child stopped crying and looked at me with wide-open eyes. The glaring mother shouted at me to mind my own business (mind my own expletive business!
NEWS
May 14, 1986 | By Julia M. Klein, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jerome Smith, assistant principal at North Brandywine Junior High School in Coatesville, said he did not particularly enjoy hitting children who misbehaved with the wooden paddle he kept in his office. "But it's part of the job," he said. His method, he said, is to "hit a child once in the buttocks in the presence of another adult. " And, he said, he never paddles any child who objects. "If a child says 'no,' that ends the paddling," he said. "I'm not going to forcibly paddle any child.
NEWS
November 30, 1989 | By Patrick Scott, Special to The Inquirer
Corporal punishment may be on its way out at the Tredyffrin/Easttown School District. A policy revision that would prohibit the use of physical force against students was introduced by the Board of School Directors on Monday night. Jamieson McKenzie, superintendent of the school district, said in an interview Tuesday that he was surprised to see that corporal punishment was permitted in the district when he came on board in July from the Princeton, N.J., school district. Pennsylvania is one of the few states that allows corporal punishment, he said.
NEWS
February 11, 2005 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Irwin A. Hyman, 69, of Holland, a Temple University professor of school psychology who campaigned for more than 30 years against corporal punishment of children, died Monday at home from complications of leukemia. In 1968, Dr. Hyman joined the Temple faculty. Nine years later, he became the founding director of the school's National Center for the Study of Corporal Punishment and Alternatives. He also maintained a private psychology practice in Holland. Dr. Hyman was a prolific writer and lecturer.
NEWS
January 19, 1991 | By Stella M. Eisele, Special to The Inquirer
Dave Stewart, principal of Phoenixville Junior High, has to retire the wooden paddle that occasionally has stung the backsides of unruly students sent to him for discipline. That's because the Phoenixville Area Board of Education in Chester County on Thursday night withdrew its approval of corporal punishment, joining a trend toward disciplining children without physical force. "It's a very poor example to children about how we solve problems," said Nadine Block, coordinator of the National Coalition to Abolish Corporal Punishment in Schools.
NEWS
June 11, 1987 | By Nancy Scott, Special to The Inquirer
Three proposed new policies concerning student trips, corporal punishment and tuberculosis testing were read for the first time at the Upper Darby school board meeting Tuesday night. The new student-trip proposal specifically addressed questions that had been raised concerning extended trips, on which students are away for an extended period of time or travel a great distance. The issue had been raised at the board's May 12 meeting when a request was made by music director Jospeh Capolupo requesting permission to take a group of students to London next spring.
NEWS
July 16, 1987 | By Nancy Scott, Special to The Inquirer
Policies concerning student trips, corporal punishment and tuberculosis testing have been approved by the Upper Darby School Board. The new student-trip policy, approved Tuesday night, addresses questions that had been raised concerning extended trips - those on which students go away for an extended peiod of time or travel a great distance. Officials decided that the policy needed revision at a May meeting after music director Joseph Capolupo asked permission to take a group of Upper Darby High School students to London next spring.
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NEWS
September 18, 2014
WE'VE JUST passed Week 2 of the NFL season, and the X's and O's have been overshadowed by the V's and A's - that is, violence and abuse charges. Week 1 of the season gave us the continuing debate over Ray Rice, domestic violence and the NFL. Week 2 gives us the debate over Adrian Peterson, running back for the Minnesota Vikings, and charges of child abuse involving the use of a tree limb to "whip" his 4-year-old son to discipline him. My first observation...
NEWS
September 16, 2013
Success in numbers I had to smile while reading about Andrew Jackson School in South Philadelphia, where teachers expressed consternation at having to deal with classes of 32 to 36 students. In the mid- to late 1950s, I attended a Philadelphia parochial school where class size regularly approached 90 students, and my fourth-grade class actually had 101 children. How did our teachers, the Sisters of the Immaculate Heart of Mary and a small contingent of young, dedicated lay teachers, manage?
