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NEWS
March 11, 1988 | By Alan Sipress, Inquirer Staff Writer
Camden County Freeholder Joseph R. Carroll provided the deciding vote last night for a motion that both Democrats and Republicans say clears the way for the establishment of a county-executive form of government within a year. Carroll, who had been caught between loyalty to his fellow Democrats and his concerns about a county executive, proposed that the freeholders delay a vote on a Republican resolution that was designed to block the drive to change the form of government. In the place of that resolution, he substituted a motion to appoint a panel to study various forms of government in the county.
NEWS
March 9, 1988 | By Alan Sipress, Inquirer Staff Writer
Camden County Freeholder Joseph F. Carroll, caught between his loyalty to fellow Democrats and concerns about the proposed creation of a county executive, criticized the plan yesterday but stopped short of saying he would block it. Carroll wields the deciding vote on a Republican-sponsored resolution designed to derail a petition drive by Democratic leaders to hold an August referendum on the county-executive proposal. A vote on the GOP proposal for a yearlong study of possible government changes is scheduled for tomorrow - a day described by Republican Freeholder Michael J. DiPiero as Carroll's "day of reckoning.
NEWS
March 30, 1988 | By Alan Sipress, Inquirer Staff Writer
Assemblyman John A. Rocco said yesterday that he was considering requests from fellow Republicans that he run in the fall for Camden County executive, should the new position be approved in a referendum proposed for August. Rocco, one of the most successful Republican vote-getters in the Democratic-controlled county, said he had been approached by "a number of elected officials and others in other key positions in the county. " "There have been a number of inquiries in terms of my interest in the position and attempts to get me interested in the position," Rocco said.
NEWS
February 4, 1988 | By S. A. Paolantonio, Inquirer Staff Writer
Two months ago, amid a bitter election to keep control of Camden County government, county Democratic officials endorsed the concept of amending the county charter to create a strong county-executive form of government. The Republicans, smelling election victory, blasted the announcement as a last-ditch effort by the Democrats to save their campaign, saying that after November, county voters would never again hear about a charter change. Yesterday, the Democrats proved that the proposal had not died, announcing a steering committee called Citizens for Better Government in Camden County that would spearhead a drive for charter reform.
NEWS
December 4, 1987 | By S.A. Paolantonio and Thomas Turcol, Inquirer Staff Writers
About seven weeks ago, when freshman Camden County Freeholders Robert Andrews and Matthew Segal unveiled the Democratic plan to change the county charter to allow a strong county-executive form of government, the proposal was met with predictable campaign skepticism. The Democrats, the Republicans said, were trying to salvage their image in the face of a moribund campaign in order to maintain control of county government. But, a month and a day after the election, the proposed charter change has come up against other opposition - some of it unpredictable and most of it from within the Democratic Party itself.
NEWS
March 8, 1988 | By Alan Sipress, Inquirer Staff Writer
Veteran Democratic Freeholder Joseph F. Carroll may cast the key ballot in a Camden County Freeholder Board vote pitting three young Democrats, who want to create a county-executive form of government, against three Republicans who oppose the plan. As early as Thursday, the seven-member board may vote on a Republican proposal designed to derail a drive to establish a county executive. Carroll said two weeks ago that he did not favor replacing the current form of government with a county executive.
NEWS
March 2, 1988 | By Alan Sipress, Inquirer Staff Writer
The League of Women Voters issued a stinging critique yesterday of the drive by leading Camden County Democrats to create a county-executive form of government. In a prepared statement, the Camden County chapter of the league faulted the proposal's advocates for seeking a referendum this summer on the change without conducting a study of alternative systems. "We believe that the people have a right to be well-informed and have a need to have confidence in their government before signing a petition they know nothing about," the league's statement said.
NEWS
March 23, 1988 | By Alan Sipress, Inquirer Staff Writer
Camden County Freeholder Joseph F. Carroll, who cast the deciding vote two weeks ago against a far-ranging commission to study possible changes in the form of county government, outlined his plans yesterday for a more limited panel. Carroll's committee was immediately dubbed "lame" and "powerless" by Republican freeholders, who warned that it would not affect a drive by young Democrats to create a county-executive form of government. "I don't see (the panel) as a waste of time," said Carroll, a Democrat.
NEWS
March 13, 1988 | By Alan Sipress, Inquirer Staff Writer
During the last week, Camden County Republicans compared the petition drive with a Central American war in which a despotic rebel leader pays foreign mercenaries to overthrow the government. Democratic sponsors of the drive to create a county executive touted the campaign as an exercise of the fundamental American right to petition the government for change. But political salvos made way yesterday for the science of petitioning. Next to the Bavarian Pretzel shop in the Echelon Mall, petition coordinator John Mitchell of San Diego was mulling over the great issue of his day: whether the mall promenade was so broad that shoppers would make an end run around his table.
NEWS
May 27, 1988 | By S.A. Paolantonio and Alan Sipress, Inquirer Staff Writers
A coalition of civic groups yesterday announced a new political chapter in the troubled short history of the Democrat-backed campaign to change Camden County government from a freeholder form to a strong county executive. The groups said that if the Democrats got a referendum on the ballot in August, they would work in concert to defeat it. The announcement by the county chapter of the League of Women Voters, the Cherry Hill Tax Crisis Committee and the National Political Caucus of Black Women amounts to another setback for the county change movement, already in turmoil after the recent disclosure that thousands of petition signatures may have been forged.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
November 8, 2012 | By Rita Giordano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Delaware County's property tax rate would increase 2.8 percent under the proposed county budget. In the draft budget, taxes on the average-valued home would go up by $19.75, according to a recently released letter from Marianne Grace, county executive director. Grace said that as in previous years, her office had worked with "various departments" to cut operating expenses by 5 percent. Among the cost stressors she identified was the $6.8 million contribution to Fair Acres, the county-run geriatric center, and rising pension and health-care costs.
