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Cosmetology

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NEWS
April 30, 2001 | By Leonard N. Fleming INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Phillip Wilson was deft and gentle as he rounded out the bitten-raw fingernails of his friend with a nail file. "I'm giving it a shape, smoothing it out," Wilson said as he gave a manicure to Kacy Concepcion. It was something he had learned just two days before. "Take the rough edges off . . . and make it look nice. " On this day, the two men in black smocks were taking turns giving each other manicures and facials. Nearby, another man, in a burgundy smock, was practicing giving a perm to a mannequin head.
NEWS
March 6, 1990 | By Joe Clark, Daily News Staff Writer
Kathy McKenna was born to get in people's hair. Her mentor, Sid Herman, says so: "Some people are born with the talent to be an artist. Some are born to be writers. And once in a while someone comes along that's born to do hair. " Right! Hairdos are Kathy McKenna's shtick. The pixieish McKenna does do's so well that she recently was named the city's top high school cosmetologist and is now gearing up for the state championship next month in York. McKenna, 18, a senior at Jules E. Mastbaum Area Vocational-Technical School, Frankford Avenue and Clementine Street, was crowned hair champ following a day of intensive competition - cutting, clipping, curling, coloring - at the Glemby International Salon in John Wanamaker's Center City store.
NEWS
February 9, 2016
C ARLA CLARKSON, 35, of Strawberry Mansion, who styles herself the Hair Maven, owns a salon in North Philadelphia and is opening a second in Old City in March. Clarkson counts both celebrities and professional working women among her clients. She was hired as a stylist for the movie "Creed" and was a Daily News sexy single in 2009. Q: How'd you get in the hair biz? A: My grandmother and I both attended the [former Edward W.] Bok [Technical] High School in South Philadelphia.
NEWS
May 24, 2012 | Kevin Riordan
A Garden State cosmetology and hairstyling exam offers none of the dish, disco, or "Jerseylicious" attitude of, say, a salon. Except for the snip-snip of scissors and the swoosh of sprays, silence rules as aspiring stylists labor on live models under the razor-sharp gaze of licensing examiners. "We take it seriously," says Barbara A. Ambroise, a program development assistant with the New Jersey Board of Cosmetology and Hairstyling. "It is serious. " During a 2½-hour mass exam Tuesday at Burlington County Institute of Technology in Westampton, the faces of about 150 young women and a dozen young men are fierce with concentration.
NEWS
February 17, 1989 | By Christopher Hand, Special to The Inquirer
Students already enrolled in cosmetology and auto-repair classes at Camden County's two public vocational high schools will not be required to change campuses to comply with a desegregation plan, the district's school board decided last night. The Camden County Vocational Technical Board of Education voted unanimously to "grandfather in" students who are already enrolled in cosmetology classes at the district's Gloucester Township campus and auto-repair classes at the Pennsauken campus.
NEWS
December 9, 2009 | By Jonathan Tamari INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
When Anthony Fiore wanted to go into the family barbering business, he had to learn not just to cut hair, but also how to perform manicures, pedicures, and other services he never planned to offer to his nearly all-male clientele. That's because New Jersey barbers have been required to get cosmetology licenses, which involve much more than learning to give a shave and a haircut. For Fiore, a cosmetology course left less time for learning the staples of a classic candy-stripe-pole barbershop.
NEWS
March 18, 1994 | By Gloria A. Hoffner, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Delaware County Intermediate Unit officials have ordered racial sensitivity training for all staff at the Folcroft Technical School. That decision was prompted by an incident at the school in which seven students from Chester High School charged a cosmetology teacher with making racist comments. The seven students, males and females, have been transferred to another teacher's classroom, said DCIU spokeswoman Nancy Quinn. "We take very seriously the concerns raised by the students," Quinn said.
NEWS
March 13, 2000 | By Gloria A. Hoffner, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The Cardinal O'Hara High School Band Parents Association will host a spring craft fair from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday and Sunday at the school, 1701 S. Sproul Rd., Marple Township. The fair will feature a variety of handmade crafts for the home as well as baked goods and a luncheon menu. Proceeds benefit the school's marching and concert bands. The school is part of the Philadelphia Archdiocese. VICA WINNERS Delaware County Technical High School students at the Folcroft and Aston campuses competed recently with students from Montgomery and Bucks Counties in the 2000 Skills USA, District 2, Vocational-Industrial Clubs of America Contest.
NEWS
May 9, 1995 | By Monique El-Faizy, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Cast out those images of singing, smiling stylists in bubble-gum pink smocks - the beauty school scenes in the movie Grease are pure fiction. At the cosmetology department of the Eastern Montgomery County Vocational Technical School, beauty is no dancing matter. "Sometimes they surprise you, how serious and intense they become," cosmetology teacher Kathleen Jamison said of the students competing in yesterday's Hairstyling and Nail Art competition. Once they started down the road to cosmetic genius, "you could not hear a word, or a pin drop," Jamison said.
