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NEWS
December 29, 2003 | By Jennifer Snead
The ancients began it, reaching up and out with the warm arms of myth, naming their stars: Aldebaran, Bellatrix, Arcturus, Rastaban, Rigel. Characters in constellations, related, familiar. On a winter night in the mountains, by a still lake, the sky vaults weightless, vast and black. A man stands on the shore, looks up, and feels himself a thing insignificant, flinging small words that absorb into the dark and vanish there. And now we have built a better telescope, lifting the cosmic veil like a curtain from a window in a strange house on a dark night.
NEWS
March 7, 2014 | By Ellen Gray
* COSMOS: A SPACETIME ODYSSEY. 9 p.m. Sunday, Fox 29, FX, NatGeo and other Fox-affiliated channels. * RESURRECTION. 9 p.m. Sunday, 6ABC. A RECENT National Science Foundation survey of 2,200 Americans found that about one in four got this question wrong: "Does the Earth go around the sun, or does the sun go around the Earth?" So if you're wondering why it was important for Fox - yes, Fox - to turn over a chunk of weekly prime time to science education in the form of "Cosmos: A Spacetime Odyssey," a better question might be: Can 13 weeks possibly be enough?
NEWS
December 22, 1996
Like any vital field of human endeavor, science can be plagued by polemics and controversy, egos, envies and ethical quandaries. How lucky we were, then, to have Carl Sagan around for 62 years to remind us that science is also rife with joy, wit, wonder and possibility. What Mr. Sagan, who died Friday in Seattle, managed to pack into his six decades was itself a marvel worthy of scientific study. Before a rare disease shut down his revving brain, he wrote more than 20 books, won the Pulitzer Prize, composed the article on "Life" in the Encyclopaedia Brittanica, designed the plaques that flew into interstellar space with the Pioneer 10 and 11 probes, worked on the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence project, did significant research in planetary astronomy, taught, married three times and fathered five children.
NEWS
March 21, 2014 | By Molly Eichel
PART of what makes "Cosmos: A Spacetime Odyssey," the Fox remake of the PBS classic, cool is the mind-blowing science. The other part? The insane visuals, which are thanks to Ambler's Kara Vallow , a Germantown Friends grad who developed and produced the animation on "Cosmos. " "I'm a very proud Philadelphian and no one understands why," Vallow said. Vallow has been the producing partner of Seth MacFarlane for more than a decade, working on "Family Guy," "American Dad!"
NEWS
January 15, 2012
"The size and age of the Cosmos are beyond ordinary human understanding. Lost somewhere between immensity and eternity is our tiny planetary home. In a cosmic perspective, most human concerns seem insignificant, even petty. And yet our species is young and curious and brave and shows much promise. I believe our future depends powerfully on how well we understand this Cosmos in which we float like a mote of dust in the morning sky. " - Carl Sagan Chris Gibbons is a Philadelphia writer The recent news of NASA's incredible discovery streamed across the Internet on Dec. 20: "The First Earth-Sized Planets Found Beyond Our Solar System.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 27, 2010
7 p.m. National Geographic If you suffer from any kind of generalized anxiety disorder, you're probably going to want to take a pass on "Cosmic Collisions," a hair-raising hour that re-creates some of the most intense known smashups in the cosmos, including those that created Earth and the moon.
NEWS
September 20, 2011 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
A garden of gold flutters on the horizon like a mirage. One wave of flowers follows another, a sporadic but exuberant parade of blossoms that readily inspires a smile. Welcome to Cherry Hill's Route 70, where eight miles of wildflowers are abloom between lanes of concrete and 60,000 daily vehicles. "Residents love it; environmentalists love it; I love it," says Mayor Bernie Platt, who championed the pilot plantings, along with State Sen. James Beach (D., Camden). The effort cost between $8,000 and $10,000, all of it from donations, including from township police officers and firefighters.
NEWS
October 11, 1988 | By Beth Onufrak, Special to the Inquirer
Fran Mallee, a sophomore at La Salle University, was the individual medalist Thursday in the East Coast Athletic Conference Southern Qualifier at the Sheraton-Lancaster golf course in Lancaster. Mallee fired a 74 on the par-72 course to lead a field of 95 players. Mallee, a junior from Holy Ghost Prep, will play in the ECAC Championship Tournament at Hershey Country Club Saturday through Monday. "Fran has worked very hard on his game at Torresdale and has responded well to the lessons of Bud Lewis, the pro at Manufacturers Country Club," said La Salle golf coach Father Robert Breen.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 2009 | By Daniel Webster FOR THE INQUIRER
The cosmos has grown slowly, and so too has Kyle Gann's musical probing of the aura of the planets. Six parts of his The Planets were played by Relache Thursday at the Franklin Institute's Fels Planetarium, a sort of satellite to the museum's current "Galileo" exhibition. Gann launched the piece in 1994, completing "Sun," Moon," and "Venus," and Relache has been performing it, planet by planet, ever since. The "Uranus," "Mercury," and "Pluto" sections were new in this concert. The complete piece will have 10 sections, and the eight members of Relache expect to record that full cosmos this summer.
NEWS
January 10, 2000
Faith has a way of resolving theological dilemmas Robert B. Mellert points out an apparent "core difficulty" with the monotheistic view. It is, namely, that one cannot hold to all three of the following: (1) God is omnipotent, (2) God loves us and (3) Evil exists (Commentary, Jan. 2). He suggests that "if such evils do exist and God is truly caring . . . He cannot control the events in the universe. " This "trilemma," as Mellert calls it, has been convincingly refuted by countless Christian theologians through the centuries.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 30, 2016
Quebe Sisters / The Hello Strangers Sisterhood will be doubly powerful Saturday in Sellersville. The headlining trio is the Quebe Sisters, the fiddling Western swing act of Burleson, Texas, siblings Hulda, Sophia and Grace, whose last name rhymes with "maybe. " Since elementary school, the sisters, now in their 20s, have been honing their skills and the harmonies heard on their 2014 album, Every Which Way . They'll be joined by openers the Hello Strangers. The team of Larissa Chace Smith and Brechlyn Chace advertise themselves as "Pennsyltucky Fried.
