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REAL_ESTATE
February 1, 2016 | By Sally Friedman, For The Inquirer
Back in August 2007, when Susan Schroeder went to look at a home in Hainesport, she got out of her car, took one look at the front porch, and told the Realtor there was no need to go inside. "That porch did it for me - it just felt like this was the place I'd been searching for," Schroeder says of that life-changing moment. She did go inside, of course, and was delighted by what she saw in the Craftsman-style cottage: It was in pristine condition, and a prior history-buff owner had painstakingly chronicled its past, right down to the colors of the rooms.
TRAVEL
August 5, 2012
We remember fondly the bygone days of traveling with backpacks and staying in crowded hostel dorms or sleeping under the stars in crude tents. But as the years passed, comfort became a little more important and money a little more plentiful. Backpacking gave way to B&Bs with in-room facilities, and camping accommodations went from tents to tent cabins to RVs. Today, a new comfort travel chapter is unfolding, aimed at travelers who like to be close to the earth and its beauty but require a modicum of comfort and convenience.
REAL_ESTATE
September 18, 2011 | By Jen A. Miller, For The Inquirer
From her second-story deck, Jean Bell used to be able to watch Ocean City's annual Night in Venice boat parade on the bay. These days, that view is blocked by the trees growing in her backyard - a backyard that is guarded by gargoyles, as is the front door of her post-World War II cottage. "It was just a summer cottage when I bought it," says Bell, 74, who moved to Ocean City from Philadelphia in 1973. The Shore was familiar territory. When Bell was growing up, her family took vacations in Atlantic City.
NEWS
September 1, 1993 | by Gar Joseph, Daily News Staff Writer
It was a simple choice. Weather a Category 3 hurricane on a narrow spit of sand five miles off the North Carolina mainland, or spend the next six hours in an impenetrable traffic jam with a pre-schooler and his 6-year-old brother, not yet off their sugar highs. I choose to stay. But the wife, who listens too much to the news media, insists we go. The Dare County Commissioners has ordered a mandatory evacuation. But our cottage in Duck is 900 feet from the beach, built on pilings 10 feet above the ground and designed to withstand hurricanes.
NEWS
July 7, 1998 | By Kristen A. Graham, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A fire destroyed a key outbuilding at the Absecon Lighthouse yesterday, sharply setting back plans by officials to begin using the beacon this summer to bring economic development to the city's depressed Inlet section. The fire began about 5 a.m. in the light-keeper's cottage, a newly rebuilt structure that was to have served as the visitor center for the tourist attraction, which was tentatively scheduled to open early next month. Steve Schluntt, Atlantic City's acting deputy fire chief, said the blaze was brought under control about 20 minutes after the first firefighting units arrived, but that the cottage, which was unoccupied, could not be saved.
REAL_ESTATE
December 7, 2014 | By Christine Bahls, For The Inquirer
After passing through the property's security gate, rolling up the long drive, finding the 65-foot-long cobblestone courtyard (with pond and waterfall), and seeing what frames that courtyard - a transformed barn with adjacent (also transformed) farmer's cottage, all stone, all picture-perfect - a visitor wonders: Is there a dress code to get in? The answer: No. Linda Thatcher Raichle greets the caller wearing denim. Husband John Duda is barefoot. In their 60s and with previous marriages behind them, the couple are, it seems, as delighted with their Media, Delaware County, home as they are with each other.
REAL_ESTATE
July 5, 2009 | By Jen A. Miller FOR THE INQUIRER
The Drosts do not run a seafood restaurant, though there's a "Lobster Lair" sign over the front door of their three-story house in North Beach Haven. The only lobsters served there are prepared by Adrienne Drost for family and friends - at no charge. "It's the name of a game we played. The good dolphins were chased by an evil lobster," Drost, 47, said. She and daughter Samantha, now 21, were the dolphins; her husband, Joe Drost, 47, pretended to be an evil lobster, keen on capturing and whisking them to his dreaded Lobster Lair.
LIVING
August 22, 1997 | By Susan Caba, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
From the porch of her mother's summer cottage, Alix Cheston Thorne enjoys a spectacular view of boats bobbing in sparkling Penobscot Bay, against a backdrop of the verdant Camden hills a few miles across the water. She watches as a young boy - he could be a nephew, or maybe a third cousin, it's hard to tell because her familial roots are an incredible tangle - scrambles into a dinghy for a quick trip across the protected cove. "It's like a rite of passage, when you first get to go back and forth across the cove by yourself," she says, eliciting nods from the others on the porch - her mother, a cousin, a great-uncle and various others.
LIVING
July 1, 2005 | By Eils Lotozo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Up there with the piping plover, one of the most endangered species at the Jersey Shore just might be the modest beach cottage. With some lots fetching million-dollar prices, small abodes built for simple family escapes have fallen victim to the teardown phenomenon - demolished to make way for bigger, flashier places built to impress or reel in rental dollars. Yet there are still those who believe a seashore retreat doesn't require multiple decks, a two-car garage, or an air-conditioning unit the size of a Volkswagen Beetle.
