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NEWS
April 13, 2015 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
Burlington County has violated a New Jersey law that prohibits strip searches in minor-offense cases unless there is a reasonable suspicion that weapons, drugs, or other contraband are being concealed, a federal judge decided last month in a case filed seven years ago, before the U.S. Supreme Court weighed in on the issue. Now, more than 10,000 detainees who were strip-searched at Burlington's jails over the years - despite minor offenses such as failure to pay traffic fines or child support - are expected to be certified as a class and may qualify for damages that could total millions.
NEWS
December 1, 1989 | By Emilie Lounsberry, Inquirer Staff Writer
Twenty-seven inmates who were at Holmesburg Prison during a disturbance in October filed a lawsuit yesterday in U.S. District Court, contending that they were beaten without cause and have suffered extensive psychological and physical injuries. Named as defendants in the lawsuit were the city and 100 unidentified corrections officers and supervisors at the Northeast Philadelphia prison. The suit, filed by lawyers Richard A. Shore and Howard D. Popper, contended that the inmates were denied medical treatment for "many hours" after they were injured and that, for most of the 27 inmates, treatment amounted to "little more than first aid. " The suit states that the group was incarcerated in I-block, which was the site of the disturbance Oct. 28, which began after a quarrel between a guard and an inmate.
NEWS
October 29, 1998 | By Eddie Olsen, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A onetime cell-mate lover testified yesterday there was no warning that Steven Beverly had reached the breaking point or would go after the corrections officer who ordered their separation at Bayside State Prison in Maurice River Township last year. Favors Ali, a former inmate at the Cumberland County facility who is now in protective custody at Trenton State Prison, alleged that he and Beverly lived in an atmosphere that was biased against blacks and homosexuals at Bayside State Prison.
NEWS
November 6, 1989 | By Robert J. Terry, Inquirer Staff Writer Inquirer staff writer Amy S. Rosenberg contributed to this article
At least 12 inmates will be charged with assault and riot in the Oct. 28 Holmesburg Prison uprising that injured 114 inmates and 47 corrections officers, a police source said yesterday. In addition, the source said, corrections officers have identified four other inmates who took part in a fight earlier the same day in which five officers were injured. Detectives have interviewed 15 corrections officers and plan to interview 30 more, according to the source. They expect additional inmates to be identified as participants in the rioting.
NEWS
December 23, 2009 | By James Osborne INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Corrections officers from the downtown Camden jail filed a defamation lawsuit against top county officials yesterday over accusations that officers had vandalized officials' personal property in retaliation for the decision to privatize the jail. "As elected officials, they shouldn't be making allegations without evidence," said Peter Farlow, spokesman for Policemen's Benevolent Association Local 351. "It diminishes our capacity to act as law enforcement officials. " The suit was filed in Camden County Superior Court against Freeholder Director Louis Cappelli Jr. and County Administrator Ross Angilella.
NEWS
May 28, 2013
Roy Pinto, president of the union for Pennsylvania corrections officers, was incorrectly identified in an article in Monday's Inquirer. The Inquirer wants its news report to be fair and correct in every respect, and regrets when it is not. If you have a question or comment about news coverage, contact assistant managing editor David Sullivan (215-854-2357) at The Inquirer, Box 8263, Philadelphia 19101, or e-mail dsullivan@phillynews.com .
NEWS
August 24, 1989 | By Karl Stark, Inquirer Staff Writer
Bucks County owes corrections officers a 10 percent raise this year and 5 percent next year, according to an arbitrator's ruling. The arbitrator also let stand a county policy allowing officers to refuse overtime if they have worked mandatory overtime the previous day. Overcrowding has forced officers at the Bucks County Correctional Facility to work increasingly long hours. Eight of the top 10 overtime earners in the county work at the county jail or the rehabilitation center.
NEWS
March 28, 2013 | By Robert Moran, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A fired Delaware County corrections officer filed a complaint Wednesday with the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission alleging rampant racism and illegal conduct at the George W. Hill Correctional Facility in Glen Mills. Victor McWilliams alleges in his nine-page complaint that the percentage of black corrections officers at the prison had plunged from about 90 percent in 2002 to less than 30 percent in 2012. "This statistical anomaly cannot be ignored for an employer of this size," the complaint states.
NEWS
April 4, 1990 | By Robert W. Fowler, Inquirer Staff Writer Inquirer staff writer Donna Shaw contributed to this article
Workers at Graterford Prison asked Commonwealth Court yesterday to force the state to reduce the number of inmates at the vastly overcrowded maximum security facility and to hire more corrections officers. "Such conditions have already resulted in a doubling of inmate assaults on the staff," contends the suit filed on behalf of Council 13 of the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees. The suit, filed against the governor and the state Department of Corrections, contends that there are 4,200 inmates at an institution that is rated to hold 2,734.
