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Corporate Travel

BUSINESS
August 9, 2006 | By Akweli Parker INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Philadelphia-based StarCite Inc. and Santa Clara, Calif., company OnVantage Inc. planned to announce today a merger of their two Web-based meetings-management firms. Officials with the two companies did not disclose terms of the transaction, but said no cash or stock would change hands in the "merger of equals. " The combined company, which will keep the StarCite name, will have about 350 employees, and its headquarters will be in Philadelphia. Among other services, the companies use Web-based automation to remove much of the grunt work from making corporate travel and meeting plans.
BUSINESS
September 28, 2015 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Federal Aviation Administration is a huge bureaucracy with perennial funding issues. Among its many duties is overseeing thousands of air traffic controllers at hundreds of airports and planes ranging from private jets to passenger airliners to military transports. Conversation is building in Washington on this question: Would the FAA be better able to handle its regulatory duties if the day-to-day operations of air traffic control were privatized? There is no specific plan, and the accompanying issues are numerous: Would the private entity be a nonprofit?
BUSINESS
April 30, 2014 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
Virgin America, California's hip and high-tech airline, is pulling its flights from Philadelphia to Los Angeles and San Francisco, and flying the airplanes instead to more lucrative corporate travel markets - between Dallas and New York City and Washington. The airline began Philadelphia flights two years ago. It said the service will end Oct. 6. The Burlingame, Calif., carrier said Friday that it had been awarded two gates at Dallas' Love Field by the Justice Department and planned to begin flights in October to New York LaGuardia and Reagan Washington National Airports.
BUSINESS
October 16, 2015 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
Delta Air Lines said Wednesday that its refinery in Trainer, Delaware County, posted a $106 million profit in the third quarter, compared with $19 million a year ago. "Our total fuel expense declined by over $1 billion in the quarter as lower market fuel prices more than offset higher consumption," chief financial officer Paul Jacobson said in a conference call on the company's earnings. Lower crude-oil costs and increased production helped boost the refinery's profit, Jacobson said.
BUSINESS
August 10, 2015 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia has long wanted a direct flight to the Asia Pacific region. A survey of business travelers here in 2012 found the top desired international business destinations were Tokyo, Shanghai, Beijing and Mumbai, India. Philadelphia already has a lot of international service to Europe, Mexico, the Caribbean, and the Middle East. But attracting a nonstop flight to China, Japan, Hong Kong, or Korea has proven difficult. "We are the largest metropolitan area in the United States without direct nonstop service tothe Asia Pacific," Philadelphia International Airport CEO Mark Gale saidin a recent interview.
BUSINESS
March 13, 1987 | By KEVIN HANEY, Daily News Staff Writer
Philadelphia - Get To Know Us, so the slogan goes. But bring a fat wallet, if you believe the results of a corporate travel survey done by the accounting firm of Laventhol & Horwath, which is based here. The total cost of a business person's stay in the Philadelphia area averaged $206.50 a day last year, the fourth highest in the nation. That's 11 percent higher than the $185.77 it cost in 1985 for a one-day stay here, according to the firm's calculations. Bjorn Hanson, a partner in the Laventhol firm, said the high cost reflected demand in large cities and their typically higher prices for things such as labor and real estate.
BUSINESS
April 15, 1991 | By Tom Belden, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the same way the U.S. airline industry is being whittled down to just a half-dozen major carriers and a few good-size regional players, the travel- agency business also is changing. Most vacation planning and a lot of business travel for small and medium- size companies is done by thousands of mom-and-pop travel agencies staffed by half a dozen or fewer employees and flourishing in small towns. But increasingly, major corporations are turning to a handful of big agencies, at which they are consolidating all travel management.
BUSINESS
January 6, 1998 | By Tom Belden, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
An outspoken advocate for companies trying to lower their air-travel costs announced yesterday that he's abandoning the role he has played as what one supporter called "the Ralph Nader of corporate travel. " Kevin P. Mitchell, a former Cigna Corp. executive, collected backing from 17 big companies in 1994 to form Business Travel Contractors Corp. and used the group to urge airlines to work more closely with their corporate customers to reduce prices. The group, from a small office in Lafayette Hill, eventually grew to more than 40 companies - including household names such as Bell Atlantic, Cigna, Chrysler and Procter & Gamble - that buy more than $1 billion in airline tickets annually.
NEWS
May 3, 2006 | By Carrie Budoff INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Speaking from the Senate floor, U.S. Sen. Rick Santorum (R., Pa.) urged his colleagues to curtail a popular perk: private corporate-sponsored flights at bargain rates for members of Congress. "This is clearly a subsidy," he said March 8. Two days earlier, he had taken a BellSouth plane from a runway near his home in Leesburg, Va., to fund-raising events in North Carolina and South Carolina. The jet ferried Santorum, two aides and Ward White, BellSouth's top Washington lobbyist.
BUSINESS
June 14, 2005 | By Tom Belden INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Many business travelers are willing to be fingerprinted and submit other information about themselves to the federal government if it means speeding up the airport security process, according to a survey released yesterday by the Business Travel Coalition of Radnor. The online survey, initially sent to about 2,000 members of the advocacy group, found that 77 percent of the 651 who responded would support a "registered traveler" program, if it meant shorter waits and more consistent security checks from one airport to another.
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