NEWS
December 29, 2002 | By Susan Weidener INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The Rosemont College T - short for Tea-House - evokes another era, which officially comes to an end next month when the little white cottage will be dismantled. Though the former cafe and student lounge, built in 1937, will soon be gone, memories of the T remain. The Catholic college is now trying to figure out how to commemorate the place where students in the 1940s and 1950s played cards, smoked cigarettes, and entertained visiting men from Villanova, away from the watchful eyes of the nuns.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
REAL_ESTATE
February 1, 2016 | By Sally Friedman, For The Inquirer
Back in August 2007, when Susan Schroeder went to look at a home in Hainesport, she got out of her car, took one look at the front porch, and told the Realtor there was no need to go inside. "That porch did it for me - it just felt like this was the place I'd been searching for," Schroeder says of that life-changing moment. She did go inside, of course, and was delighted by what she saw in the Craftsman-style cottage: It was in pristine condition, and a prior history-buff owner had painstakingly chronicled its past, right down to the colors of the rooms.
NEWS
December 5, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Joan Kelly Beele, 61, of Springfield, Delaware County, who fulfilled her childhood dream of becoming a nurse, died Thursday, Nov. 26, of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis at home. As a girl in West Philadelphia and then Havertown, Mrs. Beele received medical treatment at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. The experience instilled in her the desire to take up nursing. She trained at Philadelphia General Hospital School of Nursing in West Philadelphia and graduated in 1975.
REAL_ESTATE
October 26, 2015 | By Diane M. Fiske, For The Inquirer
This may be one of the few compliments Hurricane Sandy has ever received: John Schucker and Paul Gorrell can credit the disastrous storm of 2012 with the events that led to development of the beautiful, bucolic site of their wedding last year. Schucker, a symphonic pianist and music teacher, and Gorrell, a human-resources consultant, had been a couple for 20 years when they celebrated their union in front of a newly renovated, 600-square-foot cottage on their two green acres in Stockton, N.J. Originally, the celebration was organized only around the successful conclusion of the cottage renovation and the addition of more than an acre to the property.
NEWS
April 20, 2015 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Inquirer Columnist
What are you going to do with all your stuff ? Baby boomers amassed serious assets during their lifetimes. Say you want to leave your children and grandkids some personal belongings - art, furniture, books, sterling silver and collectibles. Often that's done through a will. But it's best to have "the talk" while you're alive. Perhaps more than one child wants something with memories: mom's cookie jar, dad's pipe, or grandma's overstuffed chair. Welcome to an inheritance minefield.
REAL_ESTATE
December 7, 2014 | By Christine Bahls, For The Inquirer
After passing through the property's security gate, rolling up the long drive, finding the 65-foot-long cobblestone courtyard (with pond and waterfall), and seeing what frames that courtyard - a transformed barn with adjacent (also transformed) farmer's cottage, all stone, all picture-perfect - a visitor wonders: Is there a dress code to get in? The answer: No. Linda Thatcher Raichle greets the caller wearing denim. Husband John Duda is barefoot. In their 60s and with previous marriages behind them, the couple are, it seems, as delighted with their Media, Delaware County, home as they are with each other.
REAL_ESTATE
July 14, 2014 | By Sally Friedman, For The Inquirer
There's a small sign in Vicki D. Lachman's kitchen in Avalon. It bears four words: "No hurries, no worries. " What power and meaning those words have for Lachman, newly retired from her job as a professor of professional ethics at Drexel University, but hardly idle as she makes the transition to a less active professional life. Down in Avalon, near a stretch of boardwalk and beach and close enough to hear the sound of the ocean, Lachman, 68, looks back on a fulfilling life, and forward to a new chapter she is writing as she goes.
REAL_ESTATE
June 16, 2013 | By Sally Friedman, For The Inquirer
When he was about 12 years old, Robert Segal and his uncle used to sail into a lagoon in Margate to visit his uncle's friend. Decades later, Bob, now a seasoned attorney, still can remember dreaming of someday owning a home in Margate on a lagoon - maybe that very cottage. Remarkably, the dream came to pass. And though the original house, reportedly owned by a rum runner during Prohibition, has been replaced, it's safely stored in his memory. "We've actually had three homes on this site," said Ann Segal, also an attorney.
NEWS
December 12, 2012 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
BRIGANTINE, N.J. - The small yellow cottage has always been more than a house to Bob Bratek and his family. It was their tiny slice of oceanfront heaven, a repository of family memories built in the '60s with the hands of three generations of Brateks and any materials they could find. "It was made of pieces and hearts and souls and emotions and memories," Bratek said, remembering how he would ride there as a teenager in the family station wagon, its freight of free siding and donated wood causing the back to practically scrape the highway.
TRAVEL
August 5, 2012
We remember fondly the bygone days of traveling with backpacks and staying in crowded hostel dorms or sleeping under the stars in crude tents. But as the years passed, comfort became a little more important and money a little more plentiful. Backpacking gave way to B&Bs with in-room facilities, and camping accommodations went from tents to tent cabins to RVs. Today, a new comfort travel chapter is unfolding, aimed at travelers who like to be close to the earth and its beauty but require a modicum of comfort and convenience.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 21, 2012 | By Sally Friedman and FOR THE INQUIRER
It's not as if we were going to Antarctica.   Our friends were vacating their seashore cottage in Surf City, Long Beach Island, for three days, and had invited us to occupy it in their absence. We'd be the cottage-sitters and enjoy all the perks, including that most cherished of all LBI luxuries, a two-car driveway. So there we were on a recent morning, getting ready to dash on down to the seashore, just like we used to in the early days of our marriage. Just the two of us. Except that this time, there were lists.
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