NEWS
June 21, 2013
HARRISBURG - Three bills to change how child-abuse investigations are handled were closer to becoming law yesterday after favorable votes in the state House of Representatives. The House voted overwhelmingly to send the Senate the proposals, which are among the legislation under consideration since the Jerry Sandusky child-molestation scandal raised concerns about the adequacy of state laws to protect children. One bill would establish procedures to report child abuse online or by email and require those who must report suspected abuse to inform their supervisors and call the ChildLine hotline.
NEWS
April 5, 2013 | By Sam Wood, PHILLY.COM
Unless he can quickly raise $270,000, a Saudi man will soon face court-ordered surgical paralysis from the waist down, Amnesty International reports. Justice in Saudi Arabia in the 21st Century still revolves around the principle of lex talionis , better known to Westerners as "an eye for an eye. " The case stems from 2003, when, Ali al-Khawahir, then 14, stabbed a friend in the back. The crime caused al-Khawahir's friend to be paralyzed from the waist down. Finding him guilty in the assault, the court in the town of Al-Ahsa sentenced al-Khawahir to "qisas" - retribution - or pay the victims's family one million Saudi riyals in "blood money.
NEWS
November 29, 2011
By Jonathan Zimmerman Have you ever hit a child? If so, join the club: Roughly 80 percent of American parents admit that they have slapped, spanked, or struck their children. And 20 states still allow corporal punishment in public schools, where about 100,000 students are "paddled" each year. That's in stark contrast to the rest of the world, which has increasingly prohibited the physical punishment of children. Americans like to see themselves as being at the forefront of historical change, leading humanity to ever more freedom and progress.
NEWS
October 25, 2011 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
PHOENIX - Nearly two weeks after a 5-year-old girl seemingly vanished outside her suburban Phoenix home, police were no closer yesterday to figuring out what happened to her as her family criticized the investigation. Jahessye Shockley has been missing since Oct. 11 after police believe she wandered from her apartment in Glendale, outside Phoenix. The case points to a kidnapping because cops found no trace of her after combing a 3-mile radius around her home. "This little girl doesn't just fall off the face of the earth," Glendale police Sgt. Brent Coombs said yesterday.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 22, 2011
T HE PROBLEM of Philadelphia's violent teen mobs is the biggest hot-button issue of the summer and one that Charles A. Williams III, an educational psychologist and director of the Center for the Prevention of School-Aged Violence, has been spending a lot of time thinking about lately. He sat down with me last week for a wide-ranging conversation that touched on Mayor Nutter, juvenile curfews and hip-hop.   Jen: Someone needs to open a can of whoop-ass on flash-mob hooligans, right?
NEWS
June 11, 2011 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Tobyann Auerbach Boonin, 84, of Center City, an advocate for parents and children and a former member of the Philadelphia Board of Education, died of complications from a stroke Friday, June 10, at Penn Hospice at Rittenhouse. In 1969, Mrs. Boonin, who had been president of the Home and School Association at Ellwood School in East Oak Lane and served on the Philadelphia Home and School Council, was appointed to the board by Mayor James H.J. Tate. For the next 12 years, she worked to balance budgets and integrate schools, led the movement to mainstream children with disabilities in public schools, and helped initiate programs to allow pregnant students to remain in school.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 10, 2011
DEAR ABBY: It has recently come to my attention that at work I am considered "bossy. " It came as a shock to me. I'm hurt that my co-workers and department manager think of me this way. I know I come on strong sometimes when it comes to helping customers, but I view it as helping. When I suggest to co-workers that they keep their areas clean and orderly, it is perceived as bossy. I'm just trying to help them not get fired for slacking off. I'm older than some of my co-workers and my manager.
NEWS
May 20, 2011 | By DENA POTTER, Associated Press
VIRGINIA BEACH, Va. - Single mothers, former drug addicts and other beaten-down young women who came to wealthy businessman Henry Allen Fitzsimmons for a chance to climb out of their financial hole knew his help came with a catch. In exchange for an allowance, a place to live and promise of a college education, they agreed to be spanked if they broke his rules. At least six of the women said that his corporal punishment went too far, including one who alleges that he sexually assaulted her. Now the 54-year-old Virginia Beach restaurateur faces felony charges.
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