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Corporate Average Fuel Economy

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NEWS
February 15, 2006 | Sheth Jones
I agree that the President's call for energy independence was short on details and calls for personal sacrifice. However, it is silly to insist that the key to significant fuel savings is to raise federal corporate average fuel economy (CAFE) standards. Escalating gas prices force automakers to develop more fuel-efficient vehicles without government intervention. Many people are quick to blame America's appetite for oil on the automakers, but that is like saying a drug dealer forces an addict to use his products.
NEWS
August 1, 2001
YOU CAN HAVE YOUR SUV and fuel efficiency, too. You can have safe vehicles and a safer environment, too. You may have to spend a thousand or two extra, but you'll make it back in reduced gas costs. So said the National Academy of Sciences this week in a report that (you should pardon the expression) demolished arguments by the auto industry that we had to choose between our cars and our atmosphere. Or our cars and our safety. The industry claims that fuel efficiency standards lead to more small cars, and more deaths, on the road.
NEWS
August 1, 2001
With gas prices at record lows in the 1990s, automakers concentrated on increasing their products' speed, heft and performance. Little care was given to fuel efficiency. What did it matter with buck-a-gallon gas? In fact, if it weren't for the Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) standards enacted during the 1970s energy crisis, gas mileage might have plunged, and consumption skyrocketed. Without CAFE standards, Americans would be using 2.8 million more barrels of oil each day, exacerbating today's concerns about higher prices and dependence on imports.
NEWS
July 24, 2001 | By Froma Harrop
A great mystery of life is why American automakers go ballistic at any demand for better mileage on their SUVs and other light trucks. One can understand why the oilmen don't like fuel efficiency. The more gasoline pumped into the tank, the more money they make. That makes sense. But what's in it for Detroit? After all, the sort of miles-per-gallon increase likely to become law should not be that onerous. The standards are nearly 20 years old. American manufacturers have since made tremendous strides in fuel efficiency.
BUSINESS
April 8, 1992 | By David Everett, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
A long-awaited, taxpayer-financed study of automotive fuel economy suggests that higher gasoline taxes or fees for gas-guzzling cars could encourage greater fuel savings from the auto industry. The National Research Council report, ordered by the Bush Administration, also said yesterday that over the next 14 years cars could be designed to average 34 to 37 miles per gallon without sacrificing safety. The carefully worded report pleased most everyone involved in the contentious debate over fuel economy, yet parts of the $800,000 study may surprise the White House.
BUSINESS
September 8, 1989 | By David Everett, Inquirer Washington Bureau
Officials from America's biggest carmakers ran into an embarrassing problem yesterday when they told a Senate subcommittee they would not be able to meet tighter automobile fuel-economy rules. At least one senator simply did not believe them. Citing similar and, as it turned out, unfounded congressional testimony of 15 years ago, Nevada Democrat Richard Bryan loudly asked, "Why should I believe you now?" The conflict occurred at a hearing on Bryan's proposal to require automakers to increase their vehicles' fuel efficiency 20 percent by 1995 and 40 percent by 2001.
NEWS
October 4, 1988 | From Inquirer Wire Services
The Transportation Department, citing the need to protect American automakers and workers from foreign competition, eased federal fuel-economy requirements for 1989 model cars yesterday, setting them at 26.5 m.p.g. The decision marked the fourth year in a row that the Reagan administration has not met the corporate average fuel economy, or CAFE, standard established by Congress in 1975 to conserve fuel and reduce air pollution. The average reached the required 27.5 m.p.g. in 1985 but has been lower each year since then.
NEWS
July 24, 2001 | By JEFF JACOBY
A PANEL appointed by the National Academy of Sciences is going to recommend an increase in the mandatory fuel efficiency of new vehicles, especially pickups and SUVs. That news appeared in the New York Times just as the House Energy and Commerce Committee took up a bill to promote conservation by, among other things, making fuel standards more stringent. Playing up the report on Page 1 gave a boost to those who insist that the bill doesn't go far enough in regulating pickups and SUVs.
NEWS
March 25, 2002 | By Froma Harrop
Forget about Congress. It's not going to do a thing about reducing the nation's dependence on fossil fuels. This column is addressed to you, the American consumer. The Senate rejected the bill raising fuel economy standards for new motor vehicles. The actual vote was not the worst part of this business. The worst part was the campaign to savage the reputation of fuel-efficient cars. Opponents of the bill equated big SUVs with safety and smaller cars with danger. Some of the nuttier commentary referred to efficient vehicles as "killer cars.
NEWS
May 20, 1991 | By GEORGE F. WILL
Nevada's junior U.S. senator, Richard H. Bryan, is a Democrat who has picked a democratic fight, one involving everyone - everyone, including Nevadans, who drive long distances at high speeds, usually in cars bigger than the senator's bill would allow. His bill would raise CAFE (corporate average fuel economy) standards from the current 27.5 miles per gallon to approximately 34 in 1996 and 40 in 2001. His is a perversely efficient proposal, demonstrating the many vagaries of regulations and the many ways intended improvements can make matters worse.