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NEWS
April 13, 2015 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
Burlington County has violated a New Jersey law that prohibits strip searches in minor-offense cases unless there is a reasonable suspicion that weapons, drugs, or other contraband are being concealed, a federal judge decided last month in a case filed seven years ago, before the U.S. Supreme Court weighed in on the issue. Now, more than 10,000 detainees who were strip-searched at Burlington's jails over the years - despite minor offenses such as failure to pay traffic fines or child support - are expected to be certified as a class and may qualify for damages that could total millions.
NEWS
February 14, 2015 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
TRENTON - A New Jersey lawmaker wants to restrict the use of solitary confinement in the state's jails, warning the practice has "grave consequences" for the safety of inmates and officers. There's just one problem: The Department of Corrections and the unions representing officers say they don't use solitary confinement. A disagreement over semantics dominated an hours-long hearing Thursday held by the Senate Law and Public Safety Committee, which took testimony on the bill but did not vote on it. The bill, sponsored by Sen. Raymond J. Lesniak (D., Union)
NEWS
June 25, 2014 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Last of three parts During visiting time at the State Correctional Institution at Waymart, Pa., the wives and mothers who have been allowed into the prison nimbly feed money into vending machines that line a wall. The women quickly amass meals of fat and calories to present to their men during their four hours together. Along with their freedom, the inmates have lost the privilege of handling legal tender. Prisoners eat sitting side by side with women and children on hard, fixed chairs.
NEWS
April 3, 2014 | By Ronnie Polaneczky, Daily News Columnist
I APOLOGIZE to the corrections officers and supervisors who felt tainted by yesterday's story about Michael "Fat Mike" Davis, who died after an incident at the Philadelphia Detention Center. "The article made us all look like animals," said one of the prison employees who had spoken with my colleague Dana DiFilippo and me about inmate Davis, on the condition of anonymity. They said that Davis had been dragged, facedown, to the Detention Center's psych unit, suffering injuries that his family believes contributed to his death.
NEWS
May 28, 2013
Roy Pinto, president of the union for Pennsylvania corrections officers, was incorrectly identified in an article in Monday's Inquirer. The Inquirer wants its news report to be fair and correct in every respect, and regrets when it is not. If you have a question or comment about news coverage, contact assistant managing editor David Sullivan (215-854-2357) at The Inquirer, Box 8263, Philadelphia 19101, or e-mail dsullivan@phillynews.com .
NEWS
April 26, 2013 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Gloucester County is expanding its plan to outsource its entire inmate population beyond South Jersey. Some inmates could be shipped to the Essex County jail in Newark - about 90 miles northeast of the jail in Woodbury. The county Board of Freeholders voted unanimously Wednesday to enter into contracts with Cumberland, Salem, Burlington, and Essex Counties, to which Gloucester would ship its 270 adult male inmates starting June 1 at $100 an inmate. The controversial move drew scrutiny from Gloucester County corrections officers and beleaguered public defenders.
NEWS
March 29, 2013 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
A fired Delaware County corrections officer filed a complaint Wednesday with the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission alleging rampant racism and illegal conduct at the George W. Hill Correctional Facility in Glen Mills. Victor McWilliams alleges in his nine-page complaint that the percentage of black corrections officers at the prison had plunged from about 90 percent in 2002 to less than 30 percent in 2012. "This statistical anomaly cannot be ignored for an employer of this size," the complaint states.
NEWS
March 26, 2013 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Gloucester County plan to outsource its adult male inmate population to other counties - making it the only county in New Jersey without its own jail - has come under fire from public defenders who say they can't possibly provide adequate representation to clients housed in jails an hour or more away. The lawyers, like the Gloucester County corrections officers whose jobs are in limbo, say the plan was hatched in secrecy by the freeholder board without consulting them. The ACLU says the plan also violates moral and practical imperatives to keep inmates close to their families.
NEWS
September 21, 2012 | By Sean Carlin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Officer Montess Trapp of the Upper Darby Police Department didn't think about what could happen to him as he raced into a burning home while on patrol five months ago. As Trapp arrived at the fire scene in April, the sound of a little girl screaming triggered his "instincts as a parent, instincts as a human," compelling him to run into the smoke-filled house on the 3800 block of Marshall Road and save the 4-year-old. Trapp and Officer Kelly Seace, who joined in the rescue, were among 45 police officers, firefighters, and corrections officers honored Thursday evening at the Awards of Valor Ceremony at the National Liberty Museum in Old City.
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