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NEWS
May 27, 1987 | By Joyce Gemperlein, Inquirer Staff Writer
Carol Drew and Gerald Ferguson, Stephanie Nakasian and Hodd O'Brien all lived - stressfully and expensively, they are wont to point out - in New York City, until they got an eyeful of land prices and an earful of country quiet here in Monroe County. So, it was Westward ho! about a year ago. The four now call northeastern Pennsylvania home. Nakasian and O'Brien commute from their three-bedroom home, which they purchased last year for $60,000, to their jobs as musicians in New York City and northern New Jersey.
NEWS
August 8, 1993 | By Marguerite P. Jones, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
It's just the sort of place a city kid would dream of: a 15-acre spread with rolling hills, a pond, arching willow trees, a garden, swinging ropes and a basketball hoop. For four years in a row, this is where Marquis Charles, 11, has found respite from pollution, noise and the daily hassles and fears that accompany life in his Queens, N.Y., neighborhood. This is a retreat where he can swim in a pool, take a walk through the woods, and pick corn at the neighbor's farm. "I like it here," Marquis said.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 21, 1993 | By Joe Logan, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
If you know her from the radio, from her folksy, homespun essays about life in rural Georgia, you'd swear on a bushel of garden squash that Bailey White was some feeble, 80-year-old grandma in orthopedic shoes. On National Public Radio's All Things Considered, the afternoon news program that airs her occasional three-minute commentaries, White's raspy voice creaks and cracks like the sagging floorboards of a 150-year-old farmhouse. Will she make it through this thing? Then, just when you're convinced she won't, White starts in on how Mama said this the other day, or Mama did that.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 4, 1995 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
The selfish old lecher who travels to a remote, run-down country estate wonders if the cases of wine have been damaged by the journey. Much the same query could be raised against the idea of moving Chekhov's beloved Uncle Vanya from Russia to Australia just after World War I. Country Life wastes little time in showing that old wine can do very well in a new bottle. Just as Shakespeare's plays can survive and flourish - however they are relocated and reimagined - Uncle Vanya is an equally pliant masterpiece.
LIVING
July 26, 2002 | By Eils Lotozo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It looked like the good life. The apartment in the tony San Francisco neighborhood, the well-paid jobs in advertising. But for Cathleen Miller and her husband, Kerby Macrae, it had all begun to seem hollow. She really wanted to write and to teach. He wanted to work with his hands. And that's how Miller, 46, and Macrae, 43, ended up in the tiny central Pennsylvania village of Zion, renovating a beat-up 100-year-old farmhouse while she slogged through graduate school at Pennsylvania State University and he worked in a furniture factory.
NEWS
August 30, 2011
It is a truism that the chasm between Philadelphia and rural Pennsylvania runs deep and wide. The country people don't understand us well, and face it: We don't get them either. Still, plenty about country life - or the way we imagine it, at least - appeals to the city set. The physical beauty. The tranquillity. The nice people. Its pull is particularly strong in the dog days of an urban summer spoiled by the trifecta of historically foul weather, flash mobs, and Arlene Ackerman.
NEWS
October 12, 2003 | By Heather Bloch FOR THE INQUIRER
On the first day of our two-week walking vacation in France, my boyfriend and I encountered an older gentleman as we climbed the road out of town. He greeted us, touched his hat, and asked our nationality and destination. When we told him where we were headed, he gripped my arm, "Ah, les Americains! Bon courage!" Walking the French countryside brought an immediacy to each moment as the scenery, weather, and our moods and energy levels changed hour to hour. Typical travel complaints - sporadic train schedules, shifting museum hours - gave way to the different concerns of aggressive dogs, lingering blisters, and elusive trail markers.
NEWS
March 5, 1999 | By Sara Sherr, For the Daily News
This is the week for unconventional singer-songwriters, from the local alt-country jamboree of No Electric Guitars to the dry, minimal stylings of Smog's Bill Callahan. No Electric Guitars (10 p.m. tomorrow at the Pontiac Grille, 304 South St., 215-925-4053, $6), is a collaboration between Philadelphia's essential roots-rock players: Rolling Hayseeds' Rich Kaufmann, Marah's Dave Bielanko, former Low Road/current John Train member Mike Brenner, and Napalm Sunday-turned-Emily Valentine's Gerry McGoldrick.
NEWS
October 29, 1987 | By JOAN DePAUL, Daily News Staff Writer
Thomas Mansion is perhaps as close as any Fairmount Park House comes to being a classic setting for a murder mystery. The three-story Victorian, built in 1869, has 18 rooms, all with high ceilings and heavy woodwork, and sits on 23 acres on Wissahickon Avenue near Walnut Lane. George Clifford Thomas built the house two years after he married for the second time. He was 50 and had been retired for 10 years from his life as a businessman. He was building his dream house in the Philadelphia suburbs.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 2013 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
As hundreds of tearful friends and fans filed past two closed coffins Sunday in Charleston, W. Va., a slideshow of family photos showed the simple country life that Buckwild reality TV star Shain Gandee lived long before the cameras started rolling. Set to country music were snapshots of the 21-year-old before his 15 minutes of TV fame: as a uniformed pee wee football player, in a tuxedo for prom, kissing a bride. In some, he wore hunting camouflage, holding a slain buck by its antlers and displaying a batch of gray squirrels.
