CollectionsCorporate Travel
IN THE NEWS

Corporate Travel

BUSINESS
August 9, 2006 | By Akweli Parker INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Philadelphia-based StarCite Inc. and Santa Clara, Calif., company OnVantage Inc. planned to announce today a merger of their two Web-based meetings-management firms. Officials with the two companies did not disclose terms of the transaction, but said no cash or stock would change hands in the "merger of equals. " The combined company, which will keep the StarCite name, will have about 350 employees, and its headquarters will be in Philadelphia. Among other services, the companies use Web-based automation to remove much of the grunt work from making corporate travel and meeting plans.
BUSINESS
April 30, 2014 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
Virgin America, California's hip and high-tech airline, is pulling its flights from Philadelphia to Los Angeles and San Francisco, and flying the airplanes instead to more lucrative corporate travel markets - between Dallas and New York City and Washington. The airline began Philadelphia flights two years ago. It said the service will end Oct. 6. The Burlingame, Calif., carrier said Friday that it had been awarded two gates at Dallas' Love Field by the Justice Department and planned to begin flights in October to New York LaGuardia and Reagan Washington National Airports.
BUSINESS
March 13, 1987 | By KEVIN HANEY, Daily News Staff Writer
Philadelphia - Get To Know Us, so the slogan goes. But bring a fat wallet, if you believe the results of a corporate travel survey done by the accounting firm of Laventhol & Horwath, which is based here. The total cost of a business person's stay in the Philadelphia area averaged $206.50 a day last year, the fourth highest in the nation. That's 11 percent higher than the $185.77 it cost in 1985 for a one-day stay here, according to the firm's calculations. Bjorn Hanson, a partner in the Laventhol firm, said the high cost reflected demand in large cities and their typically higher prices for things such as labor and real estate.
BUSINESS
April 15, 1991 | By Tom Belden, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the same way the U.S. airline industry is being whittled down to just a half-dozen major carriers and a few good-size regional players, the travel- agency business also is changing. Most vacation planning and a lot of business travel for small and medium- size companies is done by thousands of mom-and-pop travel agencies staffed by half a dozen or fewer employees and flourishing in small towns. But increasingly, major corporations are turning to a handful of big agencies, at which they are consolidating all travel management.
BUSINESS
January 6, 1998 | By Tom Belden, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
An outspoken advocate for companies trying to lower their air-travel costs announced yesterday that he's abandoning the role he has played as what one supporter called "the Ralph Nader of corporate travel. " Kevin P. Mitchell, a former Cigna Corp. executive, collected backing from 17 big companies in 1994 to form Business Travel Contractors Corp. and used the group to urge airlines to work more closely with their corporate customers to reduce prices. The group, from a small office in Lafayette Hill, eventually grew to more than 40 companies - including household names such as Bell Atlantic, Cigna, Chrysler and Procter & Gamble - that buy more than $1 billion in airline tickets annually.
NEWS
May 3, 2006 | By Carrie Budoff INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Speaking from the Senate floor, U.S. Sen. Rick Santorum (R., Pa.) urged his colleagues to curtail a popular perk: private corporate-sponsored flights at bargain rates for members of Congress. "This is clearly a subsidy," he said March 8. Two days earlier, he had taken a BellSouth plane from a runway near his home in Leesburg, Va., to fund-raising events in North Carolina and South Carolina. The jet ferried Santorum, two aides and Ward White, BellSouth's top Washington lobbyist.
BUSINESS
June 14, 2005 | By Tom Belden INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Many business travelers are willing to be fingerprinted and submit other information about themselves to the federal government if it means speeding up the airport security process, according to a survey released yesterday by the Business Travel Coalition of Radnor. The online survey, initially sent to about 2,000 members of the advocacy group, found that 77 percent of the 651 who responded would support a "registered traveler" program, if it meant shorter waits and more consistent security checks from one airport to another.
BUSINESS
November 4, 1991 | By Tom Belden, Inquirer Staff Writer
Business travel on airlines will be down substantially for all of 1991, but it has been growing modestly this fall. American Express Co., among others, said its commercial business was up about 8 percent in September from the same month a year ago. The rekindling of activity was enough to prompt most of the major airlines, including American, Delta and United, to tack 6 percent increases on some of its seven-day advance-purchase air fares,...
BUSINESS
May 31, 1993 | By Tom Belden, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Business travelers use discounted airline tickets whenever they can. Many are even willing to stay away from home on a Saturday night in order to qualify for the lowest fares. For the most part, however, those who must travel on business naturally want to be home for the weekend, and companies understand that they therefore must pay top dollar for airline tickets. But apparently, there are a huge number of U.S. companies that, faced with paying $1,300 for a full-fare roundtrip coast-to-coast ticket, routinely bend the airlines' rules to get a cheaper fare.
BUSINESS
December 16, 1991 | By Tom Belden, Inquirer Staff Writer
Going global is a popular phrase, with companies around the world trying to broaden their international presence in preparation for the single markets being created in Europe and North America. The travel business has always had strong international components, of course, including a handful of travel agencies that operate in more than one country. These days, the biggest U.S. airlines are moving to become major international carriers as well. As globalization of travel builds, some of the hottest topics for some major multinational companies are new ones: how to save money on overseas travel costs and how to make traveling abroad as seamless as possible for employees.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|