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Cory Booker

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NEWS
July 29, 2013 | By Jonathan Tamari, Inquirer Washington Bureau
NEWARK, N.J. - In seven years as mayor, Cory Booker has added touches of luster here in the Brick City. Amid still-gritty streets, he has brought name-brand businesses and restaurants, loft apartments, and a glass office tower. His wealthy admirers are writing checks to city causes, and last year British Prime Minister David Cameron visited to glean ideas for reviving rusted industrial cities. But in any close analysis of Newark's famous mayor, a fundamental question looms: Behind the undeniable flash, is there deep-rooted substance to match?
NEWS
August 8, 2013 | By Jonathan Tamari, Inquirer Washington Bureau
Last in a series of profiles of New Jersey's U.S. Senate candidates. Cory Booker, seeking his first political office, was not quite 29 when he told his hometown newspaper, "I'm the most ambitious person you'd ever meet. " He has lived up to those words, spoken to the Newark Star-Ledger in early 1998. Booker, a former Stanford University football player who then studied at Oxford and got a law degree from Yale, won a Newark City Council seat that year, knocking out an old-guard incumbent in a race that then-Mayor Sharpe James described as the Rhodes scholar vs. "the road scholar.
NEWS
December 12, 2014
CORY BOOKER is known for blazing his own trail, jumping into the national spotlight as mayor of Newark, then winning a 2013 special election to become the first black U.S. senator from New Jersey. Booker won a full term last month and, since that day, the vegetarian since 1992 has been conducting an "experiment" to eat strictly vegan for the rest of 2014. After that, who knows? He could become the first vegan U.S. senator. The day he tweeted his intentions was the same day that Center City vegan restaurant Vedge was named "Top Food" in Zagat's new Philadelphia Restaurant Survey.
NEWS
June 9, 2013 | By Jonathan Tamari, Inquirer Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - Cory Booker is in. The Newark mayor with a national profile will run for New Jersey's open U.S. Senate seat. Booker announced his candidacy Saturday in Newark. His plan to run was confirmed by a campaign aide Friday. His announcement follows a long-expected bid to formally enter national politics. Booker, a Democrat, planned two Saturday events to make an official announcement, one in Newark and the other Saturday afternoon in Willingboro. To most political observers, the well-known mayor has been seen for months as the favorite to replace Sen. Frank R. Lautenberg, who had announced he would not seek a new term and who died Monday.
NEWS
May 25, 2012 | Inquirer Editorial
Cory Booker must feel like the halfback who finally gets to play in the big game — and fumbles the football. But he will get other chances. The Newark mayor's inarticulate handling of a Meet the Press question Sunday about Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney's prior career with the Bain Capital private equity firm was painful to watch, but not fatal. Since he was President Obama's surrogate, it was surprising that Booker seemed to defend Romney, saying he disagreed with Obama ads that appear to equate private equity firms with evil incarnate.
NEWS
July 6, 2013 | By Jonathan Tamari, Inquirer Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - For months, political operatives whispered that Cory Booker had an Achilles' heel. The Newark mayor has a national name, they said, but his headline-making exploits have come at the expense of building ties to New Jersey's Democratic elite. But when the state's Senate race began, and party leaders had to pick between Booker and three faithful lawmakers with more than 60 years of service among them, the biggest Democratic names piled onto Booker's bandwagon, including many who once stood in his way. Booker's star power, according to Democrats speaking on and off the record, has trumped more traditional dues-paying politics, allowing him to hurtle past his rivals.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 2, 2016 | By Dawn Fallik, For The Inquirer
Sen. Cory A. Booker (D., N.J.) was spending a busy but fairly routine (politically speaking) Valentine's Day weekend in Las Vegas and Reno, campaigning for Hillary Clinton. Then, on the Saturday, all hell broke loose. U.S. Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia died, and the New York Times almost instantly put out a short list for potential nominations for his replacement. Booker - Yale Law grad, Rhodes scholar, former Newark mayor - was on it. The junior senator's schedule was already filled with press interviews promoting his new book, United . (He appears at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday at the Free Library.)
NEWS
April 2, 2014 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
Even as the national GOP works to take control of the Senate in November's midterm elections - and high-profile challengers crop up in states that had seemed out of play - New Jersey's top Republican political talent is passing on a chance to try to take out U.S. Sen. Cory A. Booker. In last fall's special Senate election, Booker won a closer-than-expected race against Republican Steve Lonegan, whose campaign attracted support from conservative heros such as former Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin, Texas Gov. Rick Perry, and U.S. Sen. Rand Paul of Kentucky.
NEWS
June 27, 2016 | By Jonathan Tamari, Washington Bureau
CLEVELAND - Expectations are soaring. Cory Booker arrives here a day after helping lead a 15-hour Senate filibuster demanding votes on gun laws, and amid chatter about his chances to become Hillary Clinton's running mate. The lunch crowd of roughly 300 Democrats sipping iced tea in a Westin ballroom buzz about the Senate blockade and one of their party's rising stars. Far from New Jersey, many here are already familiar with Booker, a testament to his political celebrity, talent for grabbing attention and broad personal appeal.