NEWS
May 15, 2012 | By Jim Rutter, FOR THE INQUIRER
"If you could only know what it is to have lost everything … . Every hope has deserted me. " That a Russian writer penned these lines in 1895 might not surprise us. That the current U.S. president campaigned to restore hope in 2008 gives reason to seek relevance in Anton Chekhov's The Seagull. Quintessence Theatre Group certainly thinks so. Since 2010, this fledgling company has dedicated itself to contemporary productions of classic works. Its innovative stagings include this season's flapper-era Venetian Twins and a riveting rendition of Plato's Apology, during which the small space at Mt. Airy's Sedgwick Theatre boomed like an ancient amphitheater.
NEWS
August 30, 2011
It is a truism that the chasm between Philadelphia and rural Pennsylvania runs deep and wide. The country people don't understand us well, and face it: We don't get them either. Still, plenty about country life - or the way we imagine it, at least - appeals to the city set. The physical beauty. The tranquillity. The nice people. Its pull is particularly strong in the dog days of an urban summer spoiled by the trifecta of historically foul weather, flash mobs, and Arlene Ackerman.
NEWS
October 12, 2003 | By Heather Bloch FOR THE INQUIRER
On the first day of our two-week walking vacation in France, my boyfriend and I encountered an older gentleman as we climbed the road out of town. He greeted us, touched his hat, and asked our nationality and destination. When we told him where we were headed, he gripped my arm, "Ah, les Americains! Bon courage!" Walking the French countryside brought an immediacy to each moment as the scenery, weather, and our moods and energy levels changed hour to hour. Typical travel complaints - sporadic train schedules, shifting museum hours - gave way to the different concerns of aggressive dogs, lingering blisters, and elusive trail markers.
NEWS
May 9, 2003 | By Christine Schiavo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Sheep shearing school seemed like a good idea to John Fay, a suburban biochemist with a country boy's dream. He just didn't expect it to be so bleating hard. "I romanticize about farming," said Fay, 35, who lives in Lehigh County and works for a Montgomery County pharmaceutical company. "But this is difficult. Now I'm thinking of vegetable farming. " If nothing else, the nine men and two women who took an eight-hour course in sheep shearing at Delaware Valley Community College in Doylestown Township this week learned that whatever sheep shearers are charging is a bargain.
LIVING
July 26, 2002 | By Eils Lotozo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It looked like the good life. The apartment in the tony San Francisco neighborhood, the well-paid jobs in advertising. But for Cathleen Miller and her husband, Kerby Macrae, it had all begun to seem hollow. She really wanted to write and to teach. He wanted to work with his hands. And that's how Miller, 46, and Macrae, 43, ended up in the tiny central Pennsylvania village of Zion, renovating a beat-up 100-year-old farmhouse while she slogged through graduate school at Pennsylvania State University and he worked in a furniture factory.
NEWS
August 11, 2000 | By Jeffrey Fleishman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In front of her whitewashed house and beneath window planters made of scrap wood, Milena Tintor sits every morning in her favorite chair - the one with the red cushion - and marvels that her five years as a refugee have ended. In the summer of 1995, Tintor was expelled from the predominantly Serb enclave of Krajina as the Croatian army recaptured it from Serb rebels. Like many of the 150,000 Serbs expelled from Krajina, Tintor was caught in a brutal version of Balkan hopscotch, fleeing through the Bosnian war until she ended up in a camp outside Belgrade, Yugoslavia.
REAL_ESTATE
October 22, 1999 | By Sheila Dyan, FOR THE INQUIRER
Brand new Chester View Apartments, a small rental community of two-bedroom/two-bath garden units, is appealing mainly to seniors and empty nesters, according to property manager David Hassinger. One attraction may be the full complement of appliances. "I had looked at a lot of places when I was ready to move from my home to an apartment, and the idea of a community laundry room didn't appeal to me at all," said Pat Millar, a resident for about a year. "At Chester View, I get my own full-size washer and dryer!
NEWS
September 26, 1999 | By Jeffrey Fleishman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
On the outskirts of town, beyond the bombed buildings, past men selling firewood and women pickling tomatoes for winter, Goran Maslesa moved like a penniless prince among the gasoline smugglers. With cell phone and satchel, he watched for police and hustled bottles of diesel beneath a row of maple trees. But there were few buyers at this outpost of Belgrade's black market. "People are flat out of money," Maslesa said. "It's worse here now than it was in Bosnia after the war. No one can get by. It's a country of smuggled cigarettes, gas and food.
NEWS
March 5, 1999 | By Sara Sherr, For the Daily News
This is the week for unconventional singer-songwriters, from the local alt-country jamboree of No Electric Guitars to the dry, minimal stylings of Smog's Bill Callahan. No Electric Guitars (10 p.m. tomorrow at the Pontiac Grille, 304 South St., 215-925-4053, $6), is a collaboration between Philadelphia's essential roots-rock players: Rolling Hayseeds' Rich Kaufmann, Marah's Dave Bielanko, former Low Road/current John Train member Mike Brenner, and Napalm Sunday-turned-Emily Valentine's Gerry McGoldrick.
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