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Corruption

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NEWS
January 30, 2011 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
If you want to understand the Egyptian uprising and how U.S. officials should respond, let me take you back to the pro-democracy demonstrations I witnessed in Cairo in 2005. Middle-class protesters went to the streets then, too, demanding free elections. But the government of President Hosni Mubarak - tarring all opposition as radical Islamists - surrounded them with police in Darth Vader helmets and shields. I spoke with professional women who had been beaten and groped by police, and with young women journalists whom security agents had threatened to jail on prostitution charges.
NEWS
March 2, 2000 | Daily News Wire Services
A six-month investigation into corruption and violence within the Los Angeles Police Department has found that rogue officers engaged in illegal activities that included stealing cocaine, shooting unarmed suspects, and planting and rearranging evidence at crime scenes to secure convictions and cover up mistakes. The internal report, issued yesterday, said the very "culture" of some parts of the department, notably the Rampart division, which polices central and east Los Angeles, excused and even encouraged the abuses.
NEWS
March 31, 2011 | By BEN WAXMAN
OVER the last decade, we've heard a steady drumbeat of stories about corruption in local government. We heard about Mayor Street's treasurer, Corey Kemp, who traded contracts for sports tickets and a new deck. Then there was Rick Mariano, the city councilman who sold his office to pay credit-card bills. Besides these high-profile cases, there's the steady drip-drip-drip of employee theft and infractions. Just last year, for example, an employee in the Records Department was busted for selling more than 20,000 documents on the side, depriving the city of $600,000 in legitimate fees.
NEWS
May 2, 1986 | By MICHAEL DAYS, Daily News Staff Writer
Vowing that his adminstration wouldn't "tolerate abuse and corruption in any department," Mayor Goode announced yesterday that he had established a committee to improve the city's financial transactions and accounting procedures. "One message that I want to send through loud and clear," Goode said, "is that we're going to really go on a search-and-destroy mission in this government. " Three recently completed reports by a private accounting firm commissioned by Goode had found serious managerial problems with the city's Licenses and Inspections and Streets departments, and with the Minority Business Enterprise Council.
NEWS
May 3, 1996 | by Dave Racher, Daily News Staff Writer
Former Housing Authority Police Officer Eduardo Malverio pleaded no contest to faking drug arrests a few weeks ago, and decided to try to help the prosecution nail his ex-partner, Ricardo Leon. It didn't work. Yesterday, Common Pleas Judge Gregory E. Smith said Malverio had changed his story too many times, so he acquitted Leon, 27, of 24 charges of corruption. Defense lawyer Jeremy H. G. Ibrahim punched holes in Malverio's story and attacked the credibility of two men and two women who contended that the two cops planted drugs on them.
NEWS
April 20, 1989 | Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
Proponents of ethics in government seemed to have found the perfect spot for their sign: the Rotunda of the state Capitol. Thousands of people would go by the spot, particularly state senators, who must vote for a new Ethics Act by June 30 in order to save the life of the Ethics Commission. What better way to capture their attention? So, on April 4, Common Cause of Pennsylvania placed the sign - a 2 1/2-by-3 1/2-foot toteboard - on an easel near the entrance to the Senate wing of the Capitol.
NEWS
April 5, 2014
In continuing its disassembly of national campaign-finance restrictions, the U.S. Supreme Court is relying partly on the naive notion that the tendency of money to influence and corrupt politics has yet to be demonstrated. Striking down limits on how much a single donor may contribute to federal campaigns per election cycle, the court this week compounded its earlier unfettering of corporate and union spending. Asserting a First Amendment right to spend unlimited sums on political expression, the court's majority is undoing a long-standing precedent under which the threat of corruption was deemed sufficient to justify moderate political spending restraints.
NEWS
September 13, 1987 | By Larry J. Sabato
Senators Robert C. Byrd (D., W.Va.) and David L. Boren (D., Okla.), the new champions of reform in campaign financing, are absolutely right to be concerned about rising campaign costs, about a system that is weighted heavily against challengers and about the appearance of corruption in the political system. But they are absolutely wrong about the causes of these problems and the best solutions for them. The senators' opposition to political action committees is unjustified and futile; their obsession with PACs draws attention away from some deeply troubling aspects of political money, and far more valuable remedies than theirs are available.
NEWS
May 7, 2007
If elected, what steps will you take to ensure that your administration does not betray and embarrass this city and its citizens through corruption? Bob Brady As the first candidate for mayor to sign the Committee of Seventy ethics policy, I know that addressing this important issue is key to the success of our city. To eliminate the root causes of corruption in Philadelphia, we must eliminate inefficiencies and make city services customer-oriented and transparent in their operation while remaining ever-vigilant in our city's fight against corruption.
NEWS
May 26, 2010
Heather Lynne Zeo, the North Penn High School teacher charged in 2009 with having sex with a student, pleaded guilty Monday to two counts of corruption of minors for her conduct with two 17-year-old boys, according to court records. Zeo, 37, of Warrington, had sex with one of the boys and "sexual communications" with the other, Montgomery County Assistant District Attorney Kate McGill said. The open plea did not come with a sentencing agreement, and McGill said she planned to ask for jail time for Zeo, who is free on bail.
