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Corporate Welfare

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NEWS
July 14, 1995 | by John R. Kasich, New York Times
Not since Neil Armstrong walked on the moon in 1969 has the federal budget been in balance. Inertia propelled Apollo 11 through space to the moon. The federal budget is similarly subject to the forces of nature. Once set in motion, government programs tend to keep on going, regardless of utility, fairness or importance. Achieving a balanced budget by the year 2002 depends on an unyielding commitment to scrutinize each program every year. Once Washington creates a program, debate focuses on how much more money it should get, not whether it should exist.
NEWS
November 29, 1994 | BY MOLLY IVINS
Labor Secretary Robert Reich touched off an instant firestorm by proposing that in addition to reforming welfare for poor people, we take a look at corporate welfare and consider cutting some of that out, too. Jerry Jasinowski, president of the National Association of Manufacturers, was almost stuttering with indignation. How dare Reich call tax subsidies "corporate welfare"? How dare he? Rush Limbaugh, always to be counted on to advance intelligent debate, riposted that Reich is short, short, short.
NEWS
March 14, 1995 | BY TONY SNOW
No person is more annoying or intriguing than a sometimes-principled politician. Sen. Mark Hatfield, R-Ore., enraged fellow Senate Republicans when he cast the deciding vote against the balanced-budget amendment. Although he backed a different version of the amendment of 1982, he op posed this year's proposal so vehemently that he vowed to resign his Senate seat rather than toe the party line. A few GOP members wanted to punish the meddlesome Oregonian by bumping him from his chairmanship of the appropriations committee.
NEWS
April 27, 2016
Nathan Benefield is vice president of policy for the Commonwealth Foundation Conservatives loathe government handouts. Liberals denounce special favors to corporations. One thing can unify these two sides: ending Pennsylvania's budget-busting corporate-welfare handouts. Every year, state government gives millions in taxpayer dollars to favored businesses under the guise of "economic development. " In reality, these giveaways represent political development, enriching special interests and their well-connected lobbyists.
NEWS
May 24, 1995 | BY DAVID S. BRODER
Now that President Clinton and his aides have finally signaled their willingness to negotiate with congressional Republicans on the fiscal 1996 budget, the stage is set for needed action to reduce the deficit and establish priorities for federal spending. An important part of that process will be to slice the wasteful business subsidies that make up what has been called "corporate welfare. " Neither the original Clinton budget, submitted last winter, nor the House and Senate Republican budget now being enacted does an adequate job of curbing this spending.
NEWS
June 7, 2012 | Daily News Editorial
IT'S WELL-KNOWN to most by now that Gov. Corbett doesn't much like welfare programs. His recent initiative to deny food stamps to anyone with assets exceeding $5,500, the banishment of about 90,000 kids from the Medicaid rolls, and the elimination of cash-assistance grants for the disabled and others are among recent moves that makes his position clear.   There is an exception to his aversion to welfare, though: If you're a corporation, you can get plenty of state aid, and you won't be subjected to any kind of means test.
NEWS
February 26, 1999 | by Ralph Nader
What do you think of this idea? That April 15 each year be designated Taxpayer Appreciation Day so that all those corporations receiving taxpayer subsidies, giveaways, bailouts and other forms of corporate welfare can be asked to express their thanks at various public events. More than most taxpayers are ever told, our economy, corporate profits, urban renewals, scientific advances and many of the newer industries have come from taxpayer-financed programs whose fruits are given away to (mostly)
NEWS
July 19, 2004 | By Steve Chapman
Eight years ago, Congress and Bill Clinton agreed to do something the president had promised to do - "end welfare as we know it. " But that was for poor people who had grown too dependent on the dole. When it comes to corporations accustomed to public aid, though, we've carefully preserved welfare as we know it. Corporate welfare - an array of direct subsidies, tax breaks and indirect assistance created for the special benefit of businesses - is one of those things that politicians would rather criticize than abolish.
BUSINESS
January 25, 2011 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Commonwealth Foundation , backed by the Mellon Scaifes , the McKennas of Kennametal Inc. , and other wealthy donors with a lot at stake, have sent Gov. Corbett a conservative wish list of ways to cut state spending. It may offend almost as many entrenched Republicans as Democrats. Some highlights: Eliminate corporate welfare by prohibiting the state from giving tax dollars to private companies. That means killing the Redevelopment Assistance Capital Program (RACP)
NEWS
November 23, 1994 | By Robert A. Rankin, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU This article includes information from Reuters
Labor Secretary Robert B. Reich declared war on "corporate welfare" yesterday, calling for cancellation of more than $100 billion in special tax breaks for big industries. "Since we are committed to moving the disadvantaged from welfare to work," Reich said, "why not target corporate welfare, as well, and use the savings to help all Americans get better work?" Reich's remarks signaled how the Clinton administration is positioning itself to cope with the politics and policy challenges of the Republican landslide.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 26, 2016 | By Dana Milbank
A generation after Ronald Reagan denounced the "welfare queen," the Grand Old Party is evidently on the verge of nominating its first welfare king. Four years ago last week, the party's 2012 presidential nominee, Mitt Romney, famously wrote off the 47 percent of Americans who don't pay federal income taxes. Romney, secretly recorded at a fund-raiser, said the 47 percent "who are dependent upon government" won't vote for him because "I'll never convince them that they should take personal responsibility and care for their lives.
