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NEWS
May 28, 1987 | By JIM SMITH, Daily News Staff Writer
Former city Democratic Party chairman Peter J. Camiel is in jeopardy of losing "Fatland," his country home, because he put it up as collateral in 1980 for a $400,000 bank loan to several businessmen. The businessmen haven't made payments on the loan since late 1983, and the Citizens State Bank of New Jersey yesterday filed a mortgage foreclosure suit against Camiel and his wife, Nina, in U.S. District Court. Camiel, 77, a former state senator who still serves as Democratic leader of the 5th Ward in Center City and as a member of the Pennsylvania Turnpike Commission, was flabbergasted by news of the suit, but insists the matter will be resolved before Fatland is on the auction block.
NEWS
April 14, 1988 | By Scott Brodeur, Special to The Inquirer
Architect Van B. Buren Jr. unveiled plans for the new Gloucester County Office of Education at a county freeholders' work session last night in Woodbury, calling the proposed $1.3 million building a "country home. " The one-story, 18,000-square-foot building, planned for four acres at Tanyard and Salina Roads in Deptford, will house county Superintendent Peter B. Contini and his staff, along with two state education agencies. The county school office has leased space in Williamstown since a fire in February 1986 destroyed its former building, known as The Barn.
REAL_ESTATE
May 4, 2014 | By Diane M. Fiske, For The Inquirer
Lynda O'Gwynn and Tom Purdy abandoned city life in 2001 in favor of more bucolic environs. Which they found by staying within the city limits (although just barely) in Upper Roxborough. "I can't believe this is still Philadelphia," is the comment that first-time visitors to the couple's home typically make. Their cottage perches on a hill in a northwest section of the Shawmont neighborhood. "Before the leaves come out and the trees are still bare, you can see for miles," O'Gwynn says.
LIVING
July 14, 2006 | By Virginia A. Smith INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Sometimes, change happens by chance. For Brian Foster and Ernie Sesskin, it all started with a friend's impromptu conversation at a party five years ago. Long story short, they heard about a small place with some land for sale and ended up buying it to be their country house. Truth be told, this "country house" is in the upper Roxborough section of Philadelphia, and it's a humble bungalow, just 1,400 square feet, built in 1927. But the "country" part of the deal is something else: three wooded acres with million-dollar views stretching all the way to Gladwyne in summer and to the Schuylkill in winter.
LIVING
June 17, 2005 | By Eils Lotozo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A few months ago, my husband and I started looking for a house to buy. We're thinking big, old, gracious, with a garden to putter in and the kind of peaceful setting our longtime city existence has made us yearn for. This will be the place our small daughter will grow up in, and where we hope we'll grow old together. In short, we're searching for the house of our dreams. And now that I've read Dennis Wedlick's inspiring and information-packed new book, Good House Hunting: 20 Steps to Your Dream Home (Harper Design, $24.95)
NEWS
April 19, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Alice Belew Lonsdorf, 89, of Gladwyne, a former assistant dean for alumni affairs at the University of Pennsylvania Law School and a tireless civic leader, died Thursday, April 10, of pulmonary fibrosis at her home in Waverly Heights. "She was entertaining visitors and going to meetings until a week ago," said her son, George. "She was fierce about maintaining her activities until she couldn't. " A Fort Worth, Texas, native, Mrs. Lonsdorf graduated at age 19 from the University of Texas with a bachelor's degree in fine arts.
NEWS
October 5, 2012
Wendy Weil, 72, a literary agent known for her low-key but determined style and for an eclectic clientele of groundbreaking and best-selling authors, died Sept. 22 of a heart attack at her country home in Cornwall, Conn. A New York native and graduate of Wellesley College, Ms. Weil had Alice Walker, Rita Mae Brown, Fannie Flagg, and Mark Helprin among her clients. She was in publishing for 50 years. She started in the training program at Doubleday, then moved on to become an agent, eventually founding Wendy Weil Agency Inc. in 1986.
NEWS
May 13, 2001 | By Zlati Meyer INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
From a 10,000-square-foot factory on dusty Route 611 in Bedminster, GBC Millworks sells weather vanes and cupolas. Most of its customers are not in nearby rural townships, though. A significant number of the wind-loving roof-toppers even head to California. That is not surprising, considering that country-style decor is as popular in the West and urban areas as in Bucks County, a bastion of simple-style decorating. The visual joys of country decor - cupolas on roofs, rustic furniture, soft gingham and warm wood - are nothing new to this region, but it is increasingly popular elsewhere.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 1996 | By Douglas J. Keating, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
Natalia is the central character in Ivan Turgenev's A Month in the Country, and in the Simply Classic Theatre Company production the performance of the role is indicative of what is both successful and unsatisfying about the production. Jessica Hendra's intelligent portrayal shows the many sides of this bored, restless wife of a wealthy 19th-century Russian landlord. From scene to scene, the audience sees Natalia as flirt, Natalia as commanding lady of the manor, Natalia as calculating manipulator and, finally, Natalia smitten by love.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 2, 1989 | By Kay Gardella, New York Daily News
You probably remember her best as Emma Peel from TV's "The Avengers. " Diana Rigg, 20 years later, still looks like she could fit into that black leather suit that became her trademark. But now she's wondering whether she can fit into the shoes of Vincent Price as host of PBS' "Mystery" when it returns in October. There was a time when she could. It was years ago when the two played together in "Mystery of Blood. " As the elegant actress recalls: "Vincent had problems with his feet from wearing shoes that didn't fit right.
