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Counterfeit Goods

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NEWS
August 18, 1989 | By Ray Rinaldi, Special to The Inquirer
Diamond-studded Gucci watches for only $20? Gold and silver Rolexes for just $5 dollars more? How about an Adidas or Fila warmup suit for about half those department store prices? Sound too good to be true? According to the U.S. Marshal's Office, it's impossible - and illegal. The office emphasized that fact yesterday with a visit to the Columbus Farmers Market in Burlington County, where investigators confiscated a truck full of the allegedly counterfeit designer jewelry and clothing selling for rock-bottom prices.
BUSINESS
November 28, 2012 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Staff Writer
  The websites bore names such as FlyersJerseyShop.com, TiffanyOnlineStore.com, and ErgoBabyShop.com, and pitched merchandise that looked authentic. But customers at those and dozens of similar websites shut down Monday by U.S. and European authorities bought counterfeit and typically shoddy goods, U.S. customs investigators said. For the third straight year, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents marked "Cyber Monday" with a crackdown on Internet sales of counterfeit goods.
NEWS
October 5, 2012 | By John P. Martin, Inquirer Staff Writer
For the fashion-conscious, New Discoveries seemed to be a shopper's paradise. Wedged into one of South Street's busier blocks, the Philadelphia store boasted the most stylish brands of bags and accessories: Gucci, Coach, Prada, Jimmy Choo, Fendi, Ugg, Dior, Chanel, Tiffany, Kate Spade, and so on. The only problem: Most of the goods were frauds. On Wednesday, a federal judge sentenced the shop owner, Yi Ping Zheng, to 44 months in prison for trafficking counterfeit goods. Zheng, a legal alien, also could face deportation back to China.
BUSINESS
December 2, 2012
"The traditional post-Black Friday lull, normally starting the following week, started on . . . Black Friday. " - Craig Johnson, a retail consultant and president of Customer Growth Partners, on a weaker-than-expected report on retail sales in November. "The economy certainly hasn't taken off, but it's nowhere close to a stall. The economy is still underperforming its full potential, but once we get past the fiscal cliff uncertainty, we could see stronger growth next year. " - David Kelly, chief global strategist for JPMorgan Funds, on the reported 2.7 percent third-quarter GDP. "The first thing I'd do is make sure we don't raise taxes on 98 percent of the American people.
NEWS
October 27, 1999 | by Michael Hinkelman, Daily News Staff Writer
They were outside the First Union Center last night. We're not talking about groupies hoping to catch a glimpse of Latino crooner Ricky Martin livin' la vida loca. We're talking about trademark pirates selling unauthorized Martin T-shirts. Yesterday, City Council's Committee on Licenses & Inspections heard testimony that vendors who peddle fake merchandise con consumers, rob the city of tax dollars and threaten the health and safety of decent citizens with sunglasses that shatter and T-shirts that burst into flames at the flick of a Bic. Attorney M. Kelly Tillery, a lawyer specializing in intellectual property theft and a member of the International Anti-Counterfeiting Coalition, said the problem of counterfeit goods being sold on the streets of Philadelphia was "rampant.
NEWS
December 6, 2001 | By Kevin Dale INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Police say Stephen James Roe, an alleged small-time peddler of counterfeit goods, had found the ideal market for his knockoff Prada and kate spade handbags: a preschool fund-raiser at an affluent Penn Valley synagogue. In fact, before township police arrested Roe, 45, last week, investigators say he sold a couple of thousand dollars worth of his deeply discounted high-end merchandise at the Har Zion Temple event. "It was quite a sum of money," said Stuart Drobny, president of Stumar Investigations, a private firm that had been investigating Roe. High-end companies, such as Channel and Gucci, hire Drobny's firm to track trademark counterfeiters.