NEWS
April 27, 2016
Nathan Benefield is vice president of policy for the Commonwealth Foundation Conservatives loathe government handouts. Liberals denounce special favors to corporations. One thing can unify these two sides: ending Pennsylvania's budget-busting corporate-welfare handouts. Every year, state government gives millions in taxpayer dollars to favored businesses under the guise of "economic development. " In reality, these giveaways represent political development, enriching special interests and their well-connected lobbyists.
NEWS
July 22, 2014
AS LAWMAKERS in Washington haggle over the future of the U.S. Export-Import Bank, Michael Strange has no doubts about where he stands. Strange is owner and president of Bassetts Ice Cream, which has about 25 employees at its Center City headquarters. Exports, mostly to China, account for 20 percent of Bassetts' annual revenue. Ex-Im is an obscure federal agency that helps American businesses, mostly small, sell goods abroad. But some lawmakers - primarily tea party Republicans in the House - want to close down Ex-Im when its authorization ends Sept.
NEWS
August 8, 2013
AS CIVIL unrest goes, the United States isn't exactly becoming France, where it seems at least one group of workers goes on strike on a weekly basis. But a recent series of one-day strikes by fast-food workers in several cities around the United States protesting low wages should be considered a dramatic development in our labor history. It's also a timely one. The workers' actions have renewed focus on raising the $7.25-per-hour minimum wage, though the median pay for fast-food workers is $9.05.
NEWS
September 23, 2012
You know the 47 percent Gov. Romney's latest gaffe reveals him as a sneering, self-satisfied plutocrat ("Romney faces fallout from video," Wednesday). Born with a silver spoon in his mouth, Romney doesn't know the "47 percent. " But you do, and so do I. They are disabled vets, wounded heroes barely making ends meet on government benefits. My wife's Aunt Sue, who came from Italy to this country, worked hard, and later struggled to survive on Social Security and her meager pension and savings.
NEWS
June 7, 2012 | Daily News Editorial
IT'S WELL-KNOWN to most by now that Gov. Corbett doesn't much like welfare programs. His recent initiative to deny food stamps to anyone with assets exceeding $5,500, the banishment of about 90,000 kids from the Medicaid rolls, and the elimination of cash-assistance grants for the disabled and others are among recent moves that makes his position clear.   There is an exception to his aversion to welfare, though: If you're a corporation, you can get plenty of state aid, and you won't be subjected to any kind of means test.
NEWS
January 27, 2012
NOW THAT we've learned that the Corbett administration is considering that applicants for food-stamp assistance undergo asset examinations and meet strict financial criteria to receive it, I suggest that the governor think of applying that standard to other recipients of state welfare. He could start with the corporations that benefitted from his generous tax break last year. Could they prove a need for it? How many jobs did their bonus create? Should those corporations be allowed to have no more than $2,000 in savings to get their welfare from the state?
BUSINESS
January 25, 2011 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Commonwealth Foundation , backed by the Mellon Scaifes , the McKennas of Kennametal Inc. , and other wealthy donors with a lot at stake, have sent Gov. Corbett a conservative wish list of ways to cut state spending. It may offend almost as many entrenched Republicans as Democrats. Some highlights: Eliminate corporate welfare by prohibiting the state from giving tax dollars to private companies. That means killing the Redevelopment Assistance Capital Program (RACP)
NEWS
January 9, 2011 | By Paul Davies, Inquirer Columnist
It's no surprise that even after a Norwegian shipbuilder was given hundreds of millions of dollars in taxpayer subsidies to come to the Navy Yard in the late 1990s, the yard is in danger of closing. That's because the deal never made good economic sense - at least from the taxpayers' standpoint. And taxpayers were the ones underwriting this corporate welfare. For those who missed the New Year's Eve report, the Aker Philadelphia Shipyard is threatening to close if it doesn't get an additional $42 million in state funding.
NEWS
December 27, 2005
Michael Crane's letter of Dec. 21 asks "Can someone, anyone . . . please show me where in the Constitution does it say that the president has the authority to do whatever he wants regardless of the law?" Let's look inward. This is a federal government that has gone far beyond the scope of power envisioned by our Founding Fathers. Madison, Jefferson and the rest would not recognize the nanny state that exists today as the nation of liberty and freedom from government intrusion they left us. Income taxes, Social Security, Medicare, corporate welfare gone mad, and literally thousands of other unconstitutional programs would make this nation unrecognizable to our founders.
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