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Corporate Executives

NEWS
April 16, 1996 | New York Daily News
Federal agents found antidepressants, guns, an "autobiography" and a list of corporate executives in the cabin that served as a virtual bomb factory for Unabom suspect Theodore Kaczynski, FBI records released yesterday show. The 34-page document - the most detailed inventory yet of the former Berkeley professor's 10-by-12 foot shack - lists more than 700 items removed by FBI agents. The federal judge who released the records also ruled that Kaczynski's lawyers can tour the cabin to see the results of the 13-day search.
BUSINESS
December 1, 1986 | By FREDERICK H. LOWE, Daily News Staff Writer
A party to celebrate the topping out of One Liberty Place, soon to be Philadelphia's tallest office building, will go on despite a scheduling conflict with the Pennsylvania Society Dinner, considered by many to be the biggest social and political event of the year. Rouse & Associates, developers of the 60-story building at 17th and Market streets, is giving a party Friday evening, Dec. 12, at the Philadelphia Museum of Art to celebrate the completion of the roof of the first building in the city to tower over Billy Penn's hat. The date of Rouse's party, however, conflicts with the 88th annual Pennsylvania Society Dinner, which is held at New York's Waldorf-Astoria Hotel and is attended by some of the state's top politicians, corporate executives, lawyers, labor leaders and lobbyists - many of the same people Rouse wants to attend his bash.
BUSINESS
July 3, 1992 | by Rose DeWolf, Daily News Staff Writer
You think only corporate executives get stock deals? In an unusual - possibly unique - provision of their collective bargaining agreement, Sun Co. employees represented by Oil, Chemical and Atomic Workers (OCAW) Local 990 in Philadelphia will receive 100 shares of restricted company stock. That's on top of a 9.5 percent wage increase. The contract affects 294 workers at Sun's 130,000-barrel-a-day refinery in the city. Sun acquired the refinery in 1988 as part of its purchase of Atlantic Petroleum Corp.
NEWS
October 22, 2010 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
June Waldo Lytel-Murphy, 80, a retired professor of English at Villanova University, died of complications from diabetes Tuesday, Oct. 19, at Haverford Estates. Mrs. Lytel-Murphy became a teaching assistant at Villanova in 1969, while earning a master's degree in English, and joined the faculty in 1971. In her three decades at Villanova, she taught American literature, introduced journalism courses into the curriculum, and helped found the Women's Studies Program. Her journalism students include Diana K. Sugg, a medical writer for the Baltimore Sun who won a Pulitzer Prize for beat reporting in 2003, and Gerald Marzorati, an assistant managing editor at the New York Times.
NEWS
January 10, 1992 | By RICHARD COHEN
It's the manner of television to have everything balanced. Thus we can say that on This Week With David Brinkley, George F. Will represents the right, Sam Donaldson the left and Cokie Roberts something in between. In this way, all bases are covered and agreement almost never reached - until this week that is. On the subject of executive pay, Will, Donaldson and Roberts agreed on Sunday: It's too high. The show aired sometime after midnight in Seoul, which is where President Bush happened to be at the time.
NEWS
June 17, 1988 | By Richard Burke, Inquirer Staff Writer
A federal judge yesterday sentenced two former executives of Beech-Nut Nutrition Corp. to a year and a day in prison for selling millions of bottles of phony apple juice intended for babies. Niels L. Hoyvald, 54, former president and chief executive officer of Beech-Nut, and John F. Lavery, 56, former vice president of operations, also were fined $100,000 each for their roles in what prosecutors said was "one of the largest consumer frauds ever . . . prosecuted by the Department of Justice.
BUSINESS
April 11, 1995 | By Frank Swoboda, WASHINGTON POST Inquirer staff writer Andrea Knox contributed to this story
The whole world is being downsized. A survey of top corporate executives in the world's leading industrial nations shows that 94 percent of them have put their companies through some form of reorganization, or downsizing, in the last two years, and 66 percent predict the pace of change will continue or accelerate in the years ahead. Nearly 2,000 leaders of Fortune 500-size companies in Canada, France, Germany, Japan, Great Britain and the United States were interviewed by Watson Wyatt Worldwide, the international consulting firm.
NEWS
September 27, 1999 | By S. Joseph Hagenmayer, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Julian J. Aresty, 92, a philanthropist whose family was particularly supportive of the University of Pennsylvania, died Tuesday at the Medical Center at Princeton from complications following a heart attack. He had resided in Princeton Borough for the last 30 years and previously resided in Trenton. He was born in Monastir, Macedonia, now Bitole, and later settled in Rochester, N.Y. Mr. Aresty was a co-owner of S.P. Dunham & Co., Central Jersey's leading department store with four locations.
NEWS
May 13, 2003 | By Larry Eichel INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Flyers have played their last game in the First Union Center. And pretty soon, the Sixers will play theirs, too. No, the teams aren't going anywhere, and neither is the arena. Only the name will change. In a few months, the building that opened as the CoreStates Center in 1996 will be rechristened the Wachovia Center, its third name in seven years. Such are the perils of the naming-rights game. Names of businesses change, and sports facilities must follow. Even when companies don't go down the tubes, they get bought up, merge, and establish new identities.
BUSINESS
March 2, 2010 | By Bob Fernandez INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Hispanic civil rights and advocacy groups met in Philadelphia yesterday with top executives at Comcast Corp. and NBC Universal Inc. to discuss Hispanic media issues related to the proposed $30 billion merger of the cable company and the entertainment giant. The meeting was part of the full-court press by Comcast and NBC to court favor with special-interest groups that might oppose the merger in Congress and at the Federal Communications Commission. D'Arcy Rudnay, senior vice president of communications at Comcast, said the meeting was private and was one of many Comcast was holding.
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