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Cotton

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NEWS
February 16, 1995 | By Douglas A. Campbell and Jane M. Reynolds, FOR THE INQUIRER Inquirer staff writers Edward Colimore and John Way Jennings and correspondents Terri Sanginiti and David Kinney contributed to this article
The 23-year-old son of a minister was charged yesterday with the murder of 7-year-old Stephanie Monn, whose body was found in October 1993 in a bag weighted with cinder blocks floating on the Big Timber Creek in Westville. Timothy Daniel MacFarland, who is married and the father of two young children, killed the girl to quiet her after he sexually assaulted her in his home, about a block from the child's own house, said Gloucester County Prosecutor Harris Y. Cotton. MacFarland, a roofer from Harrison Township, was shackled as he stood before Superior Court Judge Joseph F. Lisa in a courtroom filled with journalists and courthouse employees.
BUSINESS
February 17, 1994 | By Donna Shaw, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The federal government yesterday approved the unregulated sale of genetically engineered cotton that resists a major chemical weedkiller. The decision was the first under a year-old Agriculture Department rule that allows such genetically engineered plants to be grown and shipped without special permits. And it brought immediate protest from environmental groups, which say herbicide-tolerant plants will increase the use of harmful farm chemicals. The biotechnology industry argues the opposite, saying such plants will help revolutionize modern agriculture by encouraging more judicious use of herbicides.
NEWS
August 18, 1991 | By Linda Bennett, Special to The Inquirer
Turning up the air conditioner is not the only way to cool your home interiors during the long, hot days and nights of August. Decorating strategies can help make living spaces seem fresher and more comfortable, too, and without much expenditure of either energy or cash. Seasonal decorating was more common before the advent of central heating and air conditioning, when homeowners took advantage of every option for making their rooms as comfortable as possible. Heavy draperies, layered rugs and woolen throws helped thwart winter's drafts and chill floors, and lacy curtains, cotton slipcovers and bare floors made hot, sticky days more bearable.
NEWS
February 23, 1997 | By Louise Harbach, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
By the standards of the early 19th century, it was a thriving business. The Retreat Factory, one of the first factories of its kind in Burlington County, was the centerpiece of a once-vibrant rural industry. Here, up to 100 people in the one-industry hamlet of Retreat manufactured cotton goods along the south branch of Rancocas Creek in what is now Southampton Township. The factory that gave its name to Retreat Road, one of the longest roads in this still-rural community, is long gone.
NEWS
July 20, 2016 | By Susan Snyder, Staff Writer
The lawyer whom embattled Temple University president Neil D. Theobald has hired as he tries to stave off his ouster by the university board has a long history of representing college presidents who need to negotiate exit deals once relationships have soured. Raymond D. Cotton, a Washington lawyer who works for the Boston-based Mintz Levin firm, is a nationally known expert on college presidential compensation. "Inside the industry, Ray is the 911 call you make when you're in trouble," said Shelly Weiss Storbeck, managing partner of Storbeck/Pimentel & Associates, an executive search firm in Media.
BUSINESS
October 5, 2015 | By Erin Arvedlund, Inquirer Staff Writer
Before the advanced degrees, money, and accolades, he was just a kid growing up farming cotton with seven siblings, his mother, and his father, who was the son of an ex-slave in Mississippi. Benjamin Nero grew up just miles away in Mississippi from where teenager Emmett Till was beaten to death. Born in 1937, Nero was a high school football star who played in college and was recruited to play professionally. He remains close with childhood friend Morgan Freeman, the award-winning actor.
LIVING
January 28, 2001 | By Denise Cowie, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For the first time in nearly a decade, the Danny Noble label is on a new collection. But this time it's not on the lively, whimsical sportswear that made the Philadelphia-based designer a fashion star in the 1980s. It's on pajamas. Elegant pajamas designed to appeal to sophisticated women who might feel they have been short-changed when it comes to bedtime. There is lots of young fun stuff out there, and plenty of lace and satin. But once you get into the really expensive sleepwear category, says the man behind the label, the choice is often between "looking like a young floozy or an old frump.
NEWS
September 19, 1994 | by Dave Racher, Daily News Staff Writer
When Thomas Cotton was convicted of two counts of second-degree murder and sentenced to life in prison last year, nobody thought too much about the jury's decision to acquit him of lesser felony charges - except his lawyer. Attorney Daniel M. Preminger filed motions for a new trial, claiming that the conviction was illegal. He argued that to be convicted of second-degree murder, the killer must have committed his crime during the commission of a felony, such as robbery and burglary.
NEWS
December 12, 1995 | By Terri Sanginiti, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A 74-year-old woman was found slain late yesterday inside the small grocery store she operated near the Salem County line, authorities said. She had been beaten and stabbed. The victim, identified as Santina Leonardi, was discovered by her 15-year- old granddaughter about 6 p.m., sprawled on the floor inside the store she ran. Gloucester County Prosecutor Harris Y. Cotton said the victim had been "stabbed and beaten about the head and face. " Cotton said preliminary indications are that robbery may have been the motive.
NEWS
March 31, 1992 | By Ross Kerber and Maureen Graham, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
Gloucester County Prosecutor Harris Y. Cotton said yesterday that his office was investigating financial discrepancies involving an official of the Washington Township Municipal Utilities Authority. The official, MUA executive director Barbara Costello, had been on an unpaid leave of absence since March 23. The MUA board accepted Costello's resignation last night. Cotton said he was uncertain how much money was involved, but a source familiar with the investigation said a preliminary audit had turned up about $3,000 missing during the last two years.
