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NEWS
June 28, 1992 | By Sharon O'Neal, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Charlestown Township has struck a deal that will provide training grounds for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and will ultimately yield two new soccer fields for the Phoenixville Area Soccer Club. The idea is simple enough: The Corps will build the fields as part of its two-week summer camp exercises in August at the township-owned Charlestown Park, then turn them over to the soccer club. The club leases space from the township at the park and already has two soccer fields there.
NEWS
August 1, 1993 | By Bill Frischling, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The Narberth Ambulance Corps' temporary home was delivered in two pieces last week to a lot next to its old home near Narberth borough hall. For the next 12 to 18 months, the corps, which serves Narberth and Lower Merion, will operate from two prefabricated buildings. The ambulances will be kept in a paved lot next to the temporary offices. "Our feeling is that there should be zero interruptions of service," said Bruce E. Tribken, executive director of the corps. The corps' current building is scheduled to be demolished when renovation of the borough hall begins.
NEWS
June 26, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ruth Muscal, 79, of Penn Valley, an accomplished Israeli citizen who spent much of her adult life here, died Thursday, June 11, in Tel Aviv. She had long been ill with dementia. Mrs. Muscal was the wife of Zvi Muscal, and the couple arrived to Philadelphia in 1979 when he was in charge of establishing a branch of Bank HaPoalim here. The Muscals fell in love with the city, and he founded First Executive Bank, then on Walnut Street. Several years ago, the Muscals returned to Tel Aviv.
NEWS
September 25, 1995 | YONG KIM/ DAILY NEWS
The high-steppers were kickin' it during the Drum and Drill Team Review at Penn's Landing on Saturday. The Daily-News-sponsored event featured 24 units from just about every 'hood in Philly, performing precision step drills to the accompaniment of their drum corps. The event, at the Grand Plaza, also included an audience participation workshop.
NEWS
January 13, 2013
Web prodigy found dead NEW YORK - A cofounder of Reddit who fought to make online content free to the public has been found dead, authorities confirmed Saturday. Aaron Swartz, 26, hanged himself in his Brooklyn apartment weeks before he was to go on trial for allegedly stealing millions of journal articles from an electronic archive in an attempt to make them freely available. Swartz was a prodigy who as a young teenager helped create RSS, a family of Web feed formats used to gather updates from blogs, news headlines, audio, and video for users.
NEWS
August 26, 1993 | By Josh Zimmer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Dredging made Hawk Island what it is today - a nearly 400-acre tract of abundant nature that some people in this little river town consider a local treasure. It began in the 1950s. Silt from dredging operations in the Delaware was deposited on a small island between the river and the Rancocas Creek, eventually bonding the island with the mainland, creating a peninsula. Over time, the area developed into a home for a variety of small wildlife - rabbits, raccoons and many birds - some deer and some very lush vegetation.
SPORTS
November 13, 2011 | By Phil Anastasia, Inquirer Staff Writer
Many football games are won in the trenches. This one could be won in the air. Pennsauken and Atlantic City might have the two best receiving corps in South Jersey. They will square off Saturday when the eighth-seeded Vikings (6-2) visit the top-seeded Indians (7-1) in an intriguing opening-round game of the South Jersey Group 4 tournament. "We look forward to these types of games," Pennsauken coach Clinton Tabb said of the potentially wide-open nature of the game that matches the No. 4 (Pennsauken)
NEWS
November 11, 2011 | By Phil Anastasia, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Many football games are won in the trenches. This one could be won in the air. Pennsauken and Atlantic City might have the two best receiving corps in South Jersey. They will square off Saturday when the eighth-seeded Vikings (6-2) visit the top-seeded Indians (7-1) in an intriguing opening-round game of the South Jersey Group 4 tournament. "We look forward to these types of games," Pennsauken coach Clinton Tabb said of the potentially wide-open nature of the game that matches the No. 4 (Pennsauken)
NEWS
May 25, 2011 | By Anthony R. Wood, Inquirer Staff Writer
For a generation, they have been the targets of budget-cutters, but this year the federal government plans to spend $148 million on shore-protection projects - believed to be a record amount. About $40 million of that would go toward beach projects in South Jersey from Long Beach Island to Cape May, according to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, which released its spending plan last week. "I was surprised," said Howard Marlowe, the nation's most prominent coastal lobbyist. He said it would be the biggest annual expenditure since he started keeping track in 1995, and available federal records indicate no greater amounts in prior years.
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SPORTS
September 9, 2016 | By Marcus Hayes, STAFF WRITER
How did we reach this startling point? How did the Eagles suddenly find themselves flush with wide receiver talent? Just four months ago the Birds were hoping to prove the NFL wrong about Rueben Randle and Chris Givens. On Saturday, they still lacked a No. 1 receiver, but that's OK. They shed Randle and Givens because they knew first-round holdover Nelson Agholor and newcomer Dorial Green-Beckham would be on the front line with slot ace Jordan Matthews, and that Josh Huff (!)
