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Cosmetic Surgery

NEWS
November 16, 2001 | By Nate House
When we were young, our minds more easily influenced by fads, the media and friends we mistakenly thought were cool, all of us made some bad and embarrassing decisions. Pet rocks, Jams, Gasoline Jeans, tails, cigarettes, Miami Vice, parachute pants, Huey Lewis, M.C. Hammer: These are just some of the things we fell for to stay in with the in crowd. But none of these miscalculations equal the embarrassment I felt for the crowd at the recent Michael Jackson 30th anniversary tribute.
NEWS
August 5, 2001 | By Susan FitzGerald and Marian Uhlman INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Colleen Fledderman was getting anxious as she sat in the doctor's waiting room. Her daughter Amy, 18, had gone in for liposuction surgery shortly after 9:30 a.m. It was past noon, and she still wasn't out. Fledderman thought back to the appointment a week earlier when her daughter signed up for the surgery that would suction fat from her chin and stomach. The plastic surgeon had been reassuring about the popular procedure, Fledderman recalled. "This is liposuction," Fledderman, of Newtown Square, Delaware County, said the doctor told her when she inquired whether anything bad could happen.
NEWS
July 15, 2001 | By Marc Schogol INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
She was the ultimate party girl back in the '70s and '80s, when Philadelphia had a jet set. But in the '90s, entering her 50s, Kiki Olson decided the party was over - and hopped a jet. To London, where South Philly-born Olson has made a new life for herself with her sixth husband - whom the cheeky Kiki readily admits she married in 1995 mainly to gain permanent British residence. When Olson - a writer here who teaches media studies over there - visits Philadelphia nowadays, it's not to make the scene.
LIVING
November 30, 2000 | By Eils Lotozo, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Juniata Park, where blocks of tiny rowhouses abut what's left of a dense factory district, might seem an unusual place to nurture the sensitive soul of an artist. Yet homegirl Lisa Yuskavage, a Girls High grad and Tyler alum, has soared to prominence in the New York art world in the last five years. And it's been a mighty controversial trip. Critics have declared her strange, vibrantly colored paintings of opulently fleshy female figures, often in stages of undress and sometimes lacking eyes, an "important development in recent art," in the words of former Village Voice critic Peter Schjeldahl.
NEWS
August 21, 2000
The voters are likely to get what they deserve The two conventions we just witnessed did not reflect well on us, the voters. The parades of old friends and family members of the presidential candidates, not to mention the pseudo-psychological analyses of the candidates' personalities by the news media, reinforced the notion that we see the electoral process as little more than a televised soap opera. Perhaps that is true. It is a sad commentary on us that a candidate with the stature of Al Gore finds it necessary to apologize for talking "too much substance and policy" and for not being "the most exciting politician.
LIVING
August 7, 2000 | By Loretta Tofani, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
People thinking about cosmetic surgery face a daunting array of questions: Is this right for me? Can I afford it? How do I find a doctor qualified in the procedure I want - and how do I even decide what I want? Experts recommend thinking carefully and researching thoroughly before moving ahead. When selecting a surgeon, it can be helpful to seek out others who had the same procedure. Great-looking friends who had face-lifts may be able to recommend good surgeons. Make sure that you are comfortable with the doctor and his or her staff, and that all your questions are being answered.
LIVING
August 7, 2000 | By Loretta Tofani, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As she lay on the operating table, Tippen Correra, 58, took some deep breaths to relax in preparation for her face-lift. She had swallowed a Valium given by the nurse earlier. Her surgeon, Zaki Ftaiha, was injecting a four-inch needle of local anesthesia along her right jaw. The five shots of lidocaine briefly smarted. "I'm going to test you now," said Ftaiha, as he lightly traced his scalpel along her neck and face in his office operating room on North Presidential Boulevard in Bala Cynwyd.
NEWS
August 6, 2000 | By Loretta Tofani, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Two words explain the current explosion in cosmetic surgery: baby boomers. Experts say a number of factors are responsible for the dramatic and continuing rise in a range of pricey procedures. All the major reasons are somehow related to the generation born between 1946 and 1964: The economy has been healthy for an extraordinary stretch, and boomers are at the peak of their earning power. Boomers have long raised the notion of looking and feeling fit to an art form, from exercise regimens to diet pills.
NEWS
August 6, 2000 | By Loretta Tofani, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Tippen Correra looked in the mirror in the cosmetic surgeon's waiting room in Bala Cynwyd. She gazed at the heaviness under her chin, the detested jowls that had been forming since her 50th birthday. She examined the wrinkles over her lip and the recent droopiness of her upper eyelids. They made her eyes seem small. "I feel young, but my face looks really old," she said, turning away from the mirror. "I feel that I have a lot of energy, but I'm really starting to age. " It was Correra's last look at that particular face before her face-lift.
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