NEWS
January 13, 2013 | By Jonathan Tamari, Inquirer Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - The shadow campaign between Newark, N.J., Mayor Cory Booker and U.S. Sen. Frank Lautenberg just went into full swing, even if the real matchup may never happen. Neither Democrat has officially said whether he will run in 2014, when Lautenberg's Senate term ends, but reports and rumors flew Friday after Booker filed papers moving him closer to an expected campaign. A report from WNBC-TV in New York City said Lautenberg, who turns 89 this month, had decided not to seek another term, but a spokesman for the senator quickly denied that.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 24, 2016 | By Jonathan Tamari, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - It looked like a Democratic dream. On a stage early this year sat Cory Booker, a young black senator, with Julian Castro, a young Latino cabinet secretary, bouncing lines off each other as they spoke to a diverse, hip crowd in a downtown Washington synagogue. The February event, part of Booker's book tour, was filled with standing ovations for two charismatic Democrats at ease in front of crowds. For their increasingly cosmopolitan party, the event seemed like a hopeful glimpse of the future - though it stood in sharp contrast with the presidential primary then in full swing that was largely devoid of fresh, diverse voices.
NEWS
June 27, 2016 | By Jonathan Tamari, Washington Bureau
CLEVELAND - Expectations are soaring. Cory Booker arrives here a day after helping lead a 15-hour Senate filibuster demanding votes on gun laws, and amid chatter about his chances to become Hillary Clinton's running mate. The lunch crowd of roughly 300 Democrats sipping iced tea in a Westin ballroom buzz about the Senate blockade and one of their party's rising stars. Far from New Jersey, many here are already familiar with Booker, a testament to his political celebrity, talent for grabbing attention and broad personal appeal.
NEWS
April 2, 2016 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, POLITICS WRITER
WAUKESHA, Wis. - Sen. Cory Booker (D., N.J.) took out his iPhone and turned two dozen Hillary Clinton field volunteers, cheering and arguing about how to pronounce the name of their county, into a "snap," a slice of life on Snapchat. They would be famous for 10 seconds, the lifetime of a post on the social-media platform. But in a real way, Booker told the workers Thursday, they were part of something much more enduring. They were not merely mobilizing to make phone calls and knock on doors for Clinton in one of Wisconsin's most Republican counties.
NEWS
March 4, 2016
Our third annual Best Vegan Cheesesteak in Philly contes t launched Tuesday, the same day Sen. Cory Booker (D., N.J.), a vegan, came to town to promote his new book, United. Coincidence? Probably. But if you've read the book (and if not, do!), you get his point that everything, and everyone, is connected; the subtitle is Thoughts on Finding Common Ground and Advancing the Common Good . So during my chat with Booker just before he stepped onstage at the Free Library Tuesday night, you bet the subject of vegan cheesesteaks came up. The contest, after all, provides common ground for all kinds of venues to share plant-based offerings.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 2, 2016 | By Dawn Fallik, For The Inquirer
Sen. Cory A. Booker (D., N.J.) was spending a busy but fairly routine (politically speaking) Valentine's Day weekend in Las Vegas and Reno, campaigning for Hillary Clinton. Then, on the Saturday, all hell broke loose. U.S. Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia died, and the New York Times almost instantly put out a short list for potential nominations for his replacement. Booker - Yale Law grad, Rhodes scholar, former Newark mayor - was on it. The junior senator's schedule was already filled with press interviews promoting his new book, United . (He appears at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday at the Free Library.)
NEWS
January 25, 2016 | VOTERAMA IN CONGRESS
WASHINGTON - Here is how Philadelphia-area members of Congress voted on major issues last week. (The House was in recess.): Senate Screening refugees. Voting 55-43 against, the Senate on Wednesday failed to reach 60 votes for advancing a bill (HR 4038) to impose additional security screening on refugee applicants from Iraq and Syria. The bill would require the homeland security secretary, FBI director, and director of national intelligence to clear each applicant from the two countries before they entry to the U.S. could be permitted.
NEWS
January 21, 2016 | Inquirer Editorial Board
It took some nerve for Michael Nutter to ask his successor as mayor, Jim Kenney, to let a political appointee linger into the new administration - and not just because the aide in question once compared Kenney to Archie Bunker. In the waning weeks of his mayoralty, as The Inquirer's Julia Terruso reported last week, Nutter asked Kenney to allow Desiree Peterkin-Bell to soak up the additional month of her $150,000 annual salary needed to reach five years of city employment and thereby qualify for a pension.
NEWS
January 17, 2016 | BY JULIA TERRUSO, Staff Writer
IN THE WEEKS before Mayor Michael Nutter left office, he asked his successor, Jim Kenney, for a favor: Keep Nutter's director of communications on the payroll so she could collect her pension. It was a conversation between two men who have not gotten along in recent years, and a relatively big ask, since the person in question - Desiree Peterkin-Bell - had publicly feuded with Kenney on Twitter. "We talked in my office after the general election," Nutter said Thursday. "We came to an agreement.
NEWS
November 17, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
In apparent desperation after winding up at the kids' table in the last Republican presidential debate, Gov. Christie doubled down on his campaign to shamelessly pander to the radical right by adding to New Jersey voters' frustration. In a rare visit to Trenton, Christie vetoed a bill that would expand early voting and allow online and automatic registration, saying it would upend the current early-voting system and cost the state $25 million. Maybe his presidential campaign's troubles inspired Christie to kick up his misleading rhetoric.
NEWS
August 20, 2015 | By Jonathan Tamari, Inquirer Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - As New Jersey Sen. Robert Menendez announced his firm (but unsurprising) opposition Tuesday to President Obama's nuclear deal with Iran, the votes of three other local Democrats hung in the balance, and with them critical tallies that could help determine whether the accord survives congressional objections. Sens. Robert P. Casey of Pennsylvania, Cory Booker of New Jersey, and Chris Coons of Delaware all remain undecided on the pact as Obama, Secretary of State John Kerry, and other top officials try to persuade Democrats to stand with the president, and opponents, including Israeli leaders and some influential Jewish American groups, urge them to oppose what they describe as a dangerous agreement.
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