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Corruption

NEWS
January 17, 2011
YESTERDAY, the same Tumi luggage that Carl Greene bought for 19 of his PHA managers was going for an opening bid of $605 on Ebay. You could buy it outright for $710. PHA interim chief Michael Kelly did the right thing when he demanded PHA staffers who had received the swag from Greene to return the bags; so far, of the 15 still employed at PHA, all but two have opted to return them instead of reimbursing the agency. It's unclear whether Nordstrom's, where Greene bought them, will accept them in return.
NEWS
October 1, 2004
Philadelphia City Hall is a swamp. Inside the swamp lurk thieves, schemers, racketeers and extortionists who work the levers of power right up to the mayor's office to bilk the public and enrich themselves. Even the staunchest defender of Mayor Street would be hard-pressed to avoid that conclusion after reading the seven indictments handed down Wednesday by U.S. Attorney Patrick L. Meehan. In June, Street ally Ronald A. White and former city treasurer Corey Kemp, a Street appointee, were indicted along with 10 others in a broad federal corruption investigation.
NEWS
August 14, 1995 | by Jack McGuire, Daily News Staff Writer
James Ryan was the key, investigators say. It was Ryan who carried the virus of corruption from the Police Department's now notorious 39th District into the Highway Patrol. It was Ryan who told members of the department's most prestigious outfit, with its jodhpurs and boots and strutting pride, about the easy money the boys in the 39th were making. Or so goes the story that reliable sources in the department are now revealing. The pattern of stealing drugs and money from dealers, rigging cases by illegal searches and seizures, planting drugs on suspects, and racking up overtime pay by showing up in court to testify against the fall guys was already well-established in the 39th when Ryan arrived there, sources say. Ryan, the 17-year veteran cop who has admitted his role in the corruption, fell into the pattern himself, and then took it back to the Highway Patrol when he was reassigned there about four years ago, sources said.
NEWS
April 9, 1991 | By Patrick Scott and Reid Kanaley, Special to The Inquirer
Six current or former Chester City officials and a Chester contractor were charged yesterday with offenses ranging from racketeering to theft as the result of a Delaware County grand jury's investigation into city corruption. In separate investigations, the grand jury recommended that charges be brought against former and current officials of the Chester Redevelopment Authority and the city's Resource Recovery Authority, which the panel described as "a study in administrative bumbling and corruption.
NEWS
May 5, 2005 | By Emilie Lounsberry and John Shiffman INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The jury in the City Hall corruption case spent another day deliberating the charges against former Philadelphia Treasurer Corey Kemp and four others yesterday and recessed again without reaching a verdict. Jurors were not believed to have sent any new notes to the judge yesterday. The jury is due back at the U.S. Courthouse in Philadelphia this morning for a 17th day of deliberations. The jury began weighing the charges on April 13. But after 11 days of discussions, U.S. District Judge Michael M. Baylson removed a juror last week and replaced her with an alternate.
NEWS
April 15, 1990 | By Emilie Lounsberry, Inquirer Staff Writer
Charlie Hund was 21 and "all spitshined up and ready to save the world" on his first night as a Philadelphia police officer when he and his partner were dispatched to a Kensington junkyard. But Hund wasn't going to save the world that night in 1971. There at the junkyard, amid rusty hunks of metal and scrap iron, were other cops and their sergeant - playing poker and guzzling beer and whiskey - while still other officers were taking turns with a woman in the back of a police wagon.
NEWS
January 16, 2005 | By John Young
Something is sickeningly familiar about the Armstrong Williams story. But what sickens isn't what Americans seem to be talking about. They don't seem to be talking about their part in the story. Somehow the fact that the White House paid a conservative black syndicated columnist and talk-show host $240,000 to shill on the air for the No Child Left Behind act quickly became a "media story. " It didn't become a story about corruption within a manipulative government. It didn't become a story about bribery and propaganda.
NEWS
August 12, 1990 | By Louis R. Carlozo, Special to The Inquirer
The Monroe Township Council emerged from a 90-minute closed-door session at 11:50 p.m. Monday and voted to form a committee to investigate allegations of official corruption that were raised during the June primary. The council will decide which of its members will serve on the committee at a special public meeting at 7 p.m. tomorrow. Campaign fliers charged that several township officials had "misused funds for the benefit of a private entity. " Council President Dan Marchisello and Councilwoman Kathleen Simon, two of the officials named, were defeated in their Democratic primary elections.
NEWS
December 8, 2005
To some, the deals at issue in the widening Philadelphia City Hall corruption scandal have seemed a bit penny-ante: a printing contract here, an airport concession there, some bond work. The sleazy greed displayed on FBI wiretaps was distressing, to be sure. But, to some, the wheeling and dealing didn't seem to touch on the big-picture duties of a city government. Well, is Penn's Landing a big enough deal for you? Leonard N. Ross, former law partner of Mayor Street and head of his first transition team, has agreed to plead guilty to corruption and bribery charges.
NEWS
May 11, 2005 | By R. William Potter
Thanks to a once-obscure "renaming" law from 1992 and a year-old court ruling, every municipal government in New Jersey is empowered to declare virtually every business, home and acre a "redevelopment area" - the new 1992 term for "blighted area. " Then the government can take the property after a minimum of "due process," hand it over to a "redeveloper" chosen without competitive bidding, grant the redeveloper a tax abatement, and then top everything off by issuing bonds so that local taxpayers pick up the tab. The intent of the 1948 Blighted Area Law and constitutional amendment was to combat the "scourge of urban blight," a term descriptive of a "cancer on the public," of slums radiating outward to digest once-healthy areas, transforming them into centers of crime and rampant pollution.
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