NEWS
July 15, 2010 | By MICHAEL HINKELMAN, hinkelm@phillynews.com 215-854-2656
A Plainsboro, N.J., man was sentenced to a year and a day in a federal lockup yesterday for his role in a counterfeit ring that authorities said was related to a plot to funnel money and weapons to Hezbollah. Prosecutors said Michael Katz, 67, one of 10 defendants charged in the case, was unaware of the link to Hezbollah and was not charged with providing material support to a terrorist group. He pleaded guilty in March to conspiracy and trafficking in counterfeit goods. Authorities said Katz twice traveled with several codefendants to Philadelphia in July 2008 to pick up 1,572 pairs of knock-off Nike sneakers and 334 fake Mitchell & Ness Nostalgia Co. sports jerseys from a government informant and load them into vans, one of which belonged to Katz.
NEWS
June 10, 2010 | By DANA DiFILIPPO, difilid@phillynews.com 215-854-5934
Federal authorities have been cracking down on counterfeit sports merchandise since the start of the Stanley Cup playoffs and are warning vendors who sell apparel with fake trademarks that they will face criminal prosecution. The Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) agency said that after the playoffs began, agents investigated 14 vendors and seized more than 900 counterfeit hats, T-shirts and jerseys worth $58,450. Most items seized bore counterfeit NHL trademarks, although investigators also found fake items bearing logos from Major League Baseball, the NFL and NBA, the ICE said.
NEWS
September 20, 2013 | BY JASON NARK, Daily News Staff Writer narkj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5916
EVEN KEVIN DURANT, one of the NBA's best free-throw shooters, would have a hard time winning his own Oklahoma City Thunder jersey by shooting hoops on the Wildwood boardwalk. The rims aren't exactly circular, the balls are overinflated and seagulls often block your line of vision. And if that's not bad enough, federal authorities say, shooters lucky enough to sink shots at games operated by two Atlantic County brothers have been rewarded with knock-off jerseys. According to the U.S. Attorney's Office in Newark, Brett Strothers, 32, of Egg Harbor Township, and Evan Strothers, 28, of Mays Landing, are accused of buying 16,700 counterfeit NBA and NFL jerseys from two men, Joseph Cuozzo, an American living in Thailand, and Haresh Aildasani, an Indian citizen living and manufacturing the fake jerseys in China.
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NEWS
September 20, 2013 | BY JASON NARK, Daily News Staff Writer narkj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5916
EVEN KEVIN DURANT, one of the NBA's best free-throw shooters, would have a hard time winning his own Oklahoma City Thunder jersey by shooting hoops on the Wildwood boardwalk. The rims aren't exactly circular, the balls are overinflated and seagulls often block your line of vision. And if that's not bad enough, federal authorities say, shooters lucky enough to sink shots at games operated by two Atlantic County brothers have been rewarded with knock-off jerseys. According to the U.S. Attorney's Office in Newark, Brett Strothers, 32, of Egg Harbor Township, and Evan Strothers, 28, of Mays Landing, are accused of buying 16,700 counterfeit NBA and NFL jerseys from two men, Joseph Cuozzo, an American living in Thailand, and Haresh Aildasani, an Indian citizen living and manufacturing the fake jerseys in China.
BUSINESS
December 2, 2012
"The traditional post-Black Friday lull, normally starting the following week, started on . . . Black Friday. " - Craig Johnson, a retail consultant and president of Customer Growth Partners, on a weaker-than-expected report on retail sales in November. "The economy certainly hasn't taken off, but it's nowhere close to a stall. The economy is still underperforming its full potential, but once we get past the fiscal cliff uncertainty, we could see stronger growth next year. " - David Kelly, chief global strategist for JPMorgan Funds, on the reported 2.7 percent third-quarter GDP. "The first thing I'd do is make sure we don't raise taxes on 98 percent of the American people.
NEWS
November 28, 2012
A photograph accompanying a story Tuesday about a government crackdown on websites that sold counterfeit goods portrayed a seized website without identifying the domain that was seized. The seized site, bearsjerseystore.com, used the name and logo of a legitimate website, http://footballfanatics.com , that sells authentic goods. The image was provided by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement. A story Sunday about outstanding loans by the Delaware River Port Authority misstated the status of one loan.