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NEWS
December 22, 2013 | By Al Haas, For The Inquirer
The average fuel economy for a new car in the United States is 25 m.p.g. That's far less than the 121 m.p.g.-equivalent of the Scion iQ EV, which is the most fuel-efficient passenger vehicle on the market. But what if a car could get 200 miles per gallon? That's what Volkswagen has achieved with its XL1 - a two-seater that will be the most fuel-efficient car to ever go into production when it makes its way down a German assembly line next year. With a price tag of about $145,000, the return on investment, at current fuel prices, would take decades.
NEWS
February 15, 2006 | Sheth Jones
I agree that the President's call for energy independence was short on details and calls for personal sacrifice. However, it is silly to insist that the key to significant fuel savings is to raise federal corporate average fuel economy (CAFE) standards. Escalating gas prices force automakers to develop more fuel-efficient vehicles without government intervention. Many people are quick to blame America's appetite for oil on the automakers, but that is like saying a drug dealer forces an addict to use his products.
NEWS
March 25, 2002 | By Froma Harrop
Forget about Congress. It's not going to do a thing about reducing the nation's dependence on fossil fuels. This column is addressed to you, the American consumer. The Senate rejected the bill raising fuel economy standards for new motor vehicles. The actual vote was not the worst part of this business. The worst part was the campaign to savage the reputation of fuel-efficient cars. Opponents of the bill equated big SUVs with safety and smaller cars with danger. Some of the nuttier commentary referred to efficient vehicles as "killer cars.
NEWS
August 1, 2001
YOU CAN HAVE YOUR SUV and fuel efficiency, too. You can have safe vehicles and a safer environment, too. You may have to spend a thousand or two extra, but you'll make it back in reduced gas costs. So said the National Academy of Sciences this week in a report that (you should pardon the expression) demolished arguments by the auto industry that we had to choose between our cars and our atmosphere. Or our cars and our safety. The industry claims that fuel efficiency standards lead to more small cars, and more deaths, on the road.
NEWS
August 1, 2001
With gas prices at record lows in the 1990s, automakers concentrated on increasing their products' speed, heft and performance. Little care was given to fuel efficiency. What did it matter with buck-a-gallon gas? In fact, if it weren't for the Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) standards enacted during the 1970s energy crisis, gas mileage might have plunged, and consumption skyrocketed. Without CAFE standards, Americans would be using 2.8 million more barrels of oil each day, exacerbating today's concerns about higher prices and dependence on imports.
NEWS
July 24, 2001 | By JEFF JACOBY
A PANEL appointed by the National Academy of Sciences is going to recommend an increase in the mandatory fuel efficiency of new vehicles, especially pickups and SUVs. That news appeared in the New York Times just as the House Energy and Commerce Committee took up a bill to promote conservation by, among other things, making fuel standards more stringent. Playing up the report on Page 1 gave a boost to those who insist that the bill doesn't go far enough in regulating pickups and SUVs.
NEWS
July 24, 2001 | By Froma Harrop
A great mystery of life is why American automakers go ballistic at any demand for better mileage on their SUVs and other light trucks. One can understand why the oilmen don't like fuel efficiency. The more gasoline pumped into the tank, the more money they make. That makes sense. But what's in it for Detroit? After all, the sort of miles-per-gallon increase likely to become law should not be that onerous. The standards are nearly 20 years old. American manufacturers have since made tremendous strides in fuel efficiency.
NEWS
March 6, 1999
It's not hard to understand the appeal of those big sport-utility vehicles. They're comfortable - many of them as roomy and plush as the most expensive luxury sedan. They can carry everybody in the clan and their toys: bikes, skis, skates, and all the luggage that attends today's upwardly mobile American family. And they give the illusion of safety: big, high bumpers, acres of hood and fender out there. But it's just an illusion; safety statistics show that SUVs are more likely than sedans to roll over in a collision.
NEWS
October 4, 1992 | By Andrew Maykuth, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In automobile-manufacturing states like Michigan, the presidential campaign rarely strays far from the CAFE clash. CAFE is not a place to get espresso. It stands for Corporate Average Fuel Economy, the federal program that requires each auto company's car fleet to average 27.5 miles per gallon. The debate over fuel efficiency is a barometer of a candidate's environmentalist sympathies - and where each stands as they argue whether environmental controls mean a loss in jobs.
BUSINESS
April 8, 1992 | By David Everett, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
A long-awaited, taxpayer-financed study of automotive fuel economy suggests that higher gasoline taxes or fees for gas-guzzling cars could encourage greater fuel savings from the auto industry. The National Research Council report, ordered by the Bush Administration, also said yesterday that over the next 14 years cars could be designed to average 34 to 37 miles per gallon without sacrificing safety. The carefully worded report pleased most everyone involved in the contentious debate over fuel economy, yet parts of the $800,000 study may surprise the White House.
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