CollectionsCorporate Travel
IN THE NEWS

Corporate Travel

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
September 22, 2001 | By Benjamin Y. Lowe INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As the decline in travel after last week's terrorist attacks continued, Rosenbluth International, a Center City corporate travel agency, cut all of its employees' pay and laid off about 20 percent of its worldwide workforce. The changes, effective Monday, were announced in a memo to employees on Sept. 14. The memo said the moves resulted from "astronomical" cuts in air travel after the attacks in New York and near Washington. "It goes without saying that the travel management and agency community is not immune to the effects of this crisis," the memo said.
BUSINESS
December 10, 1987 | By SUSAN GUREVITZ, Special to the Daily News
People do not live by vacations alone. Or, in this case, a travel agency chain can't live on vacation business alone, either. That's one of the key reasons Bartlett Travel has joined up with Travel One. Bartlett Travel, with about 105 people in six offices in the Philadelphia area, purchased Travel One, which employs 45 people in seven offices, as its carrier into the corporate travel business. The merged company boasts gross sales of more than $40 million. Terms of the transaction were not disclosed.
BUSINESS
August 7, 2003 | By Tom Belden INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The pending acquisition of Philadelphia's Rosenbluth International travel agency by American Express Co. has dozens of Rosenbluth clients worried that they will be forgotten once they are being served by a huge corporation, an industry survey has found. The survey by the Business Travel Coalition, a Radnor group that represents corporate travel managers, did not find widespread opposition - or much enthusiasm - for the combination of two of the world's five biggest agencies. But Rosenbluth clients in particular who responded to the survey, which was released this week, said that, once their contracts with American Express expired, they would consider using smaller agencies that can charge less for their services because they have lower overhead, the survey found.
BUSINESS
January 29, 1999 | by Marc Meltzer, Daily News Staff Writer
Gen Xers, where are all of you? The TV audience of young adults may be shrinking for one very good reason - there are fewer young adults today than a decade ago. A Connecticut-based advertising firm, KGA of Middletown, which specializes in tracking shifts in population, cites research that says the audience of 18-to-34-year-olds is smaller by as much as 10 percent. In other words, there were more baby boomers than there are Gen Xers. For the networks, it's bad news. A smaller audience can mean less advertising dollars.
BUSINESS
January 7, 1992 | by Jenice M. Armstrong, Daily News Staff Writer
Never mind the recession. Philadelphians have been gobbling up USAir's $318 roundtrip fares to Paris like hot dogs at a baseball game. "They're saying, 'The hell with it. Let me go now . . . it'll probably get worse before it gets better,' " said Mark Teichmann, president of Mark IV Travel in Society Hill. "We've got quite a few bookings. " Jeannie Eleftherion, an office manager for Sampson Travel, which has offices in Center City and Radnor, said she's noticed the same.
BUSINESS
December 30, 1991 | By Tom Belden, Inquirer Staff Writer
1991 was a grim year for business travel. First the Persian Gulf war and then the recession led companies everywhere to cut back on travel. Travel managers, corporate travel agencies and business travelers all have been asked to wrack their brains in search of ways to lower costs. It was, no doubt, this fevered atmosphere of expense-account slashing that led an anonymous individual or group to draft a memo this fall, listing some of the most draconian ideas imaginable for saving money.
BUSINESS
June 14, 1993 | By Tom Belden, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Managing a multimillion-dollar travel budget for a group of demanding professionals is easy, right? Just ask the Clinton administration. For a while, it thought it could get rid of the whole White House travel office staff and replace it with a 25- year-old cousin of the President, with the help of a midsize Little Rock travel agency. But the truth is that managing travel isn't always as simple as it seems. Many travel professionals would have advised the administration that before taking such a drastic step, which it later had to rescind, it first should have sought the advice of a professional travel consultant.
BUSINESS
February 15, 1988 | By Tom Belden, Inquirer Staff Writer
Corporate travel managers, naturally, hunger for better information about travel costs. They are equally eager to find ways to put a dent in those expenses. But that is only the beginning of the insights found in a survey of 100 corporate travel managers conducted by Runzheimer International, a major research and consulting firm that specializes in helping companies control travel costs. More than three-quarters of those responding to the survey, or 77 percent, listed obtaining better information on travel costs and reducing travel expenses as their top goals for 1988.
BUSINESS
June 13, 1988 | By Tom Belden, Inquirer Staff Writer
In an era when business-travel costs are shooting up - at a rate more than three times that of inflation, in fact - the need to manage expenses efficiently is growing by the day. But for any organization trying to understand its travel costs and how they can be reduced, there are no hard-and-fast rules about picking the right travel agency. Huge agencies specializing in corporate travel, with offices across the country or around the world, have a distinct advantage, especially for larger corporations, because of the breadth of their operations and the sophistication of the information they can provide.
BUSINESS
December 28, 2012 | By Joan Lowy, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - For many passengers, air travel is only about finding the cheapest fare. But as airlines offer a proliferating list of add-on services, from early boarding to premium seating and baggage fees, the ability to comparison-shop for the lowest total fare is eroding. Global distribution systems that supply flight and fare data to travel agents and online ticketing services like Orbitz and Expedia, accounting for half of all U.S. airline tickets, complain that airlines won't provide fee information in a way that lets them make it handy for consumers trying to find the best deal.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
December 28, 2012 | By Joan Lowy, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - For many passengers, air travel is only about finding the cheapest fare. But as airlines offer a proliferating list of add-on services, from early boarding to premium seating and baggage fees, the ability to comparison-shop for the lowest total fare is eroding. Global distribution systems that supply flight and fare data to travel agents and online ticketing services like Orbitz and Expedia, accounting for half of all U.S. airline tickets, complain that airlines won't provide fee information in a way that lets them make it handy for consumers trying to find the best deal.