SPORTS
August 24, 2016 | Paul Domowitch, Daily News Columnist
JOE WALKER was everything you want in a salary-cap era backup. Not only was he proving to be a pretty good player, but he also came cheap. He was a seventh-round rookie with a $465,034 cap number this season. But Walker tore the ACL in his left knee last Thursday against the Pittsburgh Steelers, and an Eagles linebacker unit that already had very little depth didn't even have that. And that's how the Eagles found themselves having to give a one-year, $3 million contract with $1.75 million in guaranteed money to 31-year-old middle linebacker Stephen Tulloch.
SPORTS
August 5, 2016 | By David Murphy, Daily News Columnist
TRAINING CAMP'S entrails are a difficult read. For every player who makes a play, there's a defender who allowed him to make it, and both play for the team whose fortunes we're attempting to predict. Case in point: After Wednesday's practice session, a reporter mentioned to Doug Pederson that Trey Burton seemed to be making a lot of plays out there, and Pederson agreed. Your first thought: Hey, maybe this kid's coming into his own. Your second thought: What if he isn't? And what happens when the defense that couldn't cover Trey Burton is trying to cover Jordan Reed?
BUSINESS
July 5, 2016
Securities trades recently reported to the Securities and Exchange Commission by officers, directors, and principal shareholders of corporations based or having sizable employment in the Philadelphia area. Titles are as reported to the SEC. Brandywine Realty Trust Gerard H. Sweeney , chief executive officer, sold 60,000 shares at $15.74 on June 27, and now directly holds 1,143,231 shares. Chesapeake Utilities Corp. John R. Schimkaitis , board chairman, sold 500 shares at $63.03 on June 27, and now directly holds 146,099 shares.
TRAVEL
July 4, 2016 | By Katherine Wzorek, For The Inquirer
Here I was - mid-December 2013 - climbing up one of Nicaragua's tallest volcanoes. It was about 7 o'clock in the morning, and I was already a few hundred meters and a few hours into the climb. I took a minute to catch my breath and look around me - I was surrounded by black, volcanic gravel, and I was standing on a 70-degree incline. I knew that I had a few more hours to go before reaching the top. Even though it was December, I was covered head to toe with sweat. The temperatures were continuing to rise and would reach their peak of a simmering 100 degrees in just a few hours.
NEWS
May 30, 2016 | By Kevin Riordan, Columnist
Maureen McLoone, drum major during the glory years of the Royaleers, last marched down Kings Highway in 1968. But she'll lead the formation once again Monday as former members of Haddonfield's pioneering all-girl drum and bugle corps, many of them grandmothers now, reassemble for the borough's Memorial Day parade. From 1954 until 1977, the Royaleers - originally called the Christ the King Cadets, later the Royaleer Mounties - were a parade fixture in the borough and beyond. The 100-strong, precision-drilled, spit-and-polish group took home regional and national trophies and exemplified the community's patriotism and pride.
BUSINESS
May 14, 2016 | By Jacob Adelman, Staff Writer
FMC Corp. plans to move this weekend into its still-under-construction University City headquarters tower, among the most prominent of the recent building projects that are reshaping the city's skyline. The chemicals giant will be the first tenant in the glass tower that will bear its name near 30th Street Station, where it is to occupy 250,000 square feet over nine floors, communications chief Ken Gedaka said in an interview on Thursday. The move was timed to beat the expiration of its lease at its current home, the BNY Mellon Center tower at 1735 Market St., which it had occupied since 1991.
BUSINESS
April 13, 2016 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, STAFF WRITER
An organization that defines its mission as serving businesses that believe that business is a force for good said that unless North Carolina changes its law requiring people to use public bathrooms based on the sex on their birth certificates rather than that which with they identify, it will move its annual conference, scheduled for October in North Carolina, out of the state. Founded by Jay Coen Gilbert, Bart Houlahan and Andrew Kassoy, B Lab, with offices in Wayne, certifies companies as "B Corps," based on their meeting environmental, social and other standards.
BUSINESS
March 26, 2016 | By Jacob Adelman, Staff Writer
Parkway Corp. has carved its development niche amassing Center City property, banking it as paid parking, then building it up when the time is right. But it's trying something new at the former car-rental lot it owns at 20th and Arch Streets, which it is now looking to sell as undeveloped land. "It is a little bit of a different thing from our strategy," Parkway president Robert Zuritsky said of its move to market the former Avis Rent a Car System L.L.C. lot it acquired just over a year ago. "We're just exploring to see what the market is. " The shift comes amid concerns that Center City's rising real estate values may be losing some momentum.
BUSINESS
November 1, 2015 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
KeyCorp, the No. 13 U.S. bank, said Friday that it would pay $4.1 billion, or $11.40 in cash and stock, for Buffalo, N.Y.-based First Niagara Bank and its nearly 400 branches, including 58 in eastern Pennsylvania. KeyCorp, the Cleveland-based owner of Key Bank, hopes to cut $400 million from First Niagara's $1 billion in annual expenses. In a conference call, KeyCorp chairman and CEO Beth Mooney told investors that 120 of First Niagara's 400 branches (many in Upstate New York)
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