NEWS
August 14, 2011 | By Darran Simon, Inquirer Staff Writer
Five years ago, Patrick Brennan, then deputy county executive of Broome County, N.Y., shopped around a proposal he had devised in his spare time to consolidate five community police forces. His PowerPoint presentation, pitched to community groups and Rotary clubs, was sparse on details, he acknowledged. So, in a few months, the county will try again, with a more detailed proposal from a hired consultant. Consolidation "is happening slowly," said Brennan, now county executive. "I'm 61 years old. I hope I see it before I die. " Broome County - along with Camden, Morris, and Somerset Counties in New Jersey - is following a national wave toward regionalizing police services and manpower under a central administrator with the hope of protecting public safety while saving money.
NEWS
February 18, 2010 | By Mari A. Schaefer INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Even as they react to getting mixed grades in a new national health study, Delaware County officials are poring over the findings of a study of their own. Amid contentious debate over whether the county needs its own health department, officials have received results of a Johns Hopkins University survey that asked county residents about access to everything from flu shots to emergency preparedness. A separate national study by the University of Wisconsin Population Health Institute and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation ranked Delaware County 36th out of 67 Pennsylvania counties for the overall health of residents.
NEWS
October 7, 2009 | By Tom Infield INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Coming into Pittsburgh from high above the rolling hills of Western Pennsylvania, Dan Onorato pointed down from a four-seater jet and said, "See that? We did that. " As he opened his campaign for Pennsylvania governor yesterday - flying from Philadelphia to Harrisburg, then to his hometown of Pittsburgh - Onorato cast himself as a get-things-done guy among the field of five Democrats lining up to seek the state's highest office next year. In his second term as Allegheny County executive, the 48-year-old Onorato (ah-no-RAH-toh)
NEWS
December 17, 2004 | By Joel Bewley INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Burlington County freeholder board has promoted a veteran bureaucrat to take charge of the county government's daily operation. Augustus Mosca, the county's chief of personnel and labor relations, will become county administrator Jan. 1. He will replace Fred Galdo, who is retiring after 31 years as a county employee. "Freddie's leaving, but he's leaving his baby in good hands," Freeholder Director Vince Farias said yesterday when announcing Mosca's new job. The county has roughly 1,750 employees and a $191 million budget.
NEWS
April 19, 2004 | By Kaitlin Gurney INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
As New Jersey's Legislature struggles to craft ethics measures, fierce debate has erupted over whether they should apply to the state's influential county political organizations. Known for their fund-raising muscle, the county parties have fueled the Democrats' rise to power in Trenton, financing key legislative victories and county executive wins all over the state. In November, the powerful Camden County Democrats raised more than half of the record $4 million that propelled newcomer Fred Madden's narrow win over Republican George Geist in a state Senate race.
NEWS
October 8, 2002 | By Steve Goldstein and Joseph A. Gambardello INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
A region already shocked and fearful since last week's shooting rampage was stunned yesterday when a 13-year-old boy was shot and critically wounded as his aunt dropped him off at school in this suburban town northeast of Washington. Late yesterday, a bullet fragment recovered from the boy during surgery was linked by federal officials to last week's seven sniper incidents. Local, state and federal officials were scrambling to cope with rising tension sparked by the random, murderous crime wave.
NEWS
March 25, 2002 | By Tom Turcol INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
With one statewide campaign under his belt and another round of key endorsements in his column, Essex County Executive James Treffinger should be the odds-on favorite to win the Republican U.S. Senate nomination in New Jersey. But while Treffinger - a candidate for the Senate nomination in 2000 - has claimed important party support, his front-runner status is tenuous in an increasingly contentious campaign that is shaping up as one in which anything can happen. Nipping at his heels are five other candidates, with Republican analysts saying State Sen. Diane Allen and wealthy businessman Douglas Forrester show the greatest potential to overtake Treffinger in the June primary and face Democratic Sen. Robert G. Torricelli this fall.
NEWS
September 7, 2001 | By Tom Turcol INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Robert C. Janiszewski, the Hudson County executive and a central figure in New Jersey Democratic politics for nearly two decades, abruptly announced his resignation yesterday amid reports of a widening federal investigation in the county. A brief statement issued by Janiszewski's office said he was leaving office midway through his fourth term for "personal reasons. " His aides declined to elaborate and said Janiszewski would not be available for comment. Janiszewski, 54, wrote in the letter that his resignation would be effective Oct. 1, but he added the unusual language that he would remove himself from all official duties immediately.
NEWS
April 22, 2001 | By Dan Hardy INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Here's a name that should comfort the worried parents of college liberal arts majors who graduate later than usual and without having definite career plans: Marianne Grace. Grace, now 50, earned her bachelor's degree in history in 1980 from Temple University after leaving another university before graduating and taking time off to work. She majored in history because it sounded interesting and was the fastest route to a degree, she said in a recent interview, adding: "I didn't know what I wanted to do. " These days, she certainly does.
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