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NEWS
July 20, 2016 | By Susan Snyder, Staff Writer
The lawyer whom embattled Temple University president Neil D. Theobald has hired as he tries to stave off his ouster by the university board has a long history of representing college presidents who need to negotiate exit deals once relationships have soured. Raymond D. Cotton, a Washington lawyer who works for the Boston-based Mintz Levin firm, is a nationally known expert on college presidential compensation. "Inside the industry, Ray is the 911 call you make when you're in trouble," said Shelly Weiss Storbeck, managing partner of Storbeck/Pimentel & Associates, an executive search firm in Media.
NEWS
June 30, 2016 | By Andee Hochman
THE PARENTS: Brigit Barry, 30, and Michael Cottone, 33, of Broomall THE CHILD: Vincent (Vin) Kai Barry-Cottone, adopted April 27, 2016 WHO PROPOSED TO WHOM: After three years of dating, Brigit said, "Let's go to the ring store. " The new house, the one on which they'd just closed, reeked of smoke. Water pooled in the basement. Firefighters had punched holes in the back in order to fight a smoldering blaze that began when a faulty heat lamp in the bathroom ignited fibers from stripped wallpaper.
BUSINESS
October 5, 2015 | By Erin Arvedlund, Inquirer Staff Writer
Before the advanced degrees, money, and accolades, he was just a kid growing up farming cotton with seven siblings, his mother, and his father, who was the son of an ex-slave in Mississippi. Benjamin Nero grew up just miles away in Mississippi from where teenager Emmett Till was beaten to death. Born in 1937, Nero was a high school football star who played in college and was recruited to play professionally. He remains close with childhood friend Morgan Freeman, the award-winning actor.
SPORTS
June 6, 2014 | By Tyler Tynes, Daily News Staff Writer
FORMER Providence guard Bryce Cotton will work out for the Sixers on June 13, his agent, Harold B. Woolfalk, confirmed yesterday. The Sixers have seven draft picks in this year's NBA draft, June 26 at the Barclays Center in Brooklyn: Nos. 3 and 10 in the first round and Nos. 32, 39, 47, 52 and 54 in the second round. Cotton is considered a late second-round pick or an undrafted free agent. "He has been described as having very well-developed point guard skills for someone who played the position only his last year in college," Woolfalk said.
NEWS
January 21, 2014 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Robert W. Cotton, 68, of Mantua, who retired in 1996 as a sergeant in the Gloucester County Sheriff's Department, died of lung problems Wednesday, Jan. 15, at home. Mr. Cotton grew up in Camden and graduated from what is now the Camden County Technical Schools in the mid-1960s. "He was a chef right out of high school," his wife, Betty, said. "The main job that he liked a lot was being the chef for the executives at Campbell Soup Co. " headquarters in Camden, she said.
NEWS
September 6, 2013 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Fittingly, WXPN's yearlong Mississippi Blues Project - an online interactive program with accompanying live shows - ends with a dance party Friday night at Theatre of Living Arts. In the hands of Jonny Meister, host of XPN's The Blues Show , and his longtime associate David Dye ( World Cafe creator and DJ for WXPN's "Funky Friday Dance Party"), that finale will celebrate all shades of blues. James Cotton is on board for Friday's live Funky Blues Finale and Dance Party at TLA. Throughout his career, the harmonica player, now 78, has played key roles in some of the blues' greatest recordings.
SPORTS
January 5, 2013 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Heisman Trophy winner Johnny Manziel ran for two touchdowns, threw for two more and had a Cotton Bowl-record 516 total yards as 10th-ranked Texas A&M wrapped up its first SEC season with a 41-13 win over No. 12 Oklahoma on Friday night in Arlington, Texas. The Aggies (11-2) never trailed after Manziel tiptoed the sideline for a 23-yard TD run on their opening drive of the game. Oklahoma (10-3), which like the Aggies entered the game with a five-game winning streak, went three-and-out on its first three drives after halftime.
NEWS
January 4, 2013 | By Kim Cook, Associated Press
There are stores full of exquisite bedding. But fancy sheets, duvets, and mattresses can sometimes fall short of our wish lists, in style, price, comfort, or all three. What if you could make your own? You don't need to be a professional designer, or even much of a sewer, to create one-of-a-kind bedding that looks as nice as the stuff of dreams. First, your existing bedding can be embellished with sew-on or iron-on appliqu├ęs, available in craft and stitchery supply stores. Writer and crafter Kim Ray offers suggestions on the website Doityourself.com.
NEWS
December 24, 2012 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
BILL COTTON was once a 200-pound weakling. Maybe no bully would kick sand on him at the beach, but Bill didn't feel good about himself. His blood pressure was through the roof, and he was advised to take drugs to lower it. But Bill had a better idea. No drugs for him. He would get himself in shape, lose weight and return to a healthy lifestyle. The method he chose: bicycle riding. And not just gentle rides around the neighborhood. Bill became a devotee of long bike rides - long, as in hundreds of miles.
NEWS
April 29, 2012 | Lisa Scottoline
Mother Mary and bed linens have a long and storied history. You may recall that a few years ago, she refused to use the sheets that Brother Frank bought her, because there were bats printed on the fitted sheet and a life-size Batman on the flat sheet. Mother Mary couldn't picture Batman lying on top of her. Neither can I. Visualize among yourselves. Frank had gotten the sheets because they were on sale, which gives you an idea of how the Flying Scottolines roll.
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