BUSINESS
January 27, 2010 | By Suzette Parmley INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Since Day One, says Terese Roseau, a banker from St. Johns, Antigua, she has felt a special connection with the staff at Philadelphia's Holiday Inn Express Midtown hotel. So much so that when Roseau is here every three months for ongoing medical treatment at nearby Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, she won't stay anywhere else. "They're excellent. From the front office to the kitchen, I know them all by their first names," said Roseau, 43, as she sat scrolling through messages on her laptop recently in a hotel room equipped with all-new carpeting, furniture, bedding, drapes, and a flat-screen HDTV.
BUSINESS
November 26, 2008 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
With the economy in a tailspin, companies are slashing travel and entertainment budgets in a shift toward frugality. They are requiring employees to book trips earlier to get better deals, fly coach instead of business- and first-class, take day trips rather than stay overnight, choose less expensive hotels, and limit travel to only what is essential to see customers. Cuts in attendance at trade shows and meetings is just one example of the new austerity, said Andrew Ziolkowski, a vice president at Carpenter Technology Corp.
BUSINESS
August 9, 2006 | By Akweli Parker INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Philadelphia-based StarCite Inc. and Santa Clara, Calif., company OnVantage Inc. planned to announce today a merger of their two Web-based meetings-management firms. Officials with the two companies did not disclose terms of the transaction, but said no cash or stock would change hands in the "merger of equals. " The combined company, which will keep the StarCite name, will have about 350 employees, and its headquarters will be in Philadelphia. Among other services, the companies use Web-based automation to remove much of the grunt work from making corporate travel and meeting plans.
BUSINESS
October 8, 2003 | By Tom Belden INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
What Hal Rosenbluth really wants to do next is play football for the University of Pennsylvania. So what if he's 51 years old, five-foot-six, and has spent the last dozen years as chief executive officer of one of the world's largest travel agencies? "Maybe if I sign up for some classes, they'll let me play," he said, sitting in his Center City office and gazing across the Schuylkill at Franklin Field, where his father, a Penn graduate, took him to a game against Cornell when was 12. "I can block and tackle.
BUSINESS
August 7, 2003 | By Tom Belden INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The pending acquisition of Philadelphia's Rosenbluth International travel agency by American Express Co. has dozens of Rosenbluth clients worried that they will be forgotten once they are being served by a huge corporation, an industry survey has found. The survey by the Business Travel Coalition, a Radnor group that represents corporate travel managers, did not find widespread opposition - or much enthusiasm - for the combination of two of the world's five biggest agencies. But Rosenbluth clients in particular who responded to the survey, which was released this week, said that, once their contracts with American Express expired, they would consider using smaller agencies that can charge less for their services because they have lower overhead, the survey found.
BUSINESS
April 5, 2003 | By Wendy Tanaka and Tom Belden INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Fear of contracting severe acute respiratory syndrome, or SARS, has prompted some business travelers and students to curtail travel to Asia, where the disease originated. International flight bookings at the Philadelphia-based Rosenbluth International corporate travel agency are 60 percent below normal levels, Hal F. Rosenbluth, chairman and chief executive officer, said yesterday. "There's virtually nobody going to Hong Kong from the States, from Europe, or from our offices in Asia," he said.
BUSINESS
September 22, 2001 | By Benjamin Y. Lowe INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As the decline in travel after last week's terrorist attacks continued, Rosenbluth International, a Center City corporate travel agency, cut all of its employees' pay and laid off about 20 percent of its worldwide workforce. The changes, effective Monday, were announced in a memo to employees on Sept. 14. The memo said the moves resulted from "astronomical" cuts in air travel after the attacks in New York and near Washington. "It goes without saying that the travel management and agency community is not immune to the effects of this crisis," the memo said.
BUSINESS
January 29, 1999 | by Marc Meltzer, Daily News Staff Writer
Gen Xers, where are all of you? The TV audience of young adults may be shrinking for one very good reason - there are fewer young adults today than a decade ago. A Connecticut-based advertising firm, KGA of Middletown, which specializes in tracking shifts in population, cites research that says the audience of 18-to-34-year-olds is smaller by as much as 10 percent. In other words, there were more baby boomers than there are Gen Xers. For the networks, it's bad news. A smaller audience can mean less advertising dollars.
BUSINESS
February 16, 1998 | By Dianna Sinovic, FOR THE INQUIRER
Adventure, travel, exotic locations - those are lures for American workers whose companies send them abroad. But what happens when an emergency strikes? What happens, for instance, if you have a heart attack while playing tennis in a remote site in western Africa? For one employee at Chemonics International, it meant being whisked from Mali to a Paris hospital in only 12 hours. The flight alone took six hours, said Chemonics president Thurston Teele. Another company's employee who had a similar emergency in the region died for lack of adequate medical care, Teele said.
1 | 2 | 3 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|