BUSINESS
November 28, 2012 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Staff Writer
  The websites bore names such as FlyersJerseyShop.com, TiffanyOnlineStore.com, and ErgoBabyShop.com, and pitched merchandise that looked authentic. But customers at those and dozens of similar websites shut down Monday by U.S. and European authorities bought counterfeit and typically shoddy goods, U.S. customs investigators said. For the third straight year, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents marked "Cyber Monday" with a crackdown on Internet sales of counterfeit goods.
NEWS
October 5, 2012 | BY MICHAEL HINKELMAN, Daily News Staff Writer
WHEN FEDERAL AGENTS searched New Discoveries Handbags on South Street last December, they found more than 3,000 purses, handbags, apparel, wallets, jewelry and other fashion accessories. Almost all of it was fake. Most of the items had counterfeit Gucci, Versace, Prada, Armani and other high-end fashion labels, and agents found a soldering and welding device and other machines used to affix labels to the items. Yi Ping Zheng, 48, the owner of the store, was sentenced on Wednesday by U.S. District Judge Eduardo Robreno to 44 months in prison for trafficking in counterfeit goods and was fined $2,500.
NEWS
October 5, 2012 | By John P. Martin, Inquirer Staff Writer
For the fashion-conscious, New Discoveries seemed to be a shopper's paradise. Wedged into one of South Street's busier blocks, the Philadelphia store boasted the most stylish brands of bags and accessories: Gucci, Coach, Prada, Jimmy Choo, Fendi, Ugg, Dior, Chanel, Tiffany, Kate Spade, and so on. The only problem: Most of the goods were frauds. On Wednesday, a federal judge sentenced the shop owner, Yi Ping Zheng, to 44 months in prison for trafficking counterfeit goods. Zheng, a legal alien, also could face deportation back to China.
NEWS
November 29, 2011 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
Websites that present fake designer shoes as the real deal took a heavy hit Monday, as did online purveyors of bogus Louis Vuitton bags and knock-off Oakley sunglasses. But when Immigration and Customs Enforcement officials cracked down in an operation timed to the start of the holiday cyber-shopping season, they landed hardest on the companies selling bogus sports paraphernalia and replica game shirts. ICE Director John Morton said websites peddling counterfeit goods have resulted in "American jobs lost, American business profits stolen, and American consumers' receiving substandard products.
BUSINESS
October 21, 2010 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
A corporate memory lapse is costing discount retailer Burlington Coat Factory Warehouse Corp. $10 million. That's how much the Burlington County company has agreed to pay to settle a long-running legal fight with Fendi, the Italian maker of luxury goods, over the sale of counterfeit handbags, wallets, and other items, Fendi said Wednesday. Fendi handbags are priced online at Nordstrom for between $460 and $4,600. Neither Fendi nor Burlington Coat Factory, which says it has not sold Fendi products since 2006, provided examples of prices at Burlington, which claims to offer discounts up to 60 percent.
NEWS
July 15, 2010 | By MICHAEL HINKELMAN, hinkelm@phillynews.com 215-854-2656
A Plainsboro, N.J., man was sentenced to a year and a day in a federal lockup yesterday for his role in a counterfeit ring that authorities said was related to a plot to funnel money and weapons to Hezbollah. Prosecutors said Michael Katz, 67, one of 10 defendants charged in the case, was unaware of the link to Hezbollah and was not charged with providing material support to a terrorist group. He pleaded guilty in March to conspiracy and trafficking in counterfeit goods. Authorities said Katz twice traveled with several codefendants to Philadelphia in July 2008 to pick up 1,572 pairs of knock-off Nike sneakers and 334 fake Mitchell & Ness Nostalgia Co. sports jerseys from a government informant and load them into vans, one of which belonged to Katz.
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