NEWS
June 1, 2000 | By S. Joseph Hagenmayer, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Mary Ann Wilson Seymore, 50, a beauty-salon owner and popular cosmetology teacher at the Therapeutic Learning Center in Willingboro, died of complications from cancer Tuesday at her Bellmawr home. She had lived in Bellmawr since 1983, and was born in Newark. Ms. Seymore helped start the cosmetology program at the Therapeutic Learning Center, a private nonprofit school for handicapped students, two years ago. She taught there until May 24. "The students loved her," said Gladys Morse, the school's director, who hired Ms. Seymore.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 1, 2016 | By Patricia Mans, For The Inquirer
Mikal has definite plans for his future. The 19-year-old has set goals for himself and is strongly motivated to work toward attaining them. He would like to obtain a college degree and then pursue a career in the arts and entertainment field. His many interests include cosmetology and fashion design. Another goal for Mikal is to be an advocate for equal treatment of LGBTQ youth. "What's important to me now is just to know before I go to bed at night is that I have reached and helped as many people that I can during the day," he says.
NEWS
February 9, 2016
C ARLA CLARKSON, 35, of Strawberry Mansion, who styles herself the Hair Maven, owns a salon in North Philadelphia and is opening a second in Old City in March. Clarkson counts both celebrities and professional working women among her clients. She was hired as a stylist for the movie "Creed" and was a Daily News sexy single in 2009. Q: How'd you get in the hair biz? A: My grandmother and I both attended the [former Edward W.] Bok [Technical] High School in South Philadelphia.
NEWS
December 18, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Staff Writer
THE PEOPLE close to Shelly Hawkins had names like "My Onliest," "Mooda Mook," "Lumpy" and "Diggity. " Shelly's sister, Sheila Linton, got her nickname for the simple reason that she was Shelly's only sister. The others, all her children - well, only she knew the origins of their names. Giving nicknames to people in her life was an expression of Sheila's quirky sense of humor and the kick she got out of living. For instance, she and sister Sheila bore a striking resemblance to each other and people often got them mixed up, to which her rote reply was: "I'm Shelly, not Sheilah.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 2014 | By Patricia Mans, For The Inquirer
Loretta considers herself a "people person. " She's energetic, humorous, and friendly when she gets to know you. At 17, she also has an ambitious plan for her future. She intends to be a cardiovascular surgeon. She decided on that career three years ago, inspired by programs she had seen on television health channels. "I heard that there are some heart diseases that do not yet have a cure," she says, "and I hope some day to help find a cure. " Until then, Loretta keeps busy with a wide array of activities.
NEWS
December 13, 2012 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
THERE WAS something about Catherine Leatherbury that drew people to her. Friends and neighbors would drop by her house in Overbrook just to be with her and soak up the warmth of her loving personality. Catherine devoted much of her life to caring for others, especially children, for whom she had a special place in her heart. Catherine LeVere-Leatherbury, a retired beautician, an active churchwoman who traveled to Europe and Africa on missionary excursions, an artist, a loving mother, grandmother and great-grandmother, died Dec. 3. She was 89 and was living in Dauphin, Pa., but had lived most of her life in Philadelphia.
NEWS
May 24, 2012 | Kevin Riordan
A Garden State cosmetology and hairstyling exam offers none of the dish, disco, or "Jerseylicious" attitude of, say, a salon. Except for the snip-snip of scissors and the swoosh of sprays, silence rules as aspiring stylists labor on live models under the razor-sharp gaze of licensing examiners. "We take it seriously," says Barbara A. Ambroise, a program development assistant with the New Jersey Board of Cosmetology and Hairstyling. "It is serious. " During a 2½-hour mass exam Tuesday at Burlington County Institute of Technology in Westampton, the faces of about 150 young women and a dozen young men are fierce with concentration.
NEWS
December 9, 2009 | By Jonathan Tamari INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
When Anthony Fiore wanted to go into the family barbering business, he had to learn not just to cut hair, but also how to perform manicures, pedicures, and other services he never planned to offer to his nearly all-male clientele. That's because New Jersey barbers have been required to get cosmetology licenses, which involve much more than learning to give a shave and a haircut. For Fiore, a cosmetology course left less time for learning the staples of a classic candy-stripe-pole barbershop.
NEWS
April 3, 2009 | CHRISTINE M. FLOWERS
IMAY BE a hair too slow on the uptake, but I didn't pay much attention at first to the brouhaha about Brazilian waxing in New Jersey. You know, the one that started a couple of weeks ago when the New Jersey Board of Cosmetology and Hairstyling drafted a proposal to ban south-of-the-border deforestation in the state's spas and salons. (And we're not talking about the Pine Barrens.) At first, I didn't see what all the fuss was about. If a woman wants to have what appears to be a painful, useless and completely narcissistic procedure, that's perfectly fine.
NEWS
March 30, 2009
In hard times such as these, government officials everywhere are at pains to appear indispensable. In other words, it's the perfect moment for a fit of flagrantly unnecessary bureaucracy. Enter the New Jersey Board of Cosmetology and Hairstyling, which inadvertently took its obscure brand international this month by considering a crackdown on a popular (if merciless) kind of hair removal. Having collected complaints from no fewer than two women claiming injuries as a result of a so-called Brazilian bikini wax, the board put some of the state's indispensable bureaucrats on the case.
NEWS
September 2, 2007 | By Teresa Anicola FOR THE INQUIRER
At beauty schools throughout the area, students are giving the royal treatment. As young men and women near the end of their cosmetology training, they take on clients - residents who enjoy a wide range of hair services, manicures, pedicures and even facials. And with haircuts starting at less than $10, the prices are a fraction of those at salons. The students have completed at least 600 hours of cosmetology study and are eligible under New Jersey law to work in school salons offering professional services under the guidance of licensed cosmetology teachers.
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