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NEWS
August 30, 2016 | By Charles Krauthammer
Bernie Sanders never understood the epic quality of the Clinton scandals. In his first debate, he famously dismissed the email issue, it being beneath the dignity of a great revolutionary to deal in things so tawdry and straightforward. Sanders failed to understand that Clinton scandals are sprawling, multilayered, complex things. They defy time and space. They grow and burrow. The central problem with Hillary Clinton's emails was not the classified material. It wasn't the headline-making charge by the FBI director of her extreme carelessness in handling it. That's a serious offense, to be sure, and could very well have been grounds for indictment.
NEWS
August 25, 2016 | By Jeff Gammage, Staff Writer
A federal courtroom packed with supporters of political consultant Gregory Naylor erupted in cheers Tuesday as he was sentenced to probation for his role in the corruption case of former U.S. Rep. Chaka Fattah. Naylor could have been sent to prison for more than three years after pleading guilty in August 2014 to concealing the misuse of $622,000 in campaign contributions and federal grant funds, and lying about it to the FBI. Prosecutors, while saying his cooperation with them and testimony against Fattah was pivotal, still wanted him to serve some prison time.
NEWS
August 3, 2016 | By Mark Fazlollah, STAFF WRITER
HARRISBURG - Former state Treasurer Barbara Hafer and Chester County businessman Richard W. Ireland told a federal judge Monday that they were innocent of corruption charges. Magistrate Judge Susan Schwab, who presided over the arraignments here, set a preliminary trial date for both defendants of Oct. 4 and released them on recognizance. Hafer is charged with lying to federal agents who were questioning her in a wide-ranging investigation to determine if government contracts were traded for contributions or bribes to politicians, commonly known as pay-to-play schemes.
NEWS
July 31, 2016 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Staff Writer
A federal appeals court on Friday refused to throw out the bribery and fraud charges filed against U.S. Sen. Robert Menendez, clearing a hurdle standing between the New Jersey Democrat and a possible corruption trial. Menendez had sought to have his case dismissed, citing constitutional protections that shield the work of legislators from Justice Department interference. He is accused of accepting nearly $1 million in campaign donations and bribes from a South Florida eye doctor seeking help in disputes with the Obama administration.
NEWS
July 27, 2016
By David Gans Our campaign-finance system is badly broken and is deforming our democracy. The problem is the Supreme Court, not the Constitution. In a series of 5-4 rulings, Chief Justice John Roberts and his conservative colleagues have rewritten the constitutional guarantee of freedom of speech, insisting that money is speech, that corporations are an essential part of "We the People," and that the government's only legitimate interest in limiting election spending and giving is to prevent bribery.
NEWS
July 6, 2016
The progressive drive to broadly define and thoroughly eradicate political "corruption" has corrupted politics. But discord is not altogether pandemic in Washington, and last week, a unanimous Supreme Court, in this term's most important decision, limited the discretion prosecutors have to criminalize politics. Former Virginia Gov. Bob McDonnell was sentenced to prison for unseemly behavior. He accepted from a Virginia businessman gifts and loans valued at more than $170,000. The businessman wanted McDonnell to help promote his dietary-supplement business, including by helping him persuade state universities to study its products.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 29, 2016 | By Hugh Hunter, For The Inquirer
In a brilliant and riveting Julius Caesar , the Pennsylvania Shakespeare Festival presents Shakespeare's depiction of the fear of impending political chaos. In this play - written in 1599, when Queen Elizabeth was nearing her end - we meet Caesar, as well as his rivals, conspirators, and common citizens, a virtual tableau of everyone touched by the struggle for power. Actually, Caesar appears in only three scenes (though he hangs on as a ghost). Keith Hamilton Cobb captures his imperious hauteur.
NEWS
June 24, 2016 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Jonathan Tamari, and Chris Brennan, STAFF WRITERS
Update: U.S. Rep. Chaka Fattah on Thursday sent a letter to House Speaker Paul Ryan announcing he is resigning immediately. Earlier story: U.S. Rep. Chaka Fattah told congressional leaders Wednesday that he intends to resign in three months, following his conviction this week on federal corruption charges. But whether he stays that long may not be up to him. House Speaker Paul Ryan (R., Wis.) called on the Philadelphia Democrat to step down "immediately. " Republicans were mounting a vote to expel Fattah even before he submitted his resignation letter, and they could still push to kick him out. "Mr. Fattah has betrayed the trust of this institution and the people of Pennsylvania, and for that he should resign immediately from the House of Representatives," Ryan said in a statement late Wednesday.
NEWS
June 23, 2016 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Staff Writer
U.S. Rep. Chaka Fattah (D., Pa.) was convicted Tuesday on federal racketeering and bribery charges, putting an ignominious stamp on the career of one of the region's longest-serving members of Congress and all but ensuring that his public life will be capped with a prison sentence. Yet Fattah, 59, offered no indication of whether he intended to resign. "This is an extraordinarily difficult day for me and my family," he said in a statement. "While today's outcome isn't what we had hoped, I respect our nation's judicial system.
NEWS
June 17, 2016 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Staff Writer
The jury that will decide U.S. Rep. Chaka Fattah's fate began its deliberations Wednesday after a monthlong trial in which prosecutors accused him and four others of stealing taxpayer and charitable funds to cover his personal and political debts. U.S. District Judge Harvey Bartle III released the panel of four men and eight women to begin discussions just before 3:30, after instructing the group for nearly four hours on the legal principles that should guide its decision. Jurors deliberated for about an hour and a half before breaking for the day. They are expected to return Thursday.
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