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REAL_ESTATE
May 4, 2014 | By Diane M. Fiske, For The Inquirer
Lynda O'Gwynn and Tom Purdy abandoned city life in 2001 in favor of more bucolic environs. Which they found by staying within the city limits (although just barely) in Upper Roxborough. "I can't believe this is still Philadelphia," is the comment that first-time visitors to the couple's home typically make. Their cottage perches on a hill in a northwest section of the Shawmont neighborhood. "Before the leaves come out and the trees are still bare, you can see for miles," O'Gwynn says.
NEWS
April 19, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Alice Belew Lonsdorf, 89, of Gladwyne, a former assistant dean for alumni affairs at the University of Pennsylvania Law School and a tireless civic leader, died Thursday, April 10, of pulmonary fibrosis at her home in Waverly Heights. "She was entertaining visitors and going to meetings until a week ago," said her son, George. "She was fierce about maintaining her activities until she couldn't. " A Fort Worth, Texas, native, Mrs. Lonsdorf graduated at age 19 from the University of Texas with a bachelor's degree in fine arts.
NEWS
June 2, 2013
The Burning Air By Erin Kelly Pamela Dorman Books. 321 pp. $26.95 Reviewed by Katie Haegele   The Poison Tree and The Dark Rose , Erin Kelly's first two novels, were engrossing thrillers with wonderful plot twists and loose ends that didn't get tied up until the very last page. Set partially in the '90s, both novels are romantic and gothic, with crumbling London mansions and pouty heroines who go around smoking clove cigarettes and studying medieval tapestry.
NEWS
October 5, 2012
Wendy Weil, 72, a literary agent known for her low-key but determined style and for an eclectic clientele of groundbreaking and best-selling authors, died Sept. 22 of a heart attack at her country home in Cornwall, Conn. A New York native and graduate of Wellesley College, Ms. Weil had Alice Walker, Rita Mae Brown, Fannie Flagg, and Mark Helprin among her clients. She was in publishing for 50 years. She started in the training program at Doubleday, then moved on to become an agent, eventually founding Wendy Weil Agency Inc. in 1986.
NEWS
January 20, 2012 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
Eavesdrop in a garden, and what do you hear? Not a lot of narrative. Mostly exclamations over the beauty of something and curiosity about what it is, in and around the absorbing silence. So it is that Paul W. Meyer has "written" a new book about the Morris Arboretum in Chestnut Hill with no text, just photographs, most taken over the last eight years. Its title is a straightforward Morris Arboretum of the University of Pennsylvania Through the Lens of Paul W. Meyer. "It's meant to be a walk through the garden," explains Meyer, 59, a self-taught shutterbug who has worked at Morris for almost 36 years, the last 21 as director.
NEWS
November 3, 2008 | By RITA CALDERON
AFTER WALKING through neighborhoods in Scranton, Easton and Norristown talking with many Pennsylvanians, I headed home to New York feeling convinced we're one country. I spent four weekends knocking on doors in Pennsylvania as a volunteer for the Barack Obama campaign, and here's what I found: We are more alike than different. Make no mistake, the people I talked to weren't unanimously for Obama, but they were all Americans. The needs and worries of retired steel workers and hunters, of soccer moms and executives, nurses and lawyers, retired teachers and Vietnam vets, were the same as mine.
LIVING
July 14, 2006 | By Virginia A. Smith INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Sometimes, change happens by chance. For Brian Foster and Ernie Sesskin, it all started with a friend's impromptu conversation at a party five years ago. Long story short, they heard about a small place with some land for sale and ended up buying it to be their country house. Truth be told, this "country house" is in the upper Roxborough section of Philadelphia, and it's a humble bungalow, just 1,400 square feet, built in 1927. But the "country" part of the deal is something else: three wooded acres with million-dollar views stretching all the way to Gladwyne in summer and to the Schuylkill in winter.
LIVING
June 17, 2005 | By Eils Lotozo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A few months ago, my husband and I started looking for a house to buy. We're thinking big, old, gracious, with a garden to putter in and the kind of peaceful setting our longtime city existence has made us yearn for. This will be the place our small daughter will grow up in, and where we hope we'll grow old together. In short, we're searching for the house of our dreams. And now that I've read Dennis Wedlick's inspiring and information-packed new book, Good House Hunting: 20 Steps to Your Dream Home (Harper Design, $24.95)
NEWS
September 22, 2004 | By Julie Stoiber INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
One significant barrier stood in the path of Philadelphia's westward expansion: a river with an odd name. So imagine the fanfare in January 1805, when the first permanent bridge across the Schuylkill opened to the public. Not only was the 550-foot-long covered bridge at High Street (now Market) one of the great structures of its kind in the country, but it gave Philadelphians safe, dependable passage to the lush expanse on the river's other side, where the smoke of Indian wigwams had once curled above forest trees and wealthy Philadelphians had built summer retreats accessible by ferry.
NEWS
August 23, 2004 | By Dick Cooper INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
John Sanford is quick to point out the features of his summer home: full kitchen, built-in entertainment center, large bedroom. "Built the deck myself," he said as he settled into an easy chair in the shade of an awning attached to his 38-foot camper trailer parked up a soft slope from Brandywine Creek. The call of the not-too-wild led Sanford and his wife, Bernice, to Chester County 30 years ago. Then again, they started out from the Port Richmond section of Philadelphia.
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