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Cosmetic Surgery

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BUSINESS
April 15, 1990 | By Anthony Gnoffo Jr., Inquirer Staff Writer
Dr. Harry Fallick, cosmetic surgeon, says he doesn't really need to advertise. But he does so aggressively. His ads feature attractive models and beckon readers to "Join the Firm" by undergoing cosmetic surgery. As a result, Fallick's name has become familiar to many local magazine readers. Advertising "has merely allowed me to focus my practice and make my name familiar," Fallick says. "I love cosmetic surgery; it's what I believe I should do. " In other cities, particularly New York and Los Angeles, advertising by cosmetic surgeons is far more provocative and prolific, with pictures that could make a pin-up calendar seem tame by comparison.
NEWS
September 30, 2011 | By Wayne Parry, Associated Press
ATLANTIC CITY - The latest casino promotion in Atlantic City gives new meaning to "going bust. " The Trump Taj Mahal Casino Resort plans to give $25,000 worth of plastic surgery to the winner of a player's card contest. The lucky one can mix and match surgeries including breast enhancements, tummy tucks, liposuction and face-lifts, until the total hits $25,000. "We wanted to change the face of a typical casino promotion," said Kathleen McSweeney, senior vice president of marketing for Trump Entertainment Resorts.
LIVING
August 7, 2000 | By Loretta Tofani, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
People thinking about cosmetic surgery face a daunting array of questions: Is this right for me? Can I afford it? How do I find a doctor qualified in the procedure I want - and how do I even decide what I want? Experts recommend thinking carefully and researching thoroughly before moving ahead. When selecting a surgeon, it can be helpful to seek out others who had the same procedure. Great-looking friends who had face-lifts may be able to recommend good surgeons. Make sure that you are comfortable with the doctor and his or her staff, and that all your questions are being answered.
LIVING
October 6, 1999 | By Robert Strauss, FOR THE INQUIRER
Christopher Reitano was 44 and quite chipper most of the time, but he was always getting sympathy from people he met. "Do you have a cold? How are your allergies?" they would ask. Reitano was getting awfully self-conscious. "Basically, my eyes were baggy, especially on the upper eyelids. It was starting to get aggravating," said Reitano, who lives in Voorhees and is an international service manager for Siemens, the global electronics firm. "I decided to do something about it. " What Reitano did nearly four years ago is what a lot of baby-boom men are doing these days - heading for the plastic surgeon.
NEWS
May 18, 2004 | By Kathy Boccella INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For a long time, Doris Newton thought about getting a face-lift. But she didn't have the nerve until she watched the television show Extreme Makeover. "It's amazing what they can do. You see a person looking one way, and after they do their magic they're transformed," said the Upper Pottsgrove grandmother, whose own transformation, her husband swears, took 10 years off her face. Other than in Beverly Hills, there are few places where the wonders of plastic surgery are more evident than on TV shows like ABC's Extreme Makeover, Fox's The Swan, and MTV's I Want a Famous Face.
NEWS
October 4, 2005 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Julius Newman, 76, of Gladwyne, a cosmetic surgeon who sculpted more than 20,000 noses in his 37-year career, died Sunday at home of complications from primary progressive aphasia, a neurological disorder. In 1965, Dr. Newman presented a paper to the College of Physicians in Philadelphia titled "Rhinoplastic Surgery for the Twisted Nose," in which he outlined a new technique for nose surgery. Several years later, he established his cosmetic-surgery practice on City Avenue in Wynnewood.
NEWS
March 16, 2010 | By DANA DiFILIPPO, difilid@phillynews.com 215-854-5934
USED TO BE, a woman who wanted to spice up her love life would buy a sex toy, learn a new lovemaking technique or invite more than one partner into her bed. But in this age of extremes, some women are taking a more radical route to please their paramour: They're having their vaginas sliced and diced. "Vaginal rejuvenation" surgeries give women a chance to tighten private parts pulverized by childbirth, or to just correct those that Mother Nature made assymetrical or imperfect, supporters of the surgeries say. "Because of the recession, most cosmetic surgeons are doing far less [business]
NEWS
September 30, 1987 | By ANN GERHART, Daily News Staff Writer (The Associated Press contributed to this report.)
Fat suctioning, America's favorite form of cosmetic surgery, is so safe and effective that the fight against flabby bodies has reached a level "unheard of in medicine," a leading Philadelphia cosmetic surgeon said today. The American Society of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgeons said in a report released today that it had documented 11 deaths and nine non-fatal cases of serious complications in an analysis of 100,000 U.S. liposuction procedures over five years. The procedure involves inserting a tubular instrument under the skin and suctioning off fat tissue.
NEWS
July 15, 2012
A caption with the photo of Abby Simmons on Saturday incorrectly characterized cosmetic surgery as a treatment for Moebius syndrome, a rare genetic disease. The surgery is to partially correct cosmetic manifestations of Moebius. No medical treatment exists for the condition. If you have a question or comment about news coverage, contact assistant managing editor David Sullivan (215-854-2357) at The Inquirer, Box 8263, Philadelphia 19101, or e-mail dsullivan@phillynews.com .