NEWS
November 13, 2015 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
More than 1,400 light-years away, in a constellation named for its likeness to a swan, lies a planet a lot like Earth. Called Kepler-452b, it orbits a star similar to our sun, at just the right distance so that its surface temperature would allow the presence of liquid water. We would have no idea it was out there, along with more than 1,000 other planets discovered in the last six years, but for the stubbornness of William J. Borucki. The NASA astronomer is one of eight new winners of the annual awards bestowed by the Franklin Institute being announced Thursday.
SPORTS
June 26, 2014 | BY TYLER TYNES, Daily News Staff Writer tynest@phillynews.com
FOR 114 MINUTES, the "Sons of Ben," the Union's devoted fans, never stopped chanting at the top of their lungs. Gold-and-blue-checkered flags waved from Sections 137 and 138 of PPL Park under the lights from the Commodore Barry Bridge. And after two grueling overtime periods, the fans who packed the stadium under the nighttime sky were rewarded. Jimmy Ockford, a Pennsbury alumnus, took down Maurice Edu inside the penalty box off a long throw from Amobi Okugo. Sebastien Le Toux lined up his penalty shot, hitting his mark on the bottom left of the net to win the game in the 114th minute.
SPORTS
June 26, 2014 | By Max Cohen, Inquirer Staff Writer
If the first two games are any indication, victories will not come any easier for the Union's interim manager, Jim Curtin, than they did for his predecessor, John Hackworth. For the second straight game, the Union needed overtime to stave off an opponent from a lesser league in the Lamar Hunt U.S. Open Cup. They beat the New York Cosmos of the North American Soccer League, 2-1, Tuesday night at PPL Park. "You're always going to get the best punch from the team that plays in the lower division," said Curtin, the former Union assistant coach who was promoted when Hackworth was fired on June 10. Sebastien Le Toux scored his second goal of the game on a penalty kick in the 114th minute after he was fouled in the box to give the Union their first lead of the night.
SPORTS
June 25, 2014
IN ITS LAST match before resuming MLS play, the Union plays tonight against the New York Cosmos in a fifth-round Lamar Hunt U.S. Open Cup game at PPL Park. Kickoff is set for 7 o'clock. The Cosmos, who play in the North American Soccer League, advanced to the fifth round by defeating the New York Red Bulls, 3-0, on June 14. Three days later, the Union defeated its USL PRO affiliate, the Harrisburg City Islanders, 3-1, via two overtime goals from Andrew Wenger. Tonight's winner advances to the quarterfinals, July 8 and 9, against the New England Revolution or the Rochester Rhinos, who play tomorrow at 7:30 p.m. The Rhinos are New England's USL PRO affiliate.
NEWS
March 21, 2014 | By Molly Eichel
PART of what makes "Cosmos: A Spacetime Odyssey," the Fox remake of the PBS classic, cool is the mind-blowing science. The other part? The insane visuals, which are thanks to Ambler's Kara Vallow , a Germantown Friends grad who developed and produced the animation on "Cosmos. " "I'm a very proud Philadelphian and no one understands why," Vallow said. Vallow has been the producing partner of Seth MacFarlane for more than a decade, working on "Family Guy," "American Dad!"
NEWS
March 7, 2014 | By Ellen Gray
* COSMOS: A SPACETIME ODYSSEY. 9 p.m. Sunday, Fox 29, FX, NatGeo and other Fox-affiliated channels. * RESURRECTION. 9 p.m. Sunday, 6ABC. A RECENT National Science Foundation survey of 2,200 Americans found that about one in four got this question wrong: "Does the Earth go around the sun, or does the sun go around the Earth?" So if you're wondering why it was important for Fox - yes, Fox - to turn over a chunk of weekly prime time to science education in the form of "Cosmos: A Spacetime Odyssey," a better question might be: Can 13 weeks possibly be enough?
NEWS
January 15, 2012
"The size and age of the Cosmos are beyond ordinary human understanding. Lost somewhere between immensity and eternity is our tiny planetary home. In a cosmic perspective, most human concerns seem insignificant, even petty. And yet our species is young and curious and brave and shows much promise. I believe our future depends powerfully on how well we understand this Cosmos in which we float like a mote of dust in the morning sky. " - Carl Sagan Chris Gibbons is a Philadelphia writer The recent news of NASA's incredible discovery streamed across the Internet on Dec. 20: "The First Earth-Sized Planets Found Beyond Our Solar System.
NEWS
January 9, 2012 | By Faye Flam, Inquirer Columnist
Several astute readers have e-mailed me to point out that even if scientists find an explanation for the origin of life from nonliving matter, they haven't explained where the inanimate matter came from. Our universe has a lot of it. Who created all that? "If there are 500 million Earth-like planets, where did any of them come from? Something cannot come from absolute nothing without the concept of a Divine Designer," wrote one reader. Others reminded me of the principle of conservation of energy: "What happened to the First Law of Thermodynamics?
ENTERTAINMENT
September 22, 2011 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
'It's not the Da Vinci Code ," says Stephen Greenblatt, "but it tells the same story: the thrill and astonishment when something very old, something thought to be lost, forgotten, returns to the world with the potential to change it. " Greenblatt - who reads at 7:30 p.m. Thursday at the Central Library - is speaking of his new book, The Swerve: How the World Became Modern . He's right: Swerve isn't much like Dan Brown's ...
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