NEWS
January 16, 2012 | By Paul Jablow, For The Inquirer
'A psychiatrist with a scalpel" is the way Mark Solomon describes himself. Solomon, who has been performing cosmetic and other plastic surgery for 26 years, said judging patients' expectations is just as important as operating skill. "If I can't deliver, my answer is, 'I'm not doing it,' " said Solomon, whose practice is based in Bala Cynwyd. He estimated that he rejects up to 30 percent of prospective patients, most because their expectations are unrealistic. Jesse A. Taylor, a plastic surgeon with Penn Medicine, said he turns down an even higher estimated number, up to 40 percent.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 20, 2014 | By Barbara Boyer, Inquirer Staff Writer
MOUNT HOLLY Temeshia McDonald of Mount Holly lived well, with a high-end wardrobe, a 2012 Cadillac, and cosmetic surgery, according to court records. Among the 29-year-old's indulgences were sprees at Victoria's Secret, where she reportedly spent $355,545, federal authorities said, including $63,000 in merchandise and gift cards in just two months in 2012. On Tuesday, McDonald appeared in U.S. District Court in Newark, N.J., where she was sentenced to three years in prison and ordered to pay $557,690 in restitution after pleading guilty to fraud.
NEWS
November 8, 2013 | BY DAVID GAMBACORTA, Daily News Staff Writer gambacd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5994
AFTER the swelling went down and reality started to set in, Barbara Zimath knew she was going to need new teeth. Question was, how could she ever afford them? Zimath had been wracked with worry over unenviable problems like this one ever since Aug. 28, when a pair of scumbags robbed her and pummeled her face for sport while she waited in the predawn darkness for the Route 15 bus in Port Richmond. One front tooth was completely knocked out during the attack. Three others were left loosened and crooked because of a fracture in the bone behind her gumline.
NEWS
May 27, 2013 | By David Hiltbrand, INQUIRER TV CRITIC
You know HBO thinks it has something special when it preempts Game of Thrones to show it. And Behind the Candelabra is all that. With an Oscar-kissed cast (Matt Damon and Michael Douglas) taking on a discordant theme (the plundering love life of Liberace), this is one of the strangest and strongest TV movies in memory. Director Steven Soderbergh ( Contagion ) makes a decadent feast of the relationship between the gaudy pianist (Douglas) and his young hostage, um, protégé (Damon)
NEWS
May 9, 2013 | By Lynn Elber, Associated Press
LOS ANGELES - Jeanne Cooper, 84, the enduring soap-opera star who played grande dame Katherine Chancellor for nearly four decades on The Young and the Restless , died Wednesday in her sleep, the actor Corbin Bernsen, her son, wrote on Facebook. Ms. Cooper joined the daytime serial six months after its March 1973 debut, staking claim to the title of longest-tenured cast member. The role earned her 11 Daytime Emmy nominations and a trophy for best actress in 2008. As the years passed, Ms. Cooper brushed aside thoughts of saying goodbye to the show.
NEWS
March 11, 2013
D EAR HARRY: I just finished working on our tax returns, and I found a little problem in reviewing the 1040. The return as I prepared it has $12,100 of itemized deductions, mostly charity but also taxes and medical costs. The standard deduction for us is $11,900. The difference is just about $200. If I take the standard deduction, my taxes will go up by just about $50. If I itemize, there is a greater chance that the IRS will come after me to examine some of those items than if I take the standard deduction.
NEWS
July 15, 2012
A caption with the photo of Abby Simmons on Saturday incorrectly characterized cosmetic surgery as a treatment for Moebius syndrome, a rare genetic disease. The surgery is to partially correct cosmetic manifestations of Moebius. No medical treatment exists for the condition. If you have a question or comment about news coverage, contact assistant managing editor David Sullivan (215-854-2357) at The Inquirer, Box 8263, Philadelphia 19101, or e-mail dsullivan@phillynews.com .
ENTERTAINMENT
July 10, 2012 | By Gloria Hochman and FOR THE INQUIRER
In her best-selling book I Feel Bad About My Neck, the late author Nora Ephron wrote, "I can't stand people who say that ‘it's great to be old, great to be at the point where you understand what really matters in life.' What can they be thinking? Don't they have necks?" Walter Dowgiallo, 64, has never read Ephron's book, but he became bothered with "this little thing under my chin. I didn't like it and felt I really needed to look good because of the business I'm in. " Dowgiallo, the father of four adult children, owns a company that creates the aesthetic labels and packaging for Victoria's Secret, Liz Claiborne, and Bath & Body Works products, among others.
NEWS
June 22, 2012
DEANS, FACULTY, STAFF, parents and graduates: It is my honor to address the 666th graduating class of the School of Hard Knocks.   Graduates, you have labored hard to achieve your dream. The sheepskin (kind of awful, when you think about it) proves you have survived four years of rigorous academic challenges and intense games of beer pong to earn your degree, which you have been told is the key to employment and a bright future. That's the story you have heard, and for some of you it will be true, but not for all — not as long as the Philadelphia Housing Authority is hiring.
NEWS
June 4, 2012 | By Martha Irvine, Associated Press
WINNETKA, Ill. - What if you knew, even before your child was born, that she wouldn't look like everyone else? Clara Beatty's parents knew. They were living in Belgium at the time, a decade ago. Prenatal screening was extensive, probably more than would have been done in the United States. Those tests determined that baby Clara, their third child, was likely to be a perfectly normal kid inside. But even in the womb, doctors could see severe facial deformities - droopy eyes, under-developed cheekbones, and a tiny jaw. It meant she would need a tube in her neck to help her breathe after birth.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 29, 2012
Question: Eight months ago, after a brief illness, my 57-year-old friend's husband passed away. Their marriage had always been a bit rocky, and after his death we learned that he'd been involved in some questionable activities. Needless to say, her emotions ran the gamut from disbelief to anger to grief. During this time, I was there for her to listen, care, and encourage, and supported her decision to seek professional counseling. But now I'm concerned she might be